3304-6-06 Secondary controls.

[Comment: For dates of non-regulatory government publications, publications of recognized organizations and associations, federal rules, and federal statutory provisions referenced in this rule, see the "Incorporation by Reference" section at the end of rule 3304-6-01 of the Administrative Code.]

(A) A secondary control is any device that operates a vehicle subsystem, other than those for steering, speed, and service braking. This rule is limited to adaptive extensions, to relocations of controls, and to devices that actuate one of the subsystems identified in this rule by means of movements of a member(s) of the driver's body by touching a switch or touchpad. This rule includes voice control for specific secondary controls.

(1) Systems using any kind of electrical instrumentation that transduces any process in the driver's body, such as muscle potentials, galvanic skin response, electroencephalograph, eye movement, etc., may be accepted only on a case-by-case basis after engineering study and approval by OOD.

(2) The need for and location of the secondary controls shall be determined by the driver rehabilitation specialist.

(3) In some cases, the need for additional or alternative secondary controls, as well as alternative control locations, is determined by the OOD inspector at the final fitting.

(B) General requirements. Secondary control system adaptive equipment shall be accessible to the driver with a disability for whom it is designed when he/she is behind the wheel, not susceptible to inadvertent operation, and suitable for use by drivers who are not disabled and may need to operate the vehicle. Secondary adaptive control design shall conform with SAE J2238, secondary control modifications. The following requirements, referenced in specific locations in SAE J2238, shall be used to the maximum extent possible:

(1) SAE J1139 "Supplemental Information-Driver Hand Controls Location for Passenger Cars, Multi-purpose Passenger Vehicles, and Trucks (10,000 GVW and Under)."

(2) MIL-STD 1472C "Human Engineering Design Criteria for Military Systems, Equipment and Facilities," section titled "Prevention of Inadvertent Operation."

(3) FMVSS 101.

(C) Electronic secondary controls systems. Any adaptive control for operating secondary functions that incorporates electronic circuits to intervene between the control interface with the driver and OEM control circuit shall meet the following requirements:

(1) These systems may include integrated circuit processors or computers.

(2) These systems shall not be used in conjunction with components of another manufacturer's secondary control console, joystick or multi-axis remote servo steering wheel controls or powered gas/brake controls without both manufacturers' knowledge and permission.

(3) These systems may include touch panels, scanning systems for selecting the desired secondary control, voice control systems and devices such as remote radio frequency controls on a spinner knob.

(D) Secondary control consoles. A secondary control console houses relocated secondary controls and more advanced design secondary controls, including associated automotive systems displays such as a voltmeter, vacuum gauge, pressure gauge, door open indicators or warning lamps, shift quadrant indicators, or display formats presented by liquid crystal or other types of displays. The secondary control console provides access to secondary controls for the driver and a protective housing for the electronic components.

(1) Performance requirements. The secondary control console shall:

(a) Provide positive retention (that is, permanent mounting) of all controls and displays mounted in it or on it;

(b) Use materials suitable for an automotive environment as defined in SAE J1211 and of sufficient strength and rigidity to be comparable to OEM panels for the same purpose on the unmodified vehicle;

(c) Avoid sharp edges through suitable protection, pad the surfaces likely to be contacted by occupants who are properly restrained, and pose no hazard to the vehicle driver or other occupants in the event of a collision; and

(d) Be positioned by supports that are designed to yield, deform, or break away under collision-level loading as defined in FMVSS 201, occupant protection in interior impact.

(2) Design requirements for maintainability. Provisions shall be made for access to serviceable components mounted in the console or on it without requirement for special tools, skill, or methods for gaining access. Any hazards to service personnel or to the equipment which can come about because access to the console is provided shall be prominently labeled by an appropriately worded label when the access hatch or cover is removed.

(3) Labeling of controls and displays. Labeling of controls and displays shall meet the requirements of paragraph (F)(2) of rule 3304-6-03 and paragraph (G) of rule 3304-6-04 of the Administrative Code in its entirety. Non-glare illumination of the labels shall be provided. All illumination sources shall include provisions for dimming the level of illumination.

(E) Transmission.

(1) Extension levers.

(a) Extension levers shall be firmly attached to the OEM shift lever.

(b) OEM shift levers may be extended for additional leverage but the extension shall not cross over to the left side of the column.

(c) Extension levers shall permit all ranges of the transmission to be selectable by the driver and shall not interfere with other controls or adaptive equipment.

(2) Relocated controls. A relocated transmission control is a device which either replaces the automatic transmission control linkage or is connected to it in a manner other than an extension lever. The power input may be mechanical, hydraulic, electric, pneumatic, vacuum, or any combination of these.

(a) All automatic transmissions shall have a specified transmission shift lever sequence, a starter interlock, and at least one low gear. Any interlocks (ignition, brake pedal, etc.) shall not be defeated by the relocated control design or installation. The relocated transmission control shall incorporate a positive indication (that is, the indicator does not drift between gear selection letters) of transmission position in cases in which the OEM shift quadrant is obscured or removed.

(b) Relocated transmission controls shall meet FMVSS 102, transmission shift lever sequence, starter interlock, and transmission braking effect, as applicable.

(3) Powered gearshift control. A powered gearshift control replaces the shift selector lever with an electronic connection to a device that operates the shift linkage at the transmission. When the powered gearshift selector switch interface is located in an electronic secondary control system, the powered gearshift selector shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C), (E)(2)(a) and (E)(2)(b) of this rule.

(F) Parking brake.

(1) Mechanical extension. All extension levers shall be installed to the existing foot pedal parking brake to allow full application and release of the parking brake by hand.

(2) Power parking brake. The power parking brake shall be held in the applied position by mechanical means.

(a) The power parking brake shall be protected from weather. The cables shall be free from mechanical interference.

(b) The control switch for the brake shall be clearly marked for the engaged and disengaged positions and shall be installed on the console or other location in accordance with the consumer's needs for effective and safe operation.

(c) Power parking brake cables shall be firmly secured to the vehicle's undercarriage by automotive ties capable of withstanding harsh and abusive weather and road conditions.

(d) An indicator shall be visible from the driver's position when the parking brake is engaged and the ignition is on.

(e) The operation of the parking brake shall remain in compliance with the applicable portions of FMVSS 135, light vehicle brake systems.

(3) When the powered parking brake switch interface is located in an electronic secondary control system, the powered parking brake shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (F)(2)(a) to (F)(2)(e) of this rule.

(G) Turn signals.

(1) Turn signal lever extension. An add-on extension to the OEM turn signal lever, normally located on the steering column, may be clamp-on or bolt-on lever, or may be otherwise permanently attached to the lever. The device shall be designed so that it does not interfere with either primary or secondary control functions..

(2) Relocated controls. A relocated turn signal is a device which either replaces or is wired in parallel with the standard switching system for operating turn signals. A relocated turn signal control shall incorporate or leave intact the following provisions:

(a) Positive indication (that is, a light) that the turn signals are operating.

(b) Visible indication of the direction of turn.

(c) Automatic cancellation of the signal either by reverse turn of the steering system as on the OEM installation or by an automatic time-out circuit.

(d) Indication of signal lamp or other failures.

(3) When the turn signal switch interface is located in an electronic secondary control system, the turn signal shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (G)(2)(a) to (G)(2)(c) of this rule. The control shall meet the requirements of paragraph (G)(2)(e) of this rule, when it uses the OEM lamps to indicate signal direction.

(H) Hazard warning signals.

(1) Extension grip. An add-on extension grip to the OEM hazard warning switch handle, sometimes located on the steering column, may be a clamp-on or bolt-on lever, or may be otherwise permanently attached to the switch. The device shall be designed so that it does not interfere with either primary or secondary control functions. The hazard warning extension shall be designed to be operable in the driver's position.

(2) Relocated controls. A relocated hazard warning control is a device, which either replaces or is wired in parallel with the standard switching system for operating the hazard warning flashers. A relocated hazard warning control shall incorporate or leave intact the following provisions:

(a) Positive indication (that is, a light) that the hazard flashers are operating.

(b) Indication of signal light failure or other failure.

(3) When the hazard warning signal switch interface is located in an electronic secondary control system, the hazard warning signal control shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (H)(2)(a) of this rule. It shall meet the requirements of paragraph (H)(2)(b) of this rule when the lamps indicate the hazard warning signal being activated.

(I) Windshield wiper/washer.

(1) An add-on extension to the OEM windshield wiper and/or washer control handle or switch may be a clamp-on or bolt-on device, or this extension may replace the OEM handle or switch lever. The device shall be designed to be operable in the driver's position. Extensions to the windshield wiper/washer system shall meet FMVSS 104, windshield wiping and washing systems, as applicable.

(2) A relocated windshield wiper/washer control is a device which either replaces or is wired in parallel with the standard switching system for operating the windshield wipers and washers. A relocated windshield wiper/washer control shall meet FMVSS 104 as applicable and shall incorporate or leave intact the following provisions:

(a) All wiper speeds originally available with the unaltered windshield wiper system.

(b) Automatic parking of the wiper arms when the wiper system is shut off and the ignition is on.

(3) When the windshield washer/wiper switch interface is located in an electronic secondary control system, the windshield washer/wiper control shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (I)(2)(b) of this rule. The control shall incorporate at least wash/wipe, slow, and fast settings.

(J) Ignition and engine start.

(1) An add-on extension handle to the OEM bezel that activates the ignition-system-status-and-engine-start function may be a clamp-on or a bolt-on device. This device shall be designed to be operable in the driver's position and when the vehicle is in motion. In addition, express provisions to minimize the possibility of inadvertent operation (particularly ignition shut off) shall be incorporated in the design of an add-on extension to the OEM bezel for the ignition switch. Extensions may be added to ignition keys for easier insertion into the lock and turning the key/lock.

(2) Relocated ignition/engine start controls are devices suitably designed that either replace the standard switching system or are wired in parallel with it. The ignition control and engine start control may be integrated as they are in almost all vehicles but they may also be separate controls if they are relocated so as to be accessible and/or operable in the driver's position. A relocated ignition switch shall incorporate the following provisions:

(a) Inadvertent operation, particularly operation which shuts off the ignition, shall be minimized by:

(i) Isolating or guarding the switch or control so that, although it is still accessible to the driver, it is not likely to be operated through mistake or accident. There are a number of methods for physically isolating or guarding a switch in sources such as MIL-STD 1472, section 5.4.1.8, prevention of accidental activation, as applicable. Specific attention to this requirement shall be documented by the adaptive equipment supplier and/or installer to OOD before acceptance.

(ii) Plainly marking the ignition switch or control as provided in FMVSS 101.

(b) The battery disconnect shall retain the OEM provision to disconnect loads of auxiliary systems from the battery during engine cranking.

(c) When possible, the ignition switch shall retain provisions for theft protection.

(d) A relocated engine start switch or control shall incorporate or leave intact the following provisions:

(i) Interlock with transmission position so that engine cranking is only possible in park or neutral and, when the unmodified vehicle was so equipped, shifting from neutral or park requires application of the service brake; and

(ii) FMVSS 102, and MIL-STD 1472, section 5.4.1.8, as applicable, shall be met by all relocated ignition/engine start switches separately or combined.

(3) When the ignition and engine start switch interfaces are located in an electronic secondary control system, the ignition and engine start switch shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (J)(2) of this rule.

(K) Lights.

(1) Panel and exterior controls.

(a) An add-on extension handle or lever for a light switch may be a clamp-on or bolt-on device, or it may completely replace the OEM light switch knob or lever. This device shall be designed to be operable in the driver's position.

(b) Relocated light controls are devices that either replace the standard switching system or are wired in parallel with it. Although panel lights and exterior lights are generally on the same switch assembly, these functions may be separate switches if relocated. Exterior lights (that is, parking/running lights, marker lights, tail lights, license plate lights, and headlights) shall be controlled by a single switch assembly having three positions: one position turns on all exterior lights, except for headlights; one position turns on all exterior lights including headlights; and the third position is off. If panel light brightness control was part of the OEM design of the panel lighting circuit, provision for adjusting brightness of the panel lights shall be incorporated into the design of relocated light control.

(c) When the headlight control switch interfaces are located in an electronic secondary control system, the headlight control switch shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (K)(1)(b) of this rule, with the exception of the panel light brightness control. Headlights on/off control switch interfaces shall not be included on a scanning type control.

(2) Headlight beam selector. This device is often referred to as a "dimmer switch," and is designed to accomplish the function of selecting the upper and the lower beam headlights while the vehicle is in motion.

(a) Relocated beam selectors shall retain or substitute an equivalent high beam indicator which shall indicate to the driver when he/she has selected the high beam headlights.

(b) When the headlight dimmer control switch interfaces are located in an electronic secondary control system, the headlight dimmer control switch shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (K)(2)(a) of this rule.

(L) Seats. Seat requirements in this paragraph are limited to vehicle seats that are provided as replacements or supplements to OEM seats and are specifically designed for automotive installation. The term "seat" specifically excludes wheelchairs, whether occupied or not, and includes special adaptive seat assemblies that move a driver from a wheelchair transfer position to a position behind the controls or to a position as a passenger.

(1) Vehicle seats that replace or supplement OEM seats shall meet the requirements of FMVSS 207, seating systems, as applicable. Seats shall meet FMVSS 302, flammability of interior materials. Seats shall incorporate OEM restraint devices, or restraint devices shall be installed. All restraint devices shall meet the requirements of FMVSS 208, occupant crash protection.

(2) Any cable, wire bundle, or other connective device associated with a vehicle seat shall be designed to remain clear of pinch points, abrasion, or other damage and shall remain connected throughout the range of movement of the seat; and maintain any wires needed for devices associated with meeting the requirements of FMVSS 208.

(3) When the seat control switch interfaces are located in an electronic secondary control system, the seat control switch shall meet all requirements of paragraph (C) of this rule.

(M) Power transfer seat bases. A power transfer seat base, other than an OEM power seat base, is installed in a vehicle solely for adaptive reasons, e.g., to move the seat to a location more accessible for a wheelchair user to transfer from the wheelchair to the driver's seat. The powered transfer seat base typically provides longer travel, up/down motion, and ninety degree rotation.

(1) The powered seat controls shall be permanently labeled with seat movement icons. Direction of movement of the powered seat controls shall be consistent with the direction of the chair occupant's position, as provided in MIL-STD 1472.

(2) Controls for the power seat base shall be operable by the seated occupant at any point during the transfer cycle to and from the power seat. All wires shall be protected against entanglement, possible disengagement, breakage, and stretching when the seat moves in any direction.

(3) The power seat base and the seat itself shall be mounted and secured with automotive type bolts/attachments of OEM grade or equivalent. If the seat base is not bolted through into a cross member of the vehicle, a steel backing plate of at least fourteen-gauge steel shall be used.

(4) The standard OEM seat belt arrangement shall be reattached to the vehicle. When a powered transfer seat base is used, a wheelchair tie-down shall be used to secure the wheelchair in the transfer position.

(5) The seat base must be tested to certify compliance to FMVSS 207 and 210.

(N) Seat adjustment. Adaptive devices for seat adjustment range from simple add-to existing manual releases on vehicle seats to relocated control panels for power seats. These devices bring seat adjustment controls within the reach of the driver to meet his/her needs.

(1) Manual extension levers. An add-on extension handle or grip to release a seat for manual adjustment may be a clamp-on or bolt-on device, or may be permanently attached to the OEM lever. The device shall be designed so that it does not interfere with either primary or secondary control functions, and does not present a hazard to vehicle occupants in the event of a collision.

(2) Power adjustment. A power seat control may be an OEM power seat control panel which is placed in a more accessible location, or a panel designed to control a special adaptive seat. The panel shall be designed and installed in such a manner that it does not interfere with operation of either the primary or secondary controls and that the probability of inadvertent operation of the seat is prevented when the vehicle is in motion. In the case of a powered seat that facilitates transfer of the driver from a wheelchair to the driver position, a control panel shall be located at the point of transfer and accessible to the driver when he/she is in the driver position. The control panel shall not be placed in a location where the user can catch his/her fingers in the seat mechanisms while in operation.

(O) Aftermarket power windows. Aftermarket power windows for after-market adaptation of vehicles are devices sold by accessory manufacturers to replace manual window cranks and shall conform to FMVSS 118, power-operated window, partition, and roof panel systems. The standards in this section do not apply to power window units that are manufactured by or for the vehicle maker for installation as a factory or dealer option, and that are retrofitted by a retail dealer; this exemption applies when the unit is installed and the controls are located as originally designed by the vehicle manufacturer.

(1) Switch design shall be tailored to the driver's degree of dexterity.

(2) When two switches are required, the switch layout shall be arranged so that there are two switches for each position, one for raising and another for lowering the window. The switch for raising shall be forward of or above the switch for lowering.

(3) If the aftermarket power window switch interfaces are located in an electronic secondary control system, the aftermarket power window switch shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (O)(1) and (O)(2) of this rule.

(P) Power windows. Power windows refer to power window units manufactured by or for the OEM for installation as a factory or OEM dealer option and retrofitted by a retail dealer.

(1) Relocated power window controls. If the OEM power window control switches are not within the reach of the driver, the power window switches may be relocated to a more convenient location. A relocated power window control is a device that replaces the standard switching system for operating any or all of the power window controls, or is wired in parallel with it. Power window controls shall move in the following directions to raise or lower the windows, depending on placement:

(a) Horizontal placement of switch. The switch shall move toward the front of the vehicle to raise the window and toward the rear of the vehicle to lower the window.

(b) Placement on door panel. The switch shall move upward to raise the window and downward to lower the window.

(c) When pushbutton or contact switches are installed to accommodate the needs of the driver, arrangements shall be as specified pursuant to paragraph (P) of this rule. When two switches are required, one switch shall raise and another switch shall lower the window. The switch for raising the window shall be forward of or above the switch for lowering in all locations.

(2) When the power window switch interfaces are located in an electronic secondary control system, the power window switch control shall meet the requirements of paragraph (C) of this rule.

(3) Relocated power window controls or power window switch interfaces located in an electronic secondary control system shall comply with FMVSS 118.

(Q) Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) controls. This class of secondary controls refers to adaptive equipment to permit operation of selected functions or all functions built into a vehicle HVAC system. Nothing in this paragraph shall be construed to require any vehicle to be equipped with any HVAC system or part thereof.

(1) If an add-on extension or replacement handle to any control on the HVAC panel is installed, it shall be installed to render that control accessible to a driver in the driving position. Any extension handle shall be securely fastened or clamped, and shall be designed and installed so as to not interfere with the operation of primary adaptive controls. If such an extension or set of extensions are installed, provisions should be made to operate the functions in the following order of priority:

(a) Defrost.

(b) Fan.

(c) Temperature.

(d) Heat, air.

(e) Vent (outside air).

(f) Other functions.

(2) Relocated HVAC controls are devices to either replace the standard HVAC control panel or are wired/connected in parallel with it. The priorities of relocation of functions are the same as in paragraph (Q)(1) of this rule. Movement of relocated controls shall follow either the movements of the original panel or be designed in accordance with SAE J1139.

(3) When the HVAC control switch interfaces are located in an electronic secondary control system, the HVAC control switch shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (Q)(2) of this rule.

(R) Door locks. Locks as secondary controls include extensions or modifications to the manual door locks to make them accessible and controllable from the driver's position, and controls for operating power door locks.

(1) An add-on manual extension to the OEM manual door lock handle may be a clamp-on or bolt-on device, or this extension may be a replacement for the OEM handle to make it more accessible or easier to operate by the driver in the driver's position.

(2) A relocated power door lock control is a device which either replaces the standard switching system for operating either all the door locks or any particular door lock or is wired in parallel with it. Power door lock controls shall move in the following directions to raise the door lock button, depending on placement:

(a) Horizontal placement of switch. The switch shall move toward front of vehicle.

(b) Placement on door panel. The switch shall move upwards.

(c) Engaging of door lock shall be accomplished in all cases in this paragraph by a control movement in the opposite direction.

(d) Switch design shall be tailored to the driver's degree of dexterity. If push buttons or contact switches are used in order to adapt to the driver, arrangements shall be as specified in this paragraph. When two switches are required, one switch shall raise the door lock and the other shall lower it. The switch for raising shall be forward of or above the switch for lowering in all locations specified in this paragraph.

(3) When the power door lock control switch interfaces are located in an electronic secondary control system, the power door lock control switch shall meet the requirements of paragraph (C) of this rule.

(4) Relocated power door lock controls or power door lock control switch interfaces located in an electronic secondary control system shall retain OEM compliance with FMVSS 114, theft protection.

(S) Horn.

(1) Relocation horn controls shall retain instant accessibility of the OEM horn control and all other attributes of the OEM horn function.

(2) When the horn control interface is located in an electronic secondary control system, the horn switch shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (B) and (S)(1) of this rule.

(T) Cruise control.

(1) A relocated cruise control is a device that either replaces or is wired in parallel with the standard switching system for operating the OEM or an aftermarket cruise control. A relocated cruise control shall be in compliance with FMVSS 124, and all functions originally available shall remain unaltered.

(2) When the cruise control switch interface is located in an electronic secondary control system, the cruise control system shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (T)(1) of this rule.

(U) Mirror control.

(1) A relocated mirror control is a device that either replaces or is wired in parallel with the standard switching system for operating the OEM or an aftermarket mirror control. A relocated mirror control shall leave intact all functions originally available.

(2) When the mirror control switch interface is located in an electronic secondary control system, the mirror control system shall meet the requirements of paragraphs (C) and (U)(1) of this rule.

(3) It should be noted that while FMVSS 111, rearview mirrors, prohibits moving or removing OEM mirrors, it does not prohibit installing additional mirrors when needed by the consumer for proper visibility.

Effective: 09/08/2014
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 06/23/2014 and 09/08/2019
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 3304.15(C)(1)
Rule Amplifies: 3304.15 , 3304.17
Prior Effective Dates: 05/10/1995, 08/02/1999, 06/03/2002, 08/04/2008