Chapter 3745-81 Primary Drinking Water Rules

3745-81-01 Definitions.

As used in this chapter:

(A) "Action level" is the concentration of lead or copper in water specified in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-80 of the Administrative Code.

(B) "Actual CT" means the CT value or the sum of CT values that is representative of the disinfection as determined in accordance with rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code.

(C) "Approved effective volume factor" means the ratio of the disinfectant contact time (T) to the theoretical contact time. The theoretical contact time is the lowest daily clearwell operating volume during the peak hourly flow divided by the peak hourly flow.

(D) "Average household size" for the purposes of determining if a system is a "public water system" as defined in this rule, means 2.44 individuals per service connection in accordance with the 2010 federal census for the state of Ohio.

(E) "Bag filters" means pressure-driven separation devices that remove particulate matter larger than one micrometer using an engineered porous filtration media. They are typically constructed of a non-rigid, fabric filtration media housed in a pressure vessel in which the direction of flow is from the inside of the bag to outside.

(F) "Bank filtration" means a water treatment process that uses a well to recover surface water that has naturally infiltrated into ground water through a river bed or bank. Infiltration is typically enhanced by the hydraulic gradient imposed by a nearby pumping water supply or other well.

(G) "Best available technology" or "BAT" means the best technology, treatment techniques, or other means which the director may approve, after examination for efficacy under field conditions and taking cost into consideration, for a public water system to use for achieving compliance with a maximum contaminant level. For synthetic organic chemicals, any BAT must be at least as effective as granular activated carbon.

(H) "Cartridge filters" means pressure-driven separation devices that remove particulate matter larger than one micrometer using an engineered porous filtration media. They are typically constructed as rigid or semi-rigid, self supporting filter elements housed in pressure vessels in which flow is from the outside of the cartridge to the inside.

(I) "Chemical Abstracts Service registry number" or "CAS number" means the hyphenated number assigned by the "American Chemical Society's Chemical Abstracts Service" to uniquely designate a chemical substance, regardless of the various names used for this substance.

(J) "Coagulation" means a process using coagulant chemicals and mixing by which colloidal and suspended materials are destabilized and agglomerated into flocs.

(K) "Coliform bacteria" means any of the enterobacteriaceae group, including all aerobic and facultative anaerobic gram-negative, nonspore-forming bacilli which utilize lactose with or without the formation of gas.

(L) "Combined distribution system" means an interconnected distribution system consisting of the distribution systems of wholesale systems and of the consecutive systems that receive finished water. Combined distribution systems do not include consecutive systems which receive water from a wholesale system only on an emergency basis or receive only a small percentage and small volume of water from a wholesale system. Combined distribution systems do not include wholesale systems which deliver water to a consecutive system only on an emergency basis or deliver only a small percentage and small volume of water to a consecutive system.

(M) "Combined population" means the total number of individuals served by the public water system as a prime supplier plus those individuals served through a consecutive water system(s).

(N) "Compliance cycle" means the nine-year cycle for monitoring during which public water systems shall monitor. Each compliance cycle consists of three three-year compliance periods. The first compliance cycle began January 1, 1993.

(O) "Compliance period" means one of the three periods of three consecutive calendar years within a compliance cycle. Each compliance cycle has three three-year compliance periods. Within the first compliance cycle, the first compliance period began January 1, 1993 .

(P) "Comprehensive performance evaluation" or "CPE" means a thorough review and analysis of a treatment plant's performance-based capabilities and associated administrative, operation and maintenance practices. It is conducted to identify factors that may be adversely impacting a plant's performance. The comprehensive performance evaluation consists of at least the following components: assessments of plant performance; evaluation of major unit processes; identification and prioritization of performance limiting factors; assessment of the applicability of comprehensive technical assistance; and preparation of a CPE report.

(Q) "Confluent growth" means a continuous bacterial growth, covering the entire filtration area of a membrane filter, or a portion thereof, in which bacterial colonies are not discrete.

(R) "Consecutive water system" means a public water system that receives water from one or more public water systems, excluding emergency interconnections or interconnections where only a small percentage and small volume of water are received. Delivery may be through a direct connection or through the distribution system of one or more consecutive systems.

(S) "Consumer notice," for the purpose of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, means notification of individual tap results from lead tap water monitoring in accordance with paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-85 of the Administrative Code.

(T) "Contaminant" means any physical, chemical, biological or radiological substance or matter in water.

(U) "Conventional filtration treatment" means a series of processes including coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, and filtration resulting in substantial removal of particles.

(V) "Corrosion inhibitor" means a substance capable of reducing the corrosivity of water toward metal plumbing materials, especially lead and copper, by forming a protective film on the interior surface of those materials.

(W) "Contact time" or "CT" means the mathematical product of a "residual disinfectant concentration" (C), which is determined before or at the first customer, and the corresponding "disinfectant contact time" (T).

(X) "Direct filtration" means a series of processes, including coagulation and filtration but excluding sedimentation, resulting in substantial removal of particles from water.

(Y) "Director of environmental protection" or "director" includes an authorized representative of the director.

(Z) "Disinfectant" means any oxidant, including but not limited to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramines, and ozone added to water in any part of the treatment or distribution process, that is intended to kill or inactivate pathogenic microorganisms.

(AA) "Disinfectant contact time" ("T" in CT calculations) means the time in minutes that it takes for water to move from the point of disinfectant application or the previous point of disinfectant residual measurement to a point before or at the point where residual disinfectant concentration (C) is measured.

(BB) "Disinfection" means a process which inactivates pathogenic organisms in water by the addition of chemical oxidant(s) or equivalent agents.

(CC) "Disinfection profile" means a summary of Giardia lamblia inactivation through the treatment plant.

(DD) "District office" means the office of the Ohio environmental protection agency located in the district within which the subject water system is located.

(EE) "Dose equivalent" means the product of the absorbed dose from ionizing radiation and such other factors as account for differences in biological effectiveness due to the type of radiation and its distribution in the body as specified by the "International Commission of Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU)."

(FF) "Dual sample set" means a set of two samples collected at the same time and same location, with one sample analyzed for TTHM and the other sample analyzed for HAA5. Dual sample sets are collected in accordance with paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(GG) "Effective corrosion inhibitor residual," for the purpose of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, means a concentration sufficient to form a passivating film on the interior walls of a pipe.

(HH) "Enhanced coagulation" means the addition of sufficient coagulant for improved removal of disinfection byproduct precursors by conventional filtration treatment.

(II) "Enhanced softening" means the improved removal of disinfection byproduct precursors by precipitative softening.

(JJ) "Filter profile" means a graphical representation of individual filter performance based on continuous turbidity measurements or total particle counts versus time for an entire filter run, from startup to backwash inclusively, that includes an assessment of filter performance while another filter is being backwashed.

(KK) "Filtration" means a process for removing particles from water by passage through porous media.

(LL) "Finished water" means water that is introduced into the distribution system of a public water system and is intended for distribution and consumption without further treatment, except as necessary to maintain water quality in the distribution system (e.g., booster disinfection, addition of corrosion control chemicals).

(MM) "First-draw sample" means a one-liter sample of tap water, collected in accordance with paragraph (B)(2) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code, that has been standing in plumbing pipes at least six hours and is collected without flushing the tap.

(NN) "Flocculation" means a process which enhances agglomeration of particles into larger, more easily settleable particles through gentle stirring.

(OO) "Flowing stream" means a course of running water flowing in a definite channel.

(PP) "GAC10" means granular activated carbon filter beds with an empty-bed contact time of ten minutes based on average daily flow and a carbon reactivation frequency of every one hundred eighty days, except that the reactivation frequency for GAC10 used as a best available technology for compliance with paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code shall be one hundred twenty days.

(QQ) "GAC20" means granular activated carbon filter beds with an empty-bed contact time of twenty minutes based on average daily flow and a carbon reactivation frequency of every two hundred forty days.

(RR) "Grab sample" means a single, physical sample of water collected at a particular time and place which represents the composition of the water only at the time and place.

(SS) "Gross alpha particle activity" means the total radioactivity due to alpha particle emission as inferred from measurements on a dry sample.

(TT) "Gross beta particle activity" means the total radioactivity due to beta particle emission as inferred from measurements on a dry sample.

(UU) "Ground water" means any water below the surface of the earth in a zone of saturation which is not directly influenced by surface water, which is obtained through a well constructed in accordance with plans approved by the director under section 6109.07 of the Revised Code and Chapter 3745-9 of the Administrative Code.

(VV) "Ground water source," for the purpose of rules 3745-81-41 to 3745-81-45 of the Administrative Code, means a well.

(WW) "Ground water system" means any public water system that uses ground water except for those that combine all of their ground water with surface water prior to treatment under rule 3745-81-71 of the Administrative Code. A ground water system also includes consecutive systems receiving finished ground water.

(XX) "Haloacetic acids (five)" or "HAA5" means the sum of the concentrations in milligrams per liter of the haloacetic acid compounds (monochloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, and dibromoacetic acid), rounded to two significant figures after addition.

(YY) "Halogen" means one of the following chemical elements: chlorine, bromine or iodine.

(ZZ) "High background count" or "HBC" means that the total number of bacterial colonies exceeds two hundred on a forty-seven-millimeter diameter membrane filter used for coliform detection.

(AAA) "Human consumption" means the ingestion or absorption of water or water vapor as the result of drinking, cooking, dishwashing, hand washing, bathing, showering, or oral hygiene.

(BBB) "Hydrogeologic barriers" means physical, biologic, or chemical factors, singularly or in combination, that prevent the movement of viable pathogens from a contamination source to a water supply well.

(CCC) "Hydrogeologic sensitivity assessment" or "HSA" means an evaluation of a ground water source's susceptibility to pathogen contamination at a specific site, using all available data. All available data may include well construction, hydrogeologic, geologic and water quality data, which is evaluated in conjunction with the local distribution of pathogen sources.

(DDD) "Lake/reservoir" means a natural or man-made basin or hollow on the Earth's surface in which water collects or is stored that may or may not have a current or single direction of flow.

(EEE) "Large water system," for the purpose of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, means a public water system that serves more than fifty thousand persons.

(FFF) "Lead service line" means a service line made of lead which connects a water main to a building inlet and any lead pigtail, gooseneck, or other fitting which is connected to such a lead line.

(GGG) "Legionella" means a genus of bacteria, some species of which may cause Legionnaires' disease.

(HHH) "Locational running annual average" or "LRAA" means the average of sample analytical results for samples taken at a particular monitoring location during the previous four calendar quarters.

(III) "Man-made beta particle and photon emitters" means all radionuclides emitting beta particles and/or photons listed in the maximum permissible body burdens and maximum permissible concentrations of radionuclides in air and water for occupational exposures, "NBS Handbook 69," except the daughter products of thorium-232, uranium-235 and uranium-238.

(JJJ) "Maximum contaminant level" or "MCL" means the maximum permissible level of a contaminant in water which is delivered to any user of a public water system.

(KKK) "Maximum contaminant level goal" or "MCLG" means the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

(LLL) "Maximum residual disinfectant level" or "MRDL" means the highest level of disinfectant allowed under conditions specified in rule 3745-81-10 of the Administrative Code.

(MMM) "Medium water system", for the purpose of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, means a public water system that serves greater than three thousand three hundred and less than or equal to fifty thousand persons.

(NNN) "Membrane filtration" means a pressure or vacuum driven separation process in which particulate matter larger than one micrometer is rejected by an engineered barrier, primarily through a size-exclusion mechanism, and which has a measurable removal efficiency of a target organism that can be verified through the application of a direct integrity test. This definition includes the common membrane technologies of microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis.

(OOO) "Method detection limit" or "MDL" is the minimum concentration of a substance that can be measured and reported with ninety-nine per cent confidence that the analyte concentration is greater than zero and is determined from analysis of a sample in a given matrix containing the analyte.

(PPP) "Minimal treatment," for the purpose of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code, means either no treatment, or treatment consisting of only cartridge filtration or cation exchange, or a combination of only cartridge filtration and cation exchange.

(QQQ) "Monitor" means the sampling of public drinking water, the submittal of sample(s) to a laboratory certified for the appropriate analysis, and the analysis for the contaminants or characteristics of the water.

(RRR) "New source" means:

(1) A well that is located in a new well field;

(2) A new well that is located in an existing well field for which the results of source water analysis conducted in accordance with rule 3745-9-09 or 3745-91-06 of the Administrative Code indicate the presence of any primary inorganic or radiological contaminant above eighty per cent of the MCL standard or any organic contaminant (except trihalomethanes) at detectable concentrations;

(3) An intake that is located in a surface water body not previously used; or

(4) A new intake that is located in a previously used surface water body for which the results of source water analysis conducted in accordance with rule 3745-91-06 of the Administrative Code indicate the presence of any primary inorganic or radiological contaminant above eighty per cent of the MCL standard or any organic contaminant (except trihalomethanes) at detectable concentrations.

(SSS) "Normal operating conditions" means the operational and treatment processes routinely used by a public water system which are representative of the practices under which water is typically delivered to consumers. Public water systems required to collect samples during normal operating conditions shall not deliberately change distribution or treatment processes, or operating practices during or just prior to sample collection for the sole purpose of influencing sample results collected for compliance purposes. This includes but is not limited to the following examples for the collection of disinfection byproduct or total organic carbon samples: deliberately flushing the distribution system just prior to the collection of samples; temporarily performing enhanced coagulation or softening just prior to the collection of samples; deliberately reducing chlorine dosage just prior to the collection of samples; deliberately turning off pre-chlorination just prior to the collection of samples.

(TTT) "Optimal corrosion control treatment," for the purpose of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, means the corrosion control treatment that minimizes the lead and copper concentrations at users' taps while ensuring that the treatment does not cause the water system to violate any national primary drinking water regulations.

(UUU) "Person" means an individual, corporation, company, association, partnership, the state, any political subdivision, agency, institution, or instrumentality thereof, or federal agency.

(VVV) "Picocurie" or "pCi" means that quantity of radioactive material producing two and twenty-two hundredths nuclear transformations per minute.

(WWW) "Plant intake" means the works or structures at the head of a conduit through which water is diverted from a source (e.g., river or lake) into the treatment plant.

(XXX) "Point-of-entry treatment device" is a treatment device applied to the drinking water entering a house or building for the purpose of reducing the contaminants in the drinking water distributed through all, or a portion of, the house or building.

(YYY) "Point-of-use treatment device" is a treatment device applied to a single tap used for the purpose of reducing contaminants in drinking water at that one tap.

(ZZZ) "Point of disinfectant application" means a location where disinfectant is added to a water system, and water downstream of this location is protected from recontamination.

(AAAA) "Presedimentation" means a preliminary treatment process used to remove gravel, sand and other particulate material from the source water through settling before the water enters the primary clarification and filtration processes in a treatment plant.

(BBBB) "Public education" for the purpose of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, means delivery of educational materials, in accordance with paragraphs (A) and (B) of rule 3745-81-85 of the Administrative Code, when an action level is exceeded.

(CCCC) "Public notification" means notification to persons served by a public water system of violations or other situations in accordance with rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code.

(DDDD) "Public water system" or "PWS" means a system which provides water for human consumption through pipes or other constructed conveyances, if such system has at least fifteen service connections or regularly serves an average of at least twenty-five individuals daily at least sixty days out of the year. Such term includes any collection, treatment, storage, and distribution facilities under control of the operator of such system and used primarily in connection with such system, any collection or pretreatment storage facilities not under such control which are used primarily in connection with such system, and any water supply system serving an agriculture labor camp, as defined in section 3733.41 of the Revised Code. Such term does not include any "special irrigation district," as defined in 40 CFR 141.2 . A public water system is either a "community water system" or a "noncommunity water system." An existing public water system is prohibited from splitting the distribution system or adding additional sources to avoid regulation by Chapter 6109. of the Revised Code.

(1) "Community water system" or "CWS" means a public water system which serves at least fifteen service connections available for use by year-round residents or regularly serves at least twenty-five year-round residents. For the purposes of determining regulation under Chapter 6109. of the Revised Code, the population calculations and defaults in this rule will be used unless documentation proving otherwise is presented and is acceptable to the director.

The population of a CWS shall be determined by an actual count of residents or by multiplying the number of service connections by the average household size.

In the case of a prison cell, nursing home bed, or an otherwise occupied or intended to be occupied living space that is or may be occupied on a day-to-day basis by an individual, the population shall be determined by an actual count of beds available.

(2) "Noncommunity water system" or "NCWS" means a public water system that is not a community water system. A noncommunity water system is either a "nontransient noncommunity water system" or a "transient noncommunity water system." For the purposes of determining regulation under Chapter 6109. of the Revised Code, the population calculations and defaults in this rule will be used unless documentation proving otherwise is presented and is acceptable to the director.

When the average number of individuals regularly served by a noncommunity water system cannot be readily determined, the director shall determine the population served on a case by case basis. In making this determination, the director may consider an actual daily count of individuals, sales receipts, seating capacity or the issued certificate or certificates of occupancy as in the case of a building as defined by section 3781.06 of the Revised Code, or any other information deemed reliable regarding the potential population served.

(a) "Nontransient noncommunity water system" or "NTNCWS" means a public water system that regularly serves at least twenty-five of the same persons over six months per year and is not a CWS.

(b) "Transient noncommunity water system" or "TNCWS" means a noncommunity public water system that does not regularly serve at least twenty-five of the same persons over six months per year and is not a CWS or a NTNCWS. Examples of TNCWS may include, but are not limited to, systems serving gas stations, taverns, motels, restaurants, churches, campgrounds and parks.

(EEEE) "Radiation equivalent man" or "rem" means the unit of dose equivalent from ionizing radiation to the total body or any internal organ or organ system. A "millirem (mrem)" is one one-thousandth of a rem.

(FFFF) "Required CT" means the CT value that is considered sufficient disinfection treatment to consistently and reliably achieve at least 99.9 per cent (3 log) inactivation and/or removal of Giardia lamblia cysts and at least 99.99 per cent (4 log) inactivation and/or removal of viruses as determined in accordance with rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code.

(GGGG) "Residual disinfectant concentration" ("C" in CT calculations) means the concentration of disinfectant measured in milligrams per liter in a representative sample of water.

(HHHH) "Safe Drinking Water Act" or "SDWA" means the Safe Drinking Water Act, 88 Stat. 1660 (1974), 42 U.S.C. 300(f) and regulations adopted thereunder.

(IIII) "Sampling point" means:

(1) For groundwater systems, each entry point to the distribution system which is representative of each well after treatment, and

(2) For surface water systems, each entry point to the distribution system after any application of treatment or in the distribution system at points representative of each source.

(JJJJ) "Sanitary survey" means an onsite review to evaluate the adequacy of the water source, treatment, distribution system, finished water storage, pumps, pump facilities and controls, monitoring, reporting and data verification, system management and operation, and to review operator compliance with state requirements.

(KKKK) "Sedimentation" means a process for removal of solids before filtration.

(LLLL) "Service connection," for the purposes of this chapter, is the active or inactive pipe, gooseneck, pigtail, and any other fitting that connects or has the potential to connect each individual house, apartment unit, condominium, mobile home or any structure with human consumption available to the public water system regardless of whether the water usage is metered.

(MMMM) "Service line sample" means a one-liter sample of water, collected in accordance with paragraph (B)(3) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code, that has been standing for at least six hours in a service line.

(NNNN) "Significant deficiency," unless otherwise specified in this chapter, means a defect in the system that puts the system in violation of a drinking water requirement or that causes an unacceptable risk to the public's health.

(OOOO) "Single family structure," for the purpose of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, means a building constructed as a single-family residence that is currently used as either a residence or a place of business.

(PPPP) "Slow sand filtration" means a process of passing raw water through a porous granular medium, at a rate of less than one hundred fifty gallons per day per square foot of sand area, with substantial removal of particles by physical and biological mechanisms.

(QQQQ) "Small water system," for the purpose of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, means a public water system that serves three thousand three hundred persons or fewer.

(RRRR) "Source water at the entry point to the distribution system," for the purpose of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, means finished water (as defined in this rule) or water that is introduced into the distribution system of a public water system and is intended for distribution and consumption without further treatment, except as necessary to maintain water quality in the distribution system (e.g., booster disinfection, addition of corrosion control chemicals).

(SSSS) "State primary drinking water rules" means rules of Chapter 3745-81 of the Administrative Code.

(TTTT) "Supplier of water" means any person who owns or operates a public water system.

(UUUU) "Surface water" means:

(1) All water which is open to the atmosphere and subject to surface runoff, or

(2) A source which has been designated by the director as surface water in accordance with rule 3745-81-76 of the Administrative Code.

(VVVV) "Surface water system" means a public water system which uses surface water, in whole or in part, as its source of water.

(WWWW) "SUVA" means specific ultraviolet absorption at two hundred fifty-four nanometers. It is calculated by dividing a sample's ultraviolet absorption at a wavelength of two hundred fifty-four nanometers (UV254) [in reciprocal meters (M-1)] by its concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) [in milligrams per liter (mg/L)].

(XXXX) "System with a single service connection" means a public water system which supplies drinking water to consumers via a single service line.

(YYYY) "Third party" means a team of persons conducting a comprehensive performance evaluation who are not employees of the public water system owner and who are independent of the public water system.

(ZZZZ) "Total trihalomethanes" or "TTHM" means the sum of the concentrations in milligrams per liter of the trihalomethane compounds trichloromethane (chloroform), dibromochloromethane, bromodichloromethane and tribromomethane (bromoform), rounded to two significant figures after addition.

(AAAAA) "Treatment technique" means a method for treating water to achieve acceptable levels of the contaminants in lieu of establishing a maximum contaminant level.

(BBBBB) "Treatment technique requirement" means a requirement of the state primary drinking water rules which specifies for a contaminant a specific treatment technique or techniques known to the director which leads to a reduction in the level of such a contaminant sufficient to comply with the requirements of this chapter.

(CCCCC) "Trihalomethane" or "THM" means one of the family of organic compounds, named as derivatives of methane, wherein three of the four hydrogen atoms in methane are each substituted by a halogen atom in the molecular structure.

(DDDDD) "Total organic carbon" or "TOC" means total organic carbon in milligrams per liter (mg/L) measured using heat, oxygen, ultraviolet irradiation, chemical oxidants, or combinations of these oxidants that convert organic carbon to carbon dioxide, rounded to two significant figures.

(EEEEE) "Two-stage lime softening" means a process in which chemical addition and hardness precipitation occur in each of two distinct unit clarification processes in series prior to filtration.

(FFFFF) "Volatile organic chemicals" or "VOCs" are the chemicals identified in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code.

(GGGGG) "Waterborne disease outbreak" means the significant occurrence of acute or chronic infectious illness, epidemiologically associated with the ingestion of water from a public water system.

(HHHHH) "Wholesale system" means a public water system that treats source water as necessary to produce finished water and then delivers some or all of that finished water to another public water system. Delivery may be through a direct connection or through the distribution system of one or more consecutive systems.

(IIIII) "Virus" means a virus which is infectious to humans by waterborne transmission.

[Comment: The 40 CFR 141.2 refers to the "Code of Federal Regulations" published on July 1, 2013. A copy of this code may be obtained from the "U.S. Government Bookstore" toll-free at (866) 512-1800 or http://bookstore.gpo.gov [File Link Not Available], or from "Ohio EPA, Lazarus Government Center, 50 West Town Street, Suite 700, Columbus, OH, 43215," (614) 644-2752. The code is available for review at "Ohio EPA, Lazarus Government Center, 50 West Town Street, Suite 700, Columbus, OH, 43215."]

Effective: 06/19/2014
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 03/27/2014 and 06/19/2019
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 8/24/81, 5/22/89, 12/31/90, 9/13/93, 1/1/02, 8/3/04, 8/1/05, 7/24/09, 1/1/10, 10/31/10

3745-81-02 Coverage.

This chapter shall apply to each public water system, unless the public water system meets all of the following conditions:

(A) Consists only of distribution and storage facilities (and does not have any collection and treatment facilities);

(B) Obtains all of its water from, but is not owned or operated by, a public water system to which this chapter applies;

(C) Does not sell water to any person; and

(D) Is not a carrier which conveys passengers in interstate commerce.

Eff 12-27-78
Rule promulgated under: Promulgated under: Section 3, Am. Sub.S.B. 445 112th General Assembly
Rule amplifies: RC 6109.04

3745-81-03 Siting requirements.

Before a person may enter into a financial commitment for or initiate construction of a new public water system or increase the capacity of an existing public water system, he shall notify the director and, to the extent practicable, avoid locating part or all of the new or expanded facility at a site which:

(A) Is subject to a significant risk from earthquakes, floods, fires or other disasters which could cause a breakdown of the public water system or a portion thereof; or

(B) Except for intake structures, is within the floodplain of a one-hundred-year flood or is lower than any recorded high tide where appropriate records exist.

Eff 12-27-78
Rule promulgated under: Promulgated under: Section 3, Am. Sub. S.B.445 112th General Assembly
Rule amplifies: RC 6109.04

3745-81-04 Administrative penalties.

Pursuant to section 6109.23 of the Revised Code, the director may assess and collect administrative penalties from any person who owns or operates a public water system and violates Chapter 6109. of the Revised Code or the administrative rules adopted thereunder. Administrative penalties for a public water system shall be calculated according to this rule in the following manner. Each violation of the public water system shall be assigned a value of one thousand dollars. This amount represents the threat to public health caused by the public water system's failure to comply with the applicable regulations. This value is then multiplied by a number, expressed as a decimal, which represents the public water system's size, in accordance with the following list in order to determine the penalty amount for each day of each violation:

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System size (number of people served) Number

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At least 15 service connections or 25 to 3,300 0.25

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3,301 to 6,700 0.50

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6,701 to 10,000 0.75

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10,001 or more 1.00

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R.C. 119.032 review dates: 01/07/2013 and 01/07/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.23
Rule Amplifies: 6109.23
Prior Effective Dates: 10/1/1999

3745-81-10 Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

(A) Community and nontransient noncommunity public water systems that supply water treated with chlorine and/or chloramines shall comply with the total chlorine MRDL.

(B) Public water systems that treat their water with chlorine dioxide shall comply with the chlorine dioxide MRDL.

(C) Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) are as follows:

Disinfectant residual MRDL (mg/l)

Total chlorine 4.0 (as Cl2).

.................................................

Chlorine dioxide 0.8 (as ClO2).

.............................................

(D) The director identifies the following as the best available technology for achieving compliance with the MRDLs identified in paragraph (C) of this rule: control of treatment processes to reduce disinfectant demand and control of disinfection treatment processes to reduce disinfectant levels.

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/18/2009 and 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 1/1/02

3745-81-11 Maximum contaminant levels and best available technologies for inorganic contaminants.

(A) The following maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for inorganic contaminants apply to all public water systems.

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-11_ph_ff_a_ru_20100210_1119-1.png

(B) The following MCLs for inorganic contaminants apply to all community and nontransient noncommunity public water systems.

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-11_ph_ff_a_ru_20100210_1119-2.png

(C) The following MCL for bromate applies to all community and nontransient noncommunity public water systems that treat their water with ozone.

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-11_ph_ff_a_ru_20100210_1119-3.png

(D) The following MCL for chlorite applies to all community and nontransient noncommunity public water systems that treat their water with chlorine dioxide.

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-11_ph_ff_a_ru_20100210_1119-4.png

(E) The director may determine that a public water system shall apply best available technology in order to reduce the level of a contaminant to below its MCL. The director identifies the following as the best available technologies (BATs) for removal of the following inorganic contaminants from water.

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-11_ph_ff_a_ru_20100210_1119-5.png

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-11_ph_ff_a_ru_20100210_1119-6.png

Effective: 02/22/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 11/24/2009 and 02/22/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 03/01/88, 09/13/93, 01/01/02, 08/01/05

3745-81-12 Maximum contaminant levels and best available technologies for organic contaminants.

(A) The following maximum contaminant levels for total trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids (five) apply to community public water systems and nontransient noncommunity public water systems that supply water treated with any combination of chlorine, chloramines, chorine dioxide or ozone. Compliance with the maximum contaminant levels of total trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids (five) is calculated according to rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code. The director identifies the following as the best available technology(BAT), for achieving compliance with the maximum contaminant levels for organic disinfection byproducts identified in this table until the applicable compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-12_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(B) The director identifies the following as the best available technology (BAT), for achieving compliance with the maximum contaminant levels for organic disinfection byproducts identified in this table beginning on the applicable compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-12_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(C) The director identifies the following as the best technology, treatment techniques, or other means available for achieving compliance with the maximum contaminant levels for TTHM and HAA5 identified in this rule for consecutive systems and applies only to the disinfected water that consecutive systems buy or otherwise receive:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-12_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(D) The following maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) apply to community public water systems and nontransient noncommunity public water systems. The associated best available technologies (BATs), designated as GAC for granular activated carbon and PTA for packed-tower aeration, identify the best technology, treatment techniques, or other means available for achieving compliance with the stated maximum contaminant levels. The director may determine that a public water system shall apply best available technology in order to reduce the level of a contaminant to below its maximum contaminant level.

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-12_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(E) The following maximum contaminant levels apply to community public water systems and nontransient noncommunity water systems. The associated best available technologies (BATs), designated as GAC for granular activated carbon, PTA for packed-tower aeration, and OX for oxidation with chlorine or ozone, identify the best technology, treatment technique, or other means available for achieving compliance with the stated maximum contaminant levels. The director may determine that a public water system shall apply best available technology in order to reduce the level of a contaminant to below its maximum contaminant level.

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-12_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/18/2009 and 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 8/24/81, 5/22/89, 9/13/93, 1/1/02

3745-81-14 Maximum contaminant levels for microbiological contaminants.

(A) A public water system which monitors with at least forty samples per month is in compliance with the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms when no more than 5.0 per cent of the total number of samples during a month are total coliform-positive.

(B) A public water system which monitors with fewer than forty samples per month is in compliance with the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms when no more than one sample during a month is total coliform-positive.

(C) A public water system is in violation of the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms, and may pose an acute risk to human health, if any repeat sample collected in accordance with rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code is

(1) Fecal coliform-positive, or

(2) Escherichia coli-positive (E. coli-positive), or

(3) Total coliform-positive following a fecal coliform-positive routine sample, or

(4) Total coliform-positive following an E. coli-positive routine sample.

(D) A public water system shall determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms as set forth in paragraphs (A), (B), and (C) of this rule for each period in which the public water system is required to monitor for total coliforms.

(E) A public water system which exceeds any maximum contaminant level for total coliforms set forth in paragraph (A), (B), and (C) of this rule shall:

(1) Report the violation to the director no later than the end of the next business day after the public water system learns of the violation, and

(2) Notify the public in accordance with rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code, and

(3) Determine the source of contamination, and

(4) Eliminate the source of contamination.

(F) The director may determine that a public water system shall apply best available technology in order to reduce the level of a contaminant to below its maximum contaminant level. The best available technology for achieving compliance with the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms as set forth in this rule shall be:

(1) Protection of wells from contamination by coliforms by appropriate placement and construction in accordance with Chapter 3745-9 of the Administrative Code; and

(2) Maintenance of a disinfectant residual throughout the distribution system in accordance with rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code and paragraph (C) of rule 3745-83-01 of the Administrative Code; and

(3) Proper maintenance of the distribution system including appropriate pipe replacement and repair procedures, main flushing programs, proper operation and maintenance of storage tanks and reservoirs, continual maintenance of positive water pressure in all parts of the distribution system, and backflow prevention as described in Chapter 3745-95 of the Administrative Code; and

(4) Filtration and disinfection by public water systems using surface water, in whole or in part, as required by rules 3745-81-71 to 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code, or disinfection of ground water using strong oxidants such as chlorine, chlorine dioxide, or ozone; and

(5) Where appropriate, the development and implementation of a source water assessment and protection program approved by the director.

R.C. 119.032 review dates: 01/07/2013 and 01/07/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 11/26/80, 3/1/88, 5/22/89, 12/31/90, 9/13/93, 4/1/99, 8/3/04

3745-81-15 Maximum contaminant levels and best available technologies for radionuclide contaminants.

(A) Combined radium-226 and radium-228: the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for combined radium-226 and radium-228 is five picocuries per liter (pCi/L). The combined radium-226 and radium-228 value is determined by the addition of the results of the analysis for radium-226 and the analysis for radium-228.

(B) Gross alpha particle activity: the MCL for gross alpha particle activity (including radium-226 but excluding radon and uranium) is fifteen pCi/L. The gross alpha particle activity value may be adjusted by subtracting the result of the analysis for uranium. If the result for uranium is reported as a mass measurement in micrograms per liter (µg/L), the activity value in pCi/L shall be obtained by multiplying the result with a conversion factor of 0.67 pCi/µg.

(C) Beta particle and photon radioactivity:

(1) The MCL for beta particle and photon radioactivity from man-made radionuclides is an annual dose equivalent of four millirem/year (mrem/yr) to the total body or any internal organ. The annual dose equivalent is determined by converting the running annual average concentration for the radionuclide from pCi/L to mrem/yr (running annual average concentration divided by the dose equivalent for the radionuclide). If two or more radionuclides are present, the sum of their annual dose equivalent to the total body or to any organ shall not exceed four mrem/yr.

(2) The annual dose equivalent for radionuclides may be determined using the conversion table below. For radionuclides not listed, the concentration causing four mrem/yr total body or organ dose equivalents may be obtained from appendix I of the "Implementation Guidance for Radionuclides" dated March 2002 and designated EPA 816-F-00-002.

[Comment: The U.S. EPA documents entitled "Implementation Guidance for Radionuclides" and "Implementation Guidance for Radionuclides Appendices A - J" are available for download from Ohio EPA's internet site at: http://www.epa.state.oh.us/ddagw/pubs.html. Copies of these documents may also be obtained by contacting the Ohio EPA, Division of Drinking and Ground Waters, Lazarus Government Center, 122 South Front Street, Columbus, OH, 43215-3425, phone number 614-644-2752.] Dose Equivalents Assumed to Produce a Total Body or Organ Dose of four mrem/yr

________________________________________________________________

Radionuclide Critical organ pCi per liter

________________________________________________________________

Tritium--------------------- total body------------------------ 20,000

Strontium-89--------------- bone marrow--------------------- 20

Strontium-90--------------- bone marrow--------------------- 8

Iodine-131----------------- Thyroid--------------------------- 3

Cesium-134---------------- Total body----------------------- 80

________________________________________________________________

(D) Uranium: the MCL for uranium is thirty µg/L (activity level of twenty pCi/L). If the result for uranium is reported as an activity measurement in pCi/L, the mass in µg/L shall be obtained by multiplying the result with a conversion factor of 1.49 µg/pCi.

(E) The director may determine that a public water system shall apply best available technology in order to reduce the level of a contaminant to below its MCL. The director hereby identifies the following technologies, treatment techniques, or other means as the best available technologies (BATs) for removal of the following radionuclide contaminants from water.

________________________________________________________________

Contaminant BATs

Combined radium-226 and 1a, 2b, 3c, 4d, 5e, 6, 7f

radium-228

Gross alpha particle activity 2b

(excluding Radon and Uranium)

Beta particle and photon 1a, 2b

radioactivity

Uranium 1a, 2b, 3c, 8a, g, 9h

________________________________________________________________

Key to BATs in table:

1 = Ion exchange

2 = Reverse Osmosis

3 = Lime softening

4 = Green sand filtration

5 = Co-precipitation with barium sulfate

6 = Electrodialysis/electrodialysis reversal

7 = Pre-formed hydrous manganese oxide filtration

8 = Activated alumina

9 = Enhanced coagulation/filtration

Limitations Footnotes:

a The regeneration solution contains high concentrations of the contaminant ions. Disposal options should be carefully considered before choosing this technology.

b Reject water disposal options and other reverse osmosis limitations should be carefully considered before choosing this technology.

c This technology should not be used for public water systems serving a population of five hundred or less.

d Removal efficiencies can vary depending on water quality.

e This technology may be very limited in application to small systems. Since the process requires static mixing, detention basins, and filtration, it is most applicable to the systems with sufficiently high sulfate levels that already have a suitable filtration treatment train in place.

f This technology is most applicable to small systems that already have filtration in place.

g Competing anion concentrations may affect regeneration frequency. Handling of chemicals required during regeneration and pH adjustment may be too difficult for small systems without an adequately trained operator.

h Assumes modification to a coagulation/filtration process already in place.

Replaces: 3745-81-15 and 3745-81-16

Eff 12-27-78; Rescinded and reenacted eff. 9-15-04
Rule promulgated under: RC 119.03
Rule authorized by: RC 6109.04
Rule amplifies: RC 6109.04
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/03/2009 and 08/03/2014

3745-81-16 Maximum contaminant levels for beta particle and photon radioactivity from man-made radionuclides in community water systems. [Rescinded].

Rescinded eff 9-15-04

3745-81-17 Treatment techniques.

(A) This rule establishes treatment techniques in lieu of maximum contaminant levels for specified contaminants.

(B) Treatment techniques for acrylamide and epichlorohydrin. Each public water system utilizing polymers containing acrylamide or epichlorohydrin shall certify annually in writing to the director (using third-party or manufacturer's certification) that when polymers containing acrylamide or epichlorohydrin are used in the drinking water system, the combination (or product) of dose and monomer level does not exceed either of the levels specified as follows:

Acrylamide monomer level of 0.05 per cent in polymers added to water at 1 part per million (or equivalent), or

Epichlorohydrin monomer level of 0.01 per cent in polymers added to water at 20 parts per million (or equivalent).

Certifications can rely on manufacturers or third parties, as approved by the director.

Eff 9-13-93
Rule promulgated under: RC Chapter 119.
Rule amplifies: RC 6109.04

3745-81-19 Use of bottled water and point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment devices.

(A) Public water systems shall not use bottled water to achieve compliance with the requirements of this chapter. Upon approval of the director, bottled water may be used on a temporary basis to avoid an increased risk to health from contaminant levels exceeding the maximum contaminant level (MCL). The bottled water shall be of a quality acceptable to the director.

(B) Except as provided below, a public water system may not use point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment devices to achieve compliance with a MCL. A nontransient noncommunity public water system may use a point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment device to achieve compliance with the MCL for arsenic if the following conditions are met:

(1) Point-of-use and point-of-entry treatment devices shall be owned, controlled, and maintained by the public water system, or by a person under contract with the public water system, to ensure proper operation and maintenance and compliance with the arsenic maximum contaminant level.

(2) Before any new point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment devices are installed for compliance with the arsenic MCL, or any existing point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment devices are used for compliance with the arsenic MCL, the public water system shall obtain approval of detail plans in accordance with Chapter 3745-91 of the Administrative Code. Chemical and microbiological analyses for constituents that may affect the performance or maintenance of the proposed point-of-entry or point-of-use device must be performed on water entering the treatment device and reported in the detail plans. Results of samples collected more than twelve months prior to plan submittal may not be accepted. Detail plans shall include data from an acceptable demonstration study and a monitoring plan which ensures that the treatment devices provide health protection equivalent to that provided by central water treatment. "Equivalent" means that the water would meet all primary drinking water regulations and would be of acceptable quality similar to water distributed by a well operated central treatment plant. Detail plans shall describe how the system design shall ensure that water of increased corrosivity shall not be released to the drinking water distribution system. The monitoring plan shall include at least the following parts:

(a) Description of and schedule for the recording of physical measurements and observations such as total flow treated and mechanical condition of the treatment equipment.

(b) An explanation of how consumers will be educated as to which taps are suitable for ingestion.

(c) The location of treatment devices and sampling points, and the frequency of sample collection for arsenic analysis. At least one treatment device (or a minimum of twenty-five per cent of treatment devices) shall be sampled for arsenic each quarter unless otherwise approved by the director. Each treatment device shall be sampled at least once annually.

(d) A schedule to collect any additional data required by the director to demonstrate consistency of treatment performance of the point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment device.

(3) The public water system must apply effective technology under a plan approved by the director. The microbiological safety of the water must be maintained at all times.

(4) The design and application of any point-of-entry or point-of-use treatment device shall consider the potential for increase in bacteria concentrations in water treated with activated carbon. It may be necessary to use frequent backwashing, post-contactor disinfection, and bacteria monitoring to ensure the microbiological safety of the water is not compromised.

(5) The public water system shall ensure that all buildings connected to the system have sufficient point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment devices that are properly installed, maintained, and monitored such that all consumers will be protected. Public water systems using point-of-use technology must install devices at every tap where common practice is to obtain water for ingestion.

(6) All point-of-use and point-of-entry treatment devices shall be equipped with mechanical warnings that automatically alert consumers of operational problems.

(7) The point-of-entry or point-of-use treatment device shall be certified by an accredited "American National Standards Institute" (ANSI) certification program for drinking water treatment units in accordance with one of the following "American National Standards Institute/National Sanitation Foundation" (ANSI/NSF) standards: standard 58 "Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water Treatment Systems 58-2007 (October 22, 2007)"; standard 62 "Drinking Water Distillation Systems 62-2004 (March 16, 2004)"; or standard 53 "Drinking Water Treatment Units-Health Effects 53-2007a (July 10, 2007)".

(8) Maintenance of the treatment device shall occur according to manufacturers suggestions, or at an interval determined during a demonstration period, whichever time period is shorter.

(9) Upon failure of the point-of-entry or point-of-use treatment device, all repairs or replacements must be completed as soon as practical, but no later than fourteen days after the failure.

(10) The point-of-entry or point-of-use treatment device must be operational at all times to provide water that meets the arsenic standard at required taps.

(a) Under temporary circumstances during required maintenance of the point-of-entry or point-of-use treatment device or equipment failure, bottled water may be required to be provided as specified in paragraph (A) of this rule for a period not to exceed fourteen days.

(b) At any time a point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment device is not operating due to maintenance or failure of the device, a notice shall be posted at any tap served by that device. The notice shall inform consumers that the water from that tap is not suitable for ingestion due to elevated arsenic concentration and direct them to alternative taps or sources that are suitable for ingestion.

(11) Maintenance records of all treatment devices must be maintained for three years and available for review during a sanitary survey.

[Comment: This rule adopts the ANSI/NSF standards 53, 58, and 62 by reference. Copies may be obtained from "NSF International, 789 Dixboro Road, P.O. Box 130140, Ann Arbor, MI 48113-0140, (734) 769-8010", www.nsf.org. These documents are available for review at the "Ohio EPA Lazarus Government Center, 50 West Town Street, Suite 700, Columbus, OH 43215".]

[Comment: This rule references the ANSI accreditation program for third party certification of drinking water units. A list of ANSI accredited third party product certification programs may be obtained from the "American National Standards Institute, 25 West 43rd Street, New York, NY 10036, (212) 642-4900" or www.ansi.org.]

Effective: 02/22/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 11/24/2009 and 02/22/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 08/01/05

3745-81-21 Coliform monitoring requirements.

(A) Public water systems shall collect total coliform routine samples at sites which are representative of water throughout the distribution system according to a written sample siting plan. Such plans are subject to review and revision by the director. Samples for determination of compliance with this chapter shall be analyzed in a laboratory holding valid certification to analyze drinking water for microbiological contaminants under Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code. The samples shall be analyzed by one or more of the approved methods listed in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code.

(1)

(a) The minimum monitoring frequency for total coliforms for community water systems is based on the population served by the community water system, except as provided for in paragraphs (A)(1)(b) and (A)(4) of this rule, as follows:

Population served Minimum number of samples per month

Less than or equal to 1,000 1

1,001 to 2,500 2

2,501 to 3,300 3

3,301 to 4,100 4

4,101 to 4,900 5

4,901 to 5,800 6

5,801 to 6,700 7

6,701 to 7,600 8

7,601 to 8,500 9

8,501 to 12,900 10

12,901 to 17,200 15

17,201 to 21,500 20

21,501 to 25,000 25

25,001 to 33,000 30

33,001 to 41,000 40

41,001 to 50,000 50

50,001 to 59,000 60

59,001 to 70,000 70

70,001 to 83,000 80

83,001 to 96,000 90

96,001 to 130,000 100

130,001 to 220,000 120

220,001 to 320,000 150

320,001 to 450,000 180

450,001 to 600,000 210

600,001 to 780,000 240

780,001 to 970,000 270

970,001 to 1,230,000 300

1,230,001 to 1,520,000 330

1,520,001 to 1,850,000 360

1,850,001 to 2,270,000 390

2,270,001 to 3,020,000 420

3,020,001 to 3,960,000 450

3,960,001 or more 480

(b) A community water system using a surface water source, in whole or in part, serving fewer than three thousand three hundred one persons shall monitor at regular intervals for total coliforms no less than four times per month.

(2)

(a) A non-community water system using only ground water or purchased water and serving not more than one thousand persons shall monitor with at least one sample each calendar quarter that the non-community water system provides water to the public.

(b) A non-community water system using only ground water and serving more than one thousand persons during any month shall monitor at the same frequency as a community water system serving the same number of persons, as specified in paragraph (A)(1)(a) of this rule.

(c) A non-community water system using a surface water source, in whole or in part, and serving a population of greater than four thousand one hundred persons shall monitor at the same frequency as a community water system serving the same number of persons, as specified in paragraph (A)(1)(a) of this rule. A non-community water system using surface water, in whole or in part, serving a population of fewer than four thousand one hundred one persons shall monitor at least four times per month for any month the non-community water system serves water to the public.

(3) Public water systems shall monitor with samples taken at regular time intervals throughout the month in accordance with the system's sample siting plan.

(4) Special purpose samples, such as those taken to determine whether disinfection practices are sufficient following pipe placement, replacement, or repair, shall not be used to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms as set forth in rule 3745-81-14 of the Administrative Code. The special purpose samples shall be marked as such before analysis. Repeat samples taken pursuant to paragraph (B) of this rule are not considered special purpose samples, and shall be used to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms as set forth in rule 3745-81-14 of the Administrative Code.

(5) Based on the results of a sanitary survey, the director may increase the frequency of total coliform monitoring. On the basis of subsequent sanitary surveys, the increased monitoring frequency may be reduced. Under no circumstances shall the required monitoring be less than that prescribed by this rule.

(B)

(1) When a routine sample is determined to be total coliform-positive, the public water system shall monitor with a set of four repeat samples within twenty-four hours of being notified of the positive result. Upon a request from a public water system, the director may extend the twenty-four-hour limit on a case-by-case basis when the public water system has a logistical problem collecting the repeat samples within twenty-four hours which is beyond the control of the public water system. When an extension is granted by the director, the director shall specify how much time the public water system has to monitor with repeat samples.

(2) The public water system shall monitor with at least one repeat sample from the sampling tap where the original total coliform-positive sample was taken, and at least one repeat sample at a tap within five service connections upstream and at least one repeat sample at a tap within five service connections downstream of the original sampling site. The fourth repeat sample shall be collected within five service connections upstream or downstream of the original sampling site. When a total coliform-positive sample was taken at an end of the distribution system or one service connection away from an end of the distribution system, the director may waive the requirement to monitor with at least one repeat sample upstream or downstream of the original sampling site.

(3) Public water systems shall collect all total coliform repeat samples on the same day.

(4) When one or more repeat sample(s) in the set is total coliform-positive, the public water system shall continue to monitor with an additional set(s) of repeat samples in the manner specified in paragraphs (B)(1) to (B)(3) of this rule until total coliforms are not detected in one complete set of repeat samples or the system determines that the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms in rule 3745-81-14 of the Administrative Code has been exceeded and notifies the director no later than the end of the next business day after the public water system learns of the violation.

(5) Failure to monitor and report required repeat samples is a monitoring and reporting violation, for which public notification shall be issued in accordance with rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code.

(6) Public notification issued as a result of a violation in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-14 of the Administrative Code or paragraph (B)(5) of this rule, and which may cause an acute risk to human health, shall remain in effect until total coliforms are not detected in one complete set of repeat samples.

(7) When a public water system monitoring with fewer than five routine samples per month has one or more total coliform-positive samples, the public water system shall monitor with at least five routine samples during the next month that the public water system provides water to the public. The director shall not waive the requirement for a public water system to collect repeat samples in paragraphs (B)(1) to (B)(4) of this rule.

(8) After a public water system monitors with a routine sample and before the public water system learns the results of the analysis of that sample, when the public water system collects another routine sample(s) from within five adjacent service connections of the initial sample, and the initial sample, after analysis, is found to contain total coliforms, then the public water system may consider the subsequent sample(s) as a repeat sample(s) instead of as a routine sample(s).

(9) When a routine or repeat total coliform sample is analyzed by a membrane filter technique and produces a high background count (HBC) or confluent growth, the HBC or confluent growth culture shall be further analyzed for total coliforms in accordance with a method included in the membrane filter techniques referred to in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code. Gas production of any amount in the inner fermentation tube of brilliant green lactose bile broth indicates a positive coliform test. When an HBC or confluent growth culture is analyzed for total coliforms and none are found, the sample shall be considered invalid and the public water system shall monitor with a replacement sample within twenty-four hours of being notified of the invalid sample. Upon a request from a public water system, the director may extend the twenty-four-hour limit on a case-by-case basis when the public water system has a logistical problem collecting the repeat samples within twenty-four hours which is beyond the control of the public water system. When an extension is granted by the director, the director shall specify how much time the public water system has to monitor with repeat samples.

(C) If any routine or repeat sample is total coliform-positive, that total coliform-positive culture shall be further analyzed to determine if fecal coliforms are present, except that the culture may be tested for Escherichia coli) in lieu of fecal coliforms. If fecal coliforms or E. coli are present, the system shall notify the director by the end of the day when the system is notified of the test result, unless the system is notified of the result after the director's office is closed, in which case the system shall notify the director before the end of the next business day. All repeat sample results shall be submitted no later than the end of the next business day following analysis.

(D) Failure to comply with a coliform monitoring requirement, as set forth in this rule, is a monitoring violation. A public water system which has failed to comply with a coliform monitoring requirement, as set forth in this rule, shall report the monitoring violation to the director within ten days after the public water system discovers the violation, and notify the public in accordance with rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code.

R.C. 119.032 review dates: 01/07/2013 and 01/07/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04 , 6109.12
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 12/31/90, 9/13/93, 4/1/99

3745-81-22 Initial distribution system evaluations.

This rule establishes the requirements to identify sampling points for determining compliance with maximum contaminant levels for total trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (five) (HAA5) in accordance with paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code. An initial distribution system evaluation(IDSE) is used to determine locations with representative high TTHM and HAA5 concentrations throughout a distribution system. IDSEs are used in conjunction with, but separate from, paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code compliance monitoring, to identify and select compliance sampling points for use to meet the monitoring requirements of paragraph (D) of rule 3754-81-24 of the Administrative Code. For the purposes of this rule,"director" means the primacy agency at the time of the requirement.

(A) The requirements of this rule apply to all community water systems that use a primary or residual disinfectant other than ultraviolet light or deliver water that has been treated with a primary or residual disinfectant other than ultraviolet light, and nontransient noncommunity water systems which serve at least ten thousand people and use a primary or residual disinfectant other than ultraviolet light or deliver water that has been treated with a primary or residual disinfectant other than ultraviolet light.

(1) Public water systems specified in paragraph (A) of this rule must comply with the requirements of this rule on the schedule indicated in the following table:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-22_PH_FF_N_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(2) For the purposes of paragraph (A)(1) of this rule, combined distribution systems do not include consecutive systems which receive water from a wholesale system only on an emergency basis or receive only a small percentage and small volume of water from a wholesale system. Combined distribution systems do not include wholesale systems which deliver water to a consecutive system only on an emergency basis or deliver only a small percentage and small volume of water to a consecutive system.

(3) If a public water system is not eligible for either the 40/30 waiver or the very small system waiver under paragraph (D) or (E) of this rule, then the public water system is required to conduct standard monitoring according to paragraph (B) of this rule or a system specific study according to paragraph (C) of this rule.

(4) Public water systems must conduct standard monitoring that meets the requirements in paragraph (B) of this rule, or a system specific study that meets the requirements in paragraph (C) of this rule, or certify to the director that the public water system meets the 40/30 certification criteria under paragraph (D) of this rule, or qualify for a very small system waiver under paragraph (E) of this rule.

(5) Only the analytical methods specified in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, or otherwise approved by the United States environmental protection agency for monitoring under this rule, must be used to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of this rule.

(6) IDSE results will not be used for the purpose of determining compliance with MCLs in rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code.

(B) Standard monitoring:

(1) A standard monitoring plan must comply with paragraphs (B)(1)(a) to (B)(1)(d) of this rule. A public water system must prepare and submit a standard monitoring plan to the director according to the schedule in paragraph (A)(1) of this rule.

(a) A standard monitoring plan must include a distribution system schematic (including distribution system entry points and their sources and storage facilities), with notes indicating locations and dates of all projected standard monitoring, and all projected compliance monitoring required in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(b) Standard monitoring plans must include justification of standard monitoring location selection and a summary of data relied upon to justify standard monitoring location selection.

(c) Standard monitoring plans must specify the population served and system type (surface water or ground water).

(d) Public water systems must retain a complete copy of the standard monitoring plan submitted under paragraph (B) of this rule, including any modification by the director of the standard monitoring plan, for as long as required by paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-33 of the Administrative Code.

(2) Standard monitoring.

(a) Public water systems must monitor as indicated in the following table. Public water systems must collect dual sample sets at each monitoring location. One sample in the dual sample set must be analyzed for TTHM. The other sample in the dual sample set must be analyzed for HAA5. Public water systems must conduct one monitoring period during the peak historical month for TTHM levels or HAA5 levels or the month of warmest water temperature. Public water systems must review available compliance, study, or operational data to determine the peak historical month for TTHM or HAA5 levels or warmest water temperature.

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-22_PH_FF_N_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(b) Public water systems must take samples at locations other than the existing monitoring locations in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code. Monitoring locations must be distributed throughout the distribution system.

(c) If the number of entry points to the distribution system is fewer than the specified number of entry point monitoring locations, excess entry point samples must be replaced equally at high TTHM and HAA5 locations. If there is an odd extra location number, public water systems must take a sample at a high TTHM location. If the number of entry points to the distribution system is more than the specified number of entry point monitoring locations, public water systems must take samples at entry points to the distribution system having the highest annual water flows.

(d) Monitoring under paragraph (B)(2) of rule 3745-81-22 of the Administrative Code may not be reduced under the provisions of rule 3745-81-29 of the Administrative Code.

(3) IDSE report.

(a) The IDSE report must include the elements required in paragraphs (B)(3)(a)(i) to (B)(3)(a)(iv) of this rule. The IDSE report must be submitted to the director according to the schedule in paragraph (A)(1) of this rule.

(i) The IDSE report must include all TTHM and HAA5 analytical results collected during the period of the IDSE. Public water systems must include both compliance monitoring results taken in accordance with paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code and all results from standard monitoring conducted as part of the IDSE. Results must be presented in a tabular or spreadsheet format acceptable to the director and must include individual analytical results and locational running annual averages. If the public water system has undergone changes in the distribution system, population, or system type(surface water or ground water) from the standard monitoring plan submitted under paragraph (B)(1) of this rule, the IDSE report must also include an updated distribution system schematic.

(ii) The IDSE report must include an explanation of any deviations from the approved standard monitoring plan.

(iii) The public water system must recommend and justify compliance monitoring locations for paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code and timing based on the protocol in paragraph (F) of this rule.

(iv) The public water system must retain a complete copy of the IDSE report submitted under this rule for as long as required in paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-33 of the Administrative Code. If the director modifies monitoring requirements that were recommended in the IDSE report required in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, or if the director approves alternative monitoring locations, the public water system must keep a copy of the director's notification on file for ten years after the date of the director's notification. The public water system must make the IDSE report and any director notification available for review by the director or the public.

(C) System specific studies.

(1) System specific study plan. System specific study plans must be based on either existing monitoring results as required under paragraph (C)(1)(a) of this rule or modeling as required under paragraph (C)(2) of this rule. The system specific study plan must be prepared and submitted to the director according to the schedule in paragraph (A)(1) of this rule.

(a) Existing monitoring results. A public water system may comply by submitting monitoring results collected before public water systems are required to begin monitoring under paragraph (A)(1) of this rule. The monitoring results and analysis must meet the criteria in paragraphs (C)(1)(b)(i) and (C)(1)(b)(ii) of this rule.

(b) Minimum requirements.

(i) TTHM and HAA5 results must be based on samples collected and analyzed in accordance with rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code. Samples must be collected no earlier than five years prior to the study plan submission date.

(ii) The monitoring locations and frequency must meet the conditions identified in this paragraph. Each location must be sampled once during the peak historical month for TTHM levels or HAA5 levels or the month of warmest water temperature for every twelve months of data submitted for that location. Monitoring results must include all compliance monitoring results required in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, plus additional monitoring results as necessary to meet minimum sample requirements.

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-22_PH_FF_N_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(c) Reporting monitoring results. Public water systems must report the information in paragraphs (C)(1)(c)(i) to (C)(1)(c)(vi) of this rule.

(i) Public water systems must report previously collected monitoring results and certify that the reported monitoring results include all compliance and non-compliance results generated during the time period beginning with the first reported result and ending with the most recent results required by paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(ii) Public water systems must certify that the samples were representative of the entire distribution system and that treatment and the distribution system have not changed significantly since the samples were collected.

(iii) The monitoring plan must include a schematic of the distribution system (including distribution system entry points and their sources, and storage facilities), with notes indicating the locations and dates of all completed or planned system specific study monitoring.

(iv) The system specific study plan must specify the population served and system type (surface water or ground water).

(v) The public water system must retain a complete copy of the submitted system specific study plan, including any modification by the director of the system specific study plan, for as long as required by paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-33 of the Administrative Code.

(vi) If a public water system submits previously collected data that fully meet the number of samples required under paragraph (C)(1)(b)(ii) of this rule, and the director rejects some of the data, the public water system must either conduct additional monitoring to replace rejected data on a schedule the director approves or conduct standard monitoring required by paragraph (B) of this rule.

(2) Modeling. A public water system may comply through analysis of an extended period simulation hydraulic model. The extended period simulation hydraulic model and analysis must meet the criteria in paragraph (C)(2) of this rule.

(a) Minimum requirements.

(i) The model must simulate twenty-four hour variation in demand and show a consistently repeating twenty-four hour pattern of residence time.

(ii) The model must represent the following criteria: seventy-five per cent of pipe volume; fifty per cent of pipe length; all pressure zones; all twelve inch diameter and larger pipes; all eight inch and larger pipes that connect pressure zones, influence zones from different sources, storage facilities, major demand areas, pumps, and control valves, or are known or expected to be significant conveyors of water; all six inch and larger pipes that connect remote areas of a distribution system to the main portion of the system; all storage facilities with standard operations represented in the model; all active pump stations with controls represented in the model; and all active control valves.

(iii) The model must be calibrated, or have calibration plans, for the current configuration of the distribution system during the period of high TTHM formation potential. All storage facilities must be evaluated as part of the calibration process. All required calibration must be completed no later than twelve months after plan submission.

(b) Reporting modeling. The system specific study plan must include the information in this paragraph. Public water systems submitting system specific study plans must include tabular or spreadsheet data demonstrating that the model meets requirements in paragraphs (C)(2)(a) of this rule.

(i) A description of all calibration activities undertaken, and if calibration is complete, a graph of predicted tank levels versus measured tank levels for the storage facility with the highest residence time in each pressure zone and a time series graph of the residence time at the longest residence time storage facility in the distribution system showing the predictions for the entire simulation period (i.e., from time zero until the time it takes to for the model to reach a consistently repeating pattern of residence time).

(ii) Model output showing preliminary twenty-four hour average residence time predictions throughout the distribution system.

(iii) Timing and number of samples representative of the distribution system planned for at least one monitoring period of TTHM and HAA5 dual sample monitoring at a number of locations no less than would be required for the system under standard monitoring in paragraph (B) of this rule during the historical month of high TTHM. These samples must be taken at locations other than existing compliance monitoring locations required by paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(iv) Description of how all requirements will be completed no later than twelve months after submission of the system specific study plan.

(v) Schematic of the distribution system (including distribution system entry points and their sources, and storage facilities), with notes indicating the locations and dates of all completed system specific study monitoring (if calibration is complete) and all compliance monitoring required by paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(vi) Population served and system type (surface water or ground water).

(vii) The public water system must retain a complete copy of the submitted system specific study plan, including any modification by the director of the system specific study plan, for as long as required by paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-33 of the Administrative Code.

(c) If a public water system submits a model that does not fully meet the requirements in paragraph (C)(2) of this rule, the public water system must correct the deficiencies and respond to the director's inquiries concerning the model. If the public water system fails to correct deficiencies or respond to inquiries to the director's satisfaction, the public water system must conduct standard monitoring required by paragraph (B) of this rule.

(3) IDSE report. The IDSE report must include the elements required in paragraphs (C)(3)(a) to (C)(3)(g) of this rule. Public water systems must submit the IDSE report according to the schedule in paragraph (A)(1) of this rule.

(a) The IDSE report must include all TTHM and HAA5 analytical results from compliance monitoring required by paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, and all system specific study monitoring conducted during the period of the system specific study presented in a tabular or spreadsheet format acceptable to the director. If changed from the system specific study plan submitted under paragraph (C) of this rule, the IDSE report must also include a schematic of the distribution system, the population served, and system type(surface water or ground water).

(b) If a public water system used the modeling provision under paragraph (C)(2) of this rule, the public water system must include final information for the elements described in paragraph (C)(2)(b) of this rule, and a twenty-four hour time series graph of residence time for each compliance monitoring location selected for paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(c) A public water system must recommend and justify compliance monitoring locations required by paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, and timing based on the protocol in paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-22 of the Administrative Code.

(d) The IDSE report must include an explanation of any deviations from the approved system specific study plan.

(e) The IDSE report must include the basis (analytical and modeling results) and justification used to select the recommended monitoring locations for paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(f) Public water systems may submit the IDSE report in lieu of the system specific study plan on the schedule identified in paragraph (A)(1) of this rule for submission of the system specific study plan if the public water system believes that they have the necessary information by the time that the system specific study plan is due. If this approach is elected, the IDSE report must also include all information required in paragraph (C)(1) of this rule.

(g) The public water system must retain a complete copy of the IDSE report submitted under this rule for as long as required by paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-33 of the Administrative Code. If the director modifies the monitoring requirements recommended in the IDSE report in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, or if the director approves alternative monitoring locations, the public water system must keep a copy of the director's notification on file for ten years after the date of the director's notification. The public water system must make the IDSE report and any director notification available for review by the director or the public.

(D) 40/30 certification.

(1) Eligibility. A public water system is eligible for 40/30 certification if the system had no TTHM or HAA5 monitoring violations under paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, and no individual sample exceeded 0.040 mg/L for TTHM or 0.030 mg/L for HAA5 during an eight consecutive calendar quarter period beginning no earlier than the date specified in the following table.

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-22_PH_FF_N_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(2) 40/30 certification.

(a) A public water system must certify to the director that every individual compliance sample taken under paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code during the periods specified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule were less than or equal to 0.040 mg/L for TTHM and less than or equal to 0.030 mg/L for HAA5, and that the public water system has not had any TTHM or HAA5 monitoring violations during the period specified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule.

(b) The director may require a public water system to submit compliance monitoring results, distribution system schematics, and/or recommended compliance monitoring locations required by paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, in addition to the certification. If a public water system fails to submit the requested information, the director may require standard monitoring under paragraph (B) of this rule or a system specific study under paragraph (C) of this rule.

(c) The director may still require standard monitoring under paragraph (B) of this rule or a system specific study under paragraph (C) of this rule even if the public water system meets the criteria in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule.

(d) The public water system must retain a complete copy of the certification submitted under this paragraph for ten years after the date that the public water system submitted the certification. The public water system must make the certification, all data upon which the certification is based, and any notification from the director available for review by the director or the public.

(E) Very small system waivers.

(1) If a public water system serves fewer than five hundred people and has taken TTHM and HAA5 samples under paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, the public water system is not required to comply with this rule unless the director notifies the public water system that standard monitoring must be conducted under paragraph (B) of this rule or a system specific study under paragraph (C) of this rule.

(2) If a public water system has not taken TTHM and HAA5 samples under paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, or if the director notifies the public water system that it must comply with this rule, the public water system must conduct standard monitoring under paragraph (B) of this rule or a system specific study under paragraph (C) of this rule.

(F) Compliance monitoring location recommendations for paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(1) The IDSE report must include recommendations and justification for where and during what month(s) TTHM and HAA5 monitoring for paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code should be conducted. The public water system must base the recommendations on the criteria in paragraphs (F)(2) to (F)(5) of this rule.

(2) Public water systems must select the number of monitoring locations specified in the table in this paragraph. The public water system will use these recommended locations as routine compliance monitoring locations required by paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, unless the director requires different or additional locations. The public water system should distribute locations throughout the distribution system to the extent possible.

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-22_PH_FF_N_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(3) The public water system must recommend compliance monitoring locations required in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code based on standard monitoring results, system specific study results, and compliance monitoring results in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code. Public water systems must follow the protocol in paragraphs (F)(3)(a) to (F)(3)(h) of this rule. If required to monitor at more than eight locations, the public water system must repeat the protocol as necessary. If the public water system does not have existing compliance monitoring results required in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, or if the public water system does not have enough existing compliance monitoring results required by paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, the protocol must be repeated, skipping the provisions of paragraphs (F)(3)(c) and (F)(3)(g) of this rule as necessary, until the public water system has identified the required total number of monitoring locations.

(a) Location with the highest TTHM LRAA not previously selected as a monitoring location in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(b) Location with the highest HAA5 LRAA not previously selected as a monitoring location in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(c) Existing average residence time compliance monitoring location required in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code(maximum residence time compliance monitoring location for ground water systems) with the highest HAA5 LRAA not previously selected as a monitoring location in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(d) Location with the highest TTHM LRAA not previously selected as a monitoring location in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(e) Location with the highest TTHM LRAA not previously selected as a monitoring location in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(f) Location with the highest HAA5 LRAA not previously selected as a monitoring location in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(g) Existing average residence time compliance monitoring location required in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code(maximum residence time compliance monitoring location for ground water systems) with the highest TTHM LRAA not previously selected as a monitoring location in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(h) Location with the highest HAA5 LRAA not previously selected as a monitoring location in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(4) A public water system may recommend locations other than those specified in paragraph (F)(3) of this rule if a rationale for selecting other locations is included. If the director approves the alternate locations, the public water system must monitor at these locations to determine compliance under paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(5) The recommended schedule must include monitoring during the peak historical month for TTHM and HAA5 concentration as required by paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, unless the director approves another month. Once the peak historical month is identified, and if the public water system is required to conduct routine monitoring at least quarterly, the public water system must schedule compliance monitoring required by paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code at a regular frequency of every ninety days or fewer.

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04

3745-81-23 Inorganic chemical monitoring requirements.

All public water systems shall monitor as described in paragraphs (B) and (C) of this rule to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for nitrate and nitrite. In addition, all community water systems and all nontransient noncommunity water systems shall monitor as described in paragraphs (D) and (E) of this rule for the inorganic contaminants with MCLs listed in paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code. Public water systems shall monitor inorganic chemicals according to a schedule provided by the director.

(A) Monitoring for inorganic chemicals with MCLs shall be conducted as follows.

(1) Groundwater systems and surface water systems shall monitor with a minimum of one sample at each sampling point. After the initial set of samples, the system shall take each repeat sample at the same sampling point as used before unless conditions make another sampling point more representative of a source or treatment plant.

(2) If a public water system draws water from more than one source and the sources are combined before distribution, the system shall monitor at each sampling point during periods of normal operating conditions and shall keep a record of and report the sources providing water for each sample. When a sample does not contain water from all the sources which serve the sampling point, a schedule prepared by the public water system shall be followed so that the next monitoring sample at this sampling point for the same inorganic chemical(s) will include water from sources not included in the previous sample or samples. Thus, successive samples from the same sampling point for the same inorganic chemical(s) shall sample water supplied from different sources until all of the sources supplying that sampling point have been monitored. Note that when inorganic chemicals have different monitoring periods, they require separate monitoring schedules.

(3) The frequency of monitoring for nitrate shall be according to paragraph (B) of this rule; the frequency of monitoring for nitrite shall be conducted according to paragraph (C) of this rule; the frequency of monitoring for asbestos shall be conducted according to paragraph (D) of this rule; and the frequency of monitoring for antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cyanide, fluoride, mercury, nickel, selenium, and thallium shall be according to paragraph (E) of this rule. The frequency of monitoring for bromate shall be conducted according to paragraph (L) of this rule. The frequency of monitoring for chlorite shall be conducted according to paragraph (M) of this rule.

(B) All public water systems shall monitor to determine compliance with the MCL for nitrate in rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code.

(1) All public water systems which are groundwater systems shall monitor for nitrate annually.

(2) All public water systems which are surface water systems shall monitor for nitrate monthly.

(3) The repeat monitoring frequency for nitrate for public groundwater systems shall be quarterly for at least one year following any one sample in which the concentration is at least fifty per cent of the MCL. The director may reduce the monitoring frequency of a groundwater system to annually after four consecutive quarterly samples are less than eighty per cent of the MCL. If a groundwater system consistently operates less than four quarters per year, then the director may reduce the monitoring frequency to annually after samples collected during each of the system's operating quarters are less than eighty per cent of the MCL.

(4) After the initial round of quarterly repeat monitoring for nitrate is completed, each groundwater system which is monitoring annually shall take subsequent samples during the quarter(s) which previously resulted in the highest analytical result.

(C) All public water systems shall monitor to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level for nitrite in rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code.

(1) All public water systems shall monitor initially for nitrite with one sample at each sampling point.

(2) After the initial sample, public water systems where an analytical result for nitrite is less than fifty per cent of the MCL shall monitor at the frequency specified by the director.

(3) The repeat monitoring frequency for nitrite for public water systems shall be quarterly for at least one year following any one sample in which the concentration is at least fifty per cent of the MCL. The director may reduce the monitoring frequency to annually after a determination that the nitrite concentration for a public water system is less than eighty per cent of the MCL. If a groundwater system consistently operates less than four quarters per year, then the director may reduce the monitoring frequency to annually after samples collected during each of the public water system's operating quarters are less than eighty per cent of the MCL.

(4) After the initial round of quarterly repeat monitoring for nitrite is completed, each public water system which is monitoring annually shall take each subsequent sample during the quarter(s) which previously resulted in the highest analytical result.

(D) The frequency of monitoring conducted by community water systems and nontransient noncommunity water systems to determine compliance with the MCL for asbestos specified in rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code shall be as follows:

(1) Each community and nontransient noncommunity water system shall monitor for asbestos during the first three-year compliance period for each nine-year compliance cycle, except when a waiver is granted.

(2) A public water system vulnerable to asbestos contamination due solely to corrosion of asbestos-cement pipe shall take one sample at a tap served by asbestos-cement pipe and under conditions where asbestos contamination is most likely to occur.

(3) A public water system vulnerable to asbestos contamination due solely to source water shall monitor in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (A) of this rule.

(4) A public water system vulnerable to asbestos contamination due both to its source water supply and corrosion of asbestos-cement pipe shall take one sample at a tap served by asbestos-cement pipe and under conditions where asbestos contamination is most likely to occur.

(5) A public water system which exceeds eighty per cent of the MCL for asbestos as determined in paragraph (H) of this rule shall monitor quarterly beginning in the next quarter after the violation occurred.

(6) The director may decrease the quarterly monitoring requirement for asbestos to the frequency specified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule provided the director has determined that the asbestos concentration for a public water system does not exceed eighty per cent of the MCL. In no case can the director make this determination unless a groundwater system takes a minimum of two quarterly samples or a surface water system takes a minimum of four quarterly samples.

(E) The frequency of monitoring conducted by community water systems and nontransient noncommunity water systems for antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cyanide, fluoride, mercury, nickel, selenium, and thallium to determine compliance with the MCLs in rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code shall be as follows:

(1) Ground water systems shall take and analyze one sample at each sampling point during each compliance period. Surface water systems shall take and analyze one sample annually at each sampling point.

(2) Arsenic sampling results shall be reported to the nearest 0.001 mg/L.

(3) The director may grant a waiver from the monitoring frequencies specified in paragraph (E)(1) of this rule for all of the contaminants listed in paragraph (E) of this rule except fluoride; no waivers shall be granted for fluoride. Waivers for cyanide monitoring may be granted only when the director determines that the public water system is not vulnerable due to any industrial source of cyanide.

(4) Waivers granted under this rule shall require that the public water system monitor with at least one sample while the waiver is in effect. The term during which a waiver is in effect shall not exceed one compliance cycle (i.e., nine years).

(5) Waivers may be granted under this rule only to surface water systems which have monitored annually for at least three years and to groundwater systems which have conducted at least three rounds of monitoring, with at least one monitoring using samples taken after January 1, 1990. Both surface and groundwater systems shall demonstrate that all previous analytical results were less than the MCLs. New public water systems that use a new water source are not eligible for a waiver until three rounds of monitoring of water from the new source have been completed.

(6) In determining the appropriate reduced monitoring frequency, the director shall consider:

(a) Reported concentrations from all previous monitoring;

(b) The degree of variation in reported concentrations; and

(c) Other factors which may affect contaminant concentrations such as changes in groundwater pumping rates, changes in the system's configuration, changes in the system's operating procedures, or changes in stream flows or characteristics.

(7) A decision by the director to grant a waiver shall be made in writing and shall set forth the basis for the determination. The director shall review, and, where appropriate, revise the director's determination of the appropriate monitoring frequency when the system submits new monitoring data or when other data relevant to the system's appropriate monitoring frequency become available.

(8) A public water system, which exceeds eighty per cent of a MCL as calculated in paragraph (H) of this rule, shall monitor quarterly for that contaminant beginning in the next quarter after the result was reported.

(9) A public water system that uses a new source of water or begins operation shall monitor initially for each contaminant listed in paragraph (E) of this rule in the first quarter of the next calendar year after operation of the new source or public water system begins. New public water systems shall sample at each sampling point. Existing public water systems with a new source of water shall sample at the sampling point related to the new source.

(10) If, during the initial sampling required in paragraph (E)(9) of this rule, the analytical result for any inorganic contaminant does not exceed eighty per cent of the MCL in rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code, then the public water system shall monitor for that inorganic contaminant according to the frequency specified in paragraph (E)(1) of this rule, or at a frequency determined by the director.

(11) If, during the initial sampling required in paragraph (E)(9) of this rule, any contaminant is reported as a concentration above eighty per cent of the MCLs listed in rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code, at any sampling point, the public water system shall monitor quarterly for that contaminant at that sampling point beginning in the next quarter after the result is reported.

(12) The director may decrease the quarterly monitoring requirement for one or more inorganic contaminants to the frequency specified in paragraph (E)(1) of this rule, or to a frequency determined by the director, provided the director has determined that the system does not exceed eighty per cent of the MCL. In no case may the director make this determination unless a groundwater system takes a minimum of two quarterly samples and a surface water system takes a minimum of four quarterly samples. The director may also require additional data demonstrating consistency of treatment performance.

(13) Monitoring for arsenic at nontransient noncommunity public water systems which have installed approved point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment devices for arsenic removal in accordance with rule 3745-81-19 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted at sampling point(s) specified in a monitoring plan approval by the director and in accordance with a schedule provided by the director.

(F) Confirmation samples:

(1) Where nitrate or nitrite monitoring indicates an exceedance of the MCL, the director may require the public water system to monitor with a confirmation sample within twenty-four hours of the public water system's receipt of notification of the analytical results of the first sample. Public water systems unable to comply with the twenty-four hour sampling requirement shall immediately notify the consumers in the area served by the public water system in accordance with rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code. Public water systems giving immediate notification shall monitor with a confirmation sample within two weeks of notification of the analytical results of the first sample.

(2) Where the results of monitoring for antimony, arsenic, asbestos, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cyanide, fluoride, mercury, selenium, or thallium indicate an exceedance of a MCL, the director may require that a confirmation sample be collected at the same sampling point as soon as possible (but not to exceed two weeks) after notification of the initial monitoring result.

(3) With confirmation samples required under paragraphs (F)(1) and (F)(2) of this rule, the results of analysis of the initial and confirmation samples shall be averaged. The resulting average shall be used to determine the water system's compliance in accordance with paragraph (H) of this rule.

(4) If a public water system fails to collect the number of samples required in paragraph (F) of this rule, compliance (average concentration) will be based on the total number of samples collected.

(G) The director may require more frequent monitoring than specified in paragraphs (B), (C), (D), and (E) of this rule or may require confirmation samples for positive and negative results at the director's discretion. The director has discretion to delete results of obvious sampling or analytical errors.

(H) Compliance with rule 3745-81-11iftheAdministrativeCode shall be determined based on the analytical result(s) obtained at each sampling point.

(1) Compliance with the MCLs for nitrate and nitrite is determined based on one sample if the levels of these contaminants are below the MCLs. If the levels of nitrate and/or nitrite exceed the MCLs in the initial sample, and a confirmation sample is required in accordance with paragraph (F)(1) of this rule, compliance shall be determined based on the average of the initial and confirmation samples. Failure to take a confirmation sample will result in an MCL violation based on the level of the initial sample.

(2) For public water systems which are conducting monitoring at a frequency greater than annual, compliance with the maximum contaminant levels for antimony, arsenic, asbestos, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cyanide, fluoride, mercury, selenium, and thallium is determined by a running annual average at each sampling point. The public water system will not be considered in violation of the MCL until it has completed one year of quarterly sampling. If, however, any one sample result would cause the running annual average to exceed the MCL, then the public water system is out of compliance immediately. If one sampling point is in violation of the MCL, the system is in violation of the MCL. If a public water system fails to collect the required number of samples, compliance with the MCL (average concentration) will be based on the total number of samples collected. Any sample result below the following method detection limit (MDL) shall be calculated as zero for the purpose of determining the running annual average.

(3) Method detection limits for inorganic contaminants.

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-23_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(4)

(a) For public water systems which are monitoring annually, or less frequently, for antimony, arsenic, asbestos, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cyanide, fluoride, mercury, selenium, or thallium, when the average of a sample collected pursuant to paragraph (E) of this rule and a confirmation sample exceeds eighty per cent of the MCL, the public water system shall begin quarterly sampling at that sampling point. If a confirmation sample was not collected the public water system shall begin quarterly monitoring based on the level of the initial sample.

(b) If a public water system is monitoring annually, or less frequently, for antimony, arsenic, asbestos, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cyanide, fluoride, mercury, selenium, or thallium because of a reduction from quarterly monitoring granted by the director pursuant to paragraph (E)(12) of this rule, the public water system is not required to return to quarterly monitoring unless the sample result exceeds the MCL.

(I) Each public water system shall monitor at the time designated by the director during each compliance period.

(J) Sample collection for antimony, arsenic, asbestos, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cyanide, fluoride, mercury, nickel, nitrate, nitrite, selenium, and thallium under this rule shall be conducted using the sample preservation, container, and maximum holding time procedures specified in the following table:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-22_PH_FF_N_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(K) Analyses conducted to determine compliance with rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code shall be performed in accordance with methods listed in paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code and shall be performed in laboratories approved in accordance with Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code.

(L) All community and nontransient noncommunity public water systems that treat their water with ozone shall monitor to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level for bromate in rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code.

(1) Each public water system required to monitor for bromate shall develop and implement a monitoring plan. This plan shall be maintained and made available for inspection by the director and the general public. All public water systems using surface water as a source and serving more than three thousand three hundred people shall submit a copy of the monitoring plan to the director no later than the date of the first report required under rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code. The director may also require any other public water system to submit such a plan. After review, the director may require changes in any plan elements. The public water system shall modify the plan as required by the director. The plan shall include at least the specific locations and schedules for collecting samples for bromate, and how the public water system will calculate compliance with the MCL for bromate. If a public water system is approved for monitoring as a consecutive system, or provides water to a consecutive system, under the provisions of rule 3745-81-29 of the Administrative Code, its sampling plan must reflect the entire distribution system. Failure to monitor according to the monitoring plan is a monitoring violation.

(2) Public water systems shall take all bromate samples during normal operating conditions.

(3) Routine monitoring for bromate shall be one sample per month for each treatment plant in the system using ozone. The sample shall be taken at the entrance to the distribution system while the ozonation system is operating under normal conditions.

(4) Public water systems may use data collected under the provisions of this rule to qualify for reduced monitoring. Public water systems may use another data set to qualify for reduced monitoring, provided it has been approved by the director.

(5) Reduced monitoring: A system required to analyze for bromate may reduce monitoring from monthly to quarterly, if the system's running annual average bromate concentration is less than or equal to 0.0025 mg/L based on monthly bromate measurements under paragraph (L)(3) of this rule for the most recent four quarters, with samples analyzed in accordance with methods listed in paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code. If a system has qualified for reduced bromate monitoring under this paragraph prior to April 1, 2009, that system may remain on reduced monitoring as long as the running annual average of quarterly bromate samples is less than or equal to 0.0025 mg/L based on samples analyzed in accordance with methods listed in paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code. If the running annual average bromate concentration is greater than 0.0025 mg/L, the system must resume routine monitoring required by paragraph (L)(3) of this rule.

(6) Compliance with the MCL for bromate shall be based on a running annual arithmetic average, computed quarterly, of monthly samples. For months in which the public water system takes more than one sample, the average of all samples taken during the month shall be used to compute the monthly average. These samples shall be collected as prescribed by paragraphs (L)(3) and (L)(5) of this rule.

(7) If the average of samples covering any consecutive four-quarter period exceeds the MCL, the public water system is in violation of the MCL and must notify the public according to rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code. Public notification is in addition to reporting to the director according to rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code.

(8) All samples taken and analyzed under the provisions of paragraphs (L)(3) and (L)(5) of this rule shall be included in determining compliance, even if that number is greater than the minimum required.

(9) If, during the first year of monitoring under paragraph (L)(3) or (L)(5) of this rule, any individual quarter's average will cause the running annual average of that system to exceed the MCL, the public water system is in violation at the end of that quarter.

(10) Failure to complete the required monitoring is a monitoring violation. The public water system will be in violation for the entire period covered by the running annual average. If a public water system fails to complete twelve consecutive months of monitoring, compliance with the MCL for the last four-quarter compliance period shall be based on an average of the available data.

(M) All community and nontransient noncommunity public water systems that treat their water with chlorine dioxide shall monitor to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level for chlorite in rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code.

(1) Each public water system required to monitor for chlorite shall develop and implement a monitoring plan. This plan shall be maintained and made available for inspection by the director and the general public. All public water systems using surface water as a source and serving more than three thousand three hundred people shall submit a copy of the monitoring plan to the director no later than the date of the first report required under rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code. The director may also require any other public water system to submit such a plan. After review, the director may require changes in any plan elements. The public water systems shall modify the plan as required by the director. The plan shall include at least the specific locations and schedules for collecting samples for chlorite, and how the public water system will calculate compliance with the MCL for chlorite. If a public water system is approved for monitoring as a consecutive system, or provides water to a consecutive system, under the provisions of rule 3745-81-29 of the Administrative Code, their sampling plan must reflect the entire distribution system. Failure to monitor according to the monitoring plan is a monitoring violation.

(2) Public water systems shall take all chlorite samples during normal operating conditions.

(3) Routine daily monitoring: public water systems shall take daily chlorite samples at the entrance to the distribution system. For any daily sample that exceeds the chlorite MCL, the system shall take additional samples in the distribution system the following day at the locations required by paragraph (M)(5) of this rule, in addition to the sample required at the entrance to the distribution system.

(4) Routine monthly monitoring: public water systems shall take a three-sample set each month in the distribution system. The system shall take one sample for chlorite at each of the following locations: near the first customer, at a location representative of average residence time, and at a location reflecting maximum residence time of the water in the distribution system. Any additional distribution system sampling shall be conducted in the same manner (as three-sample sets, at the specified locations). The system may use the results of additional monitoring conducted under paragraph (M)(5) of this rule to meet the requirement for monitoring in this paragraph.

(5) Additional monitoring: on each day following a daily sample monitoring result that exceeds the chlorite MCL at the entrance to the distribution system, the public water system is required to take three samples for chlorite in the distribution system. Samples shall be taken at the following locations: near the first customer, at a location representative of average residence time, and at a location reflecting maximum residence time in the distribution system.

(6) Chlorite monitoring at the entrance to the distribution system required by paragraph (M)(3) of this rule may not be reduced.

(7) Public water systems may use data collected under the provisions of this rule to qualify for reduced chlorite monitoring in the distribution system. Public water systems may use another data set to qualify for reduced distribution system monitoring, provided it has been approved by the director.

(8) Chlorite monitoring in the distribution system required by paragraph (M)(4) of this rule may be reduced to one three-sample set per quarter after one year of monitoring where no individual chlorite sample taken in the distribution system under paragraph (M)(4) of this rule has exceeded the chlorite MCL and the system has not been required to conduct monitoring under paragraph (M)(5) of this rule.

(9) The public water system may remain on the reduced monitoring schedule until either any of the three individual chlorite samples taken quarterly in the distribution system under paragraph (M)(8) of this rule exceeds the chlorite MCL or the system is required to conduct monitoring under paragraph (M)(5) of this rule, at which time the system must revert to routine monitoring.

(10) Compliance with the MCL for chlorite shall be based on an arithmetic average of each three-sample set taken in the distribution system as prescribed by paragraphs (M)(4) and (M)(5) of this rule. All samples taken and analyzed under the provisions of paragraphs (M)(4) and (M)(5) of this rule shall be included in determining compliance, even if that number is greater than the minimum required. If the arithmetic average of any three-sample set exceeds the MCL, the system is in violation of the MCL and must notify the public according to rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code, in addition to reporting to the director according to rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code.

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/18/2009 and 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 03/29/88, 05/22/89, 09/13/93, 04/01/96, 01/01/02, 01/01/03, 08/01/05

3745-81-24 Organic chemical monitoring requirements.

Monitoring requirements for organic chemical contaminants of drinking water are stated in this rule. Analytical procedures which are acceptable for monitoring for organic contaminants in drinking water are listed in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code. Analyses under this rule shall only be conducted by laboratories that are certified for these analyses under Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code. Community public water systems and nontransient noncommunity public water systems shall monitor for organic chemicals according to a schedule provided by the director.

(A) Monitoring for volatile organic chemicals with maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) listed in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted by community public water systems and nontransient noncommunity public water systems as follows:

(1) Groundwater systems shall monitor with a minimum of one sample at each respective sampling point during each compliance period. Surface water systems shall monitor with a minimum of one sample annually at each sampling point. After the first set of samples, each repeat sample shall be taken at the same sampling point as used before unless conditions make another sampling point more representative of a source, treatment plant, or part of the distribution system.

(2) If a public water system draws water from more than one source and the sources are combined before distribution, the public water system shall monitor at each sampling point during periods of normal operating conditions and shall keep a record of and report the sources providing water for each sample. When a sample does not contain water from all the sources which serve the sampling point, the public water system shall prepare and follow a schedule such that the next monitoring sample at this sampling point for the same volatile organic chemicals will include water from sources not included in the previous sample or samples. Thus, successive samples from the same sampling point for the same volatile organic chemicals shall sample water supplied from different sources until all the sources supplying that sampling point have been monitored.

(3) Each new community and new nontransient noncommunity public water system and public water systems that use a new source of water shall monitor initially with four consecutive quarterly samples for each contaminant listed in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code beginning in the first quarter of the next calendar year after operation of the new source of system begins. New public water systems shall sample at each sampling point; systems with a new source of water shall sample at the sampling point related to the new source.

(4) If the initial monitoring for the contaminants listed in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code has been completed and the public water system did not detect any contaminant listed in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code, then the public water system shall monitor with one sample annually. For any contaminant detected during the initial monitoring, the public water system shall continue quarterly monitoring until eligible for a reduction under paragraph (A)(6)(b) of this rule.

(5) The director may, after a minimum of three years of annual monitoring with no detection of any contaminant listed in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code, reduce monitoring by a groundwater system to one sample during each compliance period.

(6) If a contaminant listed in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code is detected at a level exceeding 0.0005 milligram per liter in any sample, then:

(a) The public water system shall monitor quarterly at each sampling point which resulted in a detection. If a public water system is monitoring annually or less frequently for a previously detected contaminant, then the public water system does not have to return to quarterly monitoring for that contaminant unless the sample result exceeds eighty per cent of the MCL.

(b) The director may decrease the quarterly monitoring requirement specified in paragraph (A)(6)(a) of this rule to annual monitoring provided the director has determined that the public water system does not exceed eighty per cent of the MCL for that contaminant. In no case shall the director make this determination unless a groundwater system has monitored with a minimum of two consecutive quarterly samples and a surface water system has monitored with a minimum of four consecutive quarterly samples.

(c) Public water systems which monitor annually for a previously detected contaminant shall monitor during the quarter(s) which previously yielded the highest analytical result.

(7) The director may require a confirmation sample for positive or negative results. If a confirmation sample is required by the director, the result shall be averaged with the first sampling result and the average used for the compliance determination as specified by paragraph (A)(8) of this rule.

(8) Compliance with paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code shall be determined based on the analytical results obtained at each sampling point.

(a) For public water systems which are conducting monitoring at a frequency greater than annually, compliance is determined by a running annual average of all samples taken at each sampling point. If the running annual average of any sampling point is greater than the MCL, then the public water system is out of compliance. The system will not be considered in violation of the MCL until it has completed one year of quarterly sampling. If, however, the initial sample or a subsequent sample would cause the running annual average to exceed the MCL, then the public water system is out of compliance immediately. Any samples below the detection limit shall be counted as zero for purposes of determining the running annual average.

(b) For public water systems monitoring annually or less frequently, when the average of a result and a required confirmation sample exceeds eighty per cent of the MCL, the public water system shall begin quarterly monitoring at that sample point. If a confirmation sample was not collected, the public water system shall begin quarterly monitoring if the level of the initial sample exceeds eighty per cent of the MCL. Compliance with a MCL will be determined by a running annual average as stated in paragraph (A)(8)(a) of this rule. If one sampling point is in violation of the MCL, the system is in violation of the MCL.

(c) If a public water system fails to collect the required number of samples, compliance will be based on the total number of samples collected.

(9) Analysis for the contaminants listed in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted using the methods in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code.

(10) Analysis under this rule shall only be conducted by laboratories that are approved under Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code.

(11) The director has discretion to delete results of obvious sampling or analytical errors.

(12) The director may increase required monitoring where necessary to detect variations within the public water system.

(13) Each approved laboratory shall determine the method detection limit (MDL), as defined in the appendix to rule 3745-89-03 of the Administrative Code, at which it is capable of detecting volatile organic chemicals. The acceptable MDL is 0.0005 milligram per liter. This concentration is the detection concentration for purposes of this rule.

(B) Monitoring of the organic chemical contaminants with maximum contaminant levels listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted by community public water systems and nontransient noncommunity public water systems as described below.

(1) Groundwater systems and surface water systems shall monitor with a minimum of one sample at each sampling point each time monitoring is required in paragraph (B) of this rule. After the initial set of samples, each sample shall be taken at the same sampling point as used before unless conditions make another sampling point more representative of a source or treatment plant.

(2) If the public water system draws water from more than one source and the sources are combined before distribution, the public water system shall monitor at each sampling point during periods of normal operating conditions and shall keep a record of and report the sources providing water for each sample. When a sample does not contain water from all the sources which serve the sampling point, a schedule prepared by the public water system shall be followed so that the next monitoring sample at this sampling point for the same organic chemical(s) will include water from sources not included in the previous sample or samples. Thus, successive samples from the same sampling point for the same organic chemical(s) shall sample water supplied from different sources until all the sources supplying that sampling point have been monitored.

(3) Monitoring frequency:

(a) Each community public water system and nontransient noncommunity public water system shall monitor with four consecutive quarterly samples at each sampling point for each organic chemical contaminant listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code during each compliance period.

(b) Public water systems serving more than three thousand three hundred persons which do not detect a contaminant listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code in their first compliance period may reduce the sampling frequency to a minimum of two quarterly samples in one year during each following compliance period.

(c) Public water systems serving fewer than three thousand three hundred one persons which do not detect a contaminant listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code in their first compliance period may reduce the sampling frequency to a minimum of one sample during each following compliance period.

(d) Public water systems that use a new source of water and new public water systems shall begin initial quarterly monitoring for each contaminant listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code in a quarter designated by the director during the next calendar year after operation of the new source or system begins. New public water systems shall sample at each sampling point. Public water systems with a new source of water shall sample at the sampling point related to the new source.

(4) The director may grant a waiver from one or more requirements of paragraphs (B)(3)(a) to (B)(3)(c) of this rule. Each waiver is valid for only one compliance period.

(5) The director may grant a waiver after evaluating the previous use (including transport, storage, or disposal) of a contaminant listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code within the watershed or zone of influence of the public water system. If a determination by the director reveals no previous use of the contaminant within the watershed or zone of influence, a waiver may be granted. If the contaminant has been used previously or if its previous use is unknown, then the following factors shall be used to determine whether a waiver is granted.

(a) Previous analytical results.

(b) The proximity of the public water system to a potential point or nonpoint source of contamination. Point sources include spills and leaks of chemicals at or near a water treatment facility or at manufacturing, distribution, or storage facilities or from hazardous and municipal waste landfills and other waste handling or treatment facilities. Nonpoint sources include the use of pesticides to control insect and weed pests on agricultural areas, forest lands, homes and gardens, and other land application uses.

(c) The environmental persistence and transport of the organic chemicals listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code.

(d) How completely the water source is protected against contamination due to such factors as the depth of the well, the type of soil, and the integrity of the well casing.

(e) Elevated nitrate levels at the public water system source.

(f) Use of polychlorinated biphenyls in equipment used in the production, storage, or distribution of water (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls used in pumps, transformers, etc.).

(6) If an organic chemical contaminant listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code is detected(as defined by paragraph (B)(14) of this rule) in any sample, then:

(a) Each public water system shall monitor quarterly at each sampling point which resulted in a detection. If a public water system is monitoring annually or less frequently for a previously detected contaminant, then the public water system does not have to return to quarterly monitoring unless the sample result exceeds eighty per cent of the MCL.

(b) The director may decrease the quarterly monitoring requirement specified in paragraph (B)(6)(a) of this rule to annual monitoring provided the director has determined that the public water system does not exceed eighty per cent of the MCL. In no case shall the director make this determination unless a groundwater system takes a minimum of two quarterly samples and a surface water system takes a minimum of four quarterly samples.

(c) Public water systems which monitor annually shall monitor during the quarter that previously yielded the highest analytical result.

(d) For public water systems which have three consecutive annual samples with no detection of a contaminant listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code, the director may grant a waiver as specified in paragraph (B)(4) of this rule.

(e) If monitoring results in detection of one or more of certain related contaminants (heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide), then subsequent monitoring shall analyze for all related contaminants.

(7) The director may require a confirmation sample for positive or negative results. If a confirmation sample is required by the director, the result shall be averaged with the first monitoring result and the average used for the compliance determination as specified by paragraph (B)(8) of this rule.

(8) Compliance with paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code shall be determined based on the analytical results obtained at each sampling point.

(a) For public water systems which are conducting monitoring at a frequency greater than annual, compliance is determined by a running annual average of all samples taken at each sampling point. The system will not be considered in violation of the MCL until it has completed one year of quarterly monitoring. If, however, the initial result or a subsequent result would cause the running annual average to exceed the MCL, then the public water system is out of compliance immediately. If a system fails to collect the required number of samples, compliance will be based on the total number of samples collected. If one sampling point is in violation of the MCL, the system is in violation of the MCL. Any results below the detection limit shall be calculated as zero for purposes of determining the running annual average.

(b) For public water systems monitoring annually or less frequently, when the average of a result and a confirmation sample exceeds eighty per cent of the MCL the public water system shall begin quarterly monitoring at that sample point. If a confirmation sample was not collected, the public water system shall begin quarterly monitoring if the level of the initial sample exceeds eighty percent of the MCL. Compliance with the MCL will then be determined by a running annual average as stated in paragraph (B)(8)(a) of this rule.

(9) Analysis for the organic chemical contaminants listed in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted by using methods set forth in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code.

(10) Analysis for polychlorinated biphenyls shall be conducted as follows:

(a) Each public water system which monitors for polychlorinated biphenyls shall analyze or have analyzed each sample using a technique set forth in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code.

(b) If polychlorinated biphenyls (as one of seven aroclors) are detected (as designated in this paragraph) in any sample analyzed using a technique set forth in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, the sample shall be reanalyzed using a technique set forth in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code to quantitate polychlorinated biphenyls(as decachlorobiphenyl).

(c) Compliance with the MCL for polychlorinated biphenyls shall be determined based upon the quantitative results of analyses using a technique set forth in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code.

Aroclor Detection limit (Milligrams per liter)

1016 0.00008

1221 0.02

1232 0.0005

1242 0.0003

1248 0.0001

1254 0.0001

1260 0.0002

(11) The director has discretion to delete results of obvious sampling or analytical errors.

(12) The director may increase the required monitoring frequency, where necessary, to detect variations within the public water system (e.g., fluctuations in concentration due to seasonal use, changes in water source).

(13) Each public water system shall monitor at the time designated by the director within each compliance period.

(14) Detection as used in this rule shall be defined as greater than or equal to the following concentration for each contaminant.

Contaminant Detection limit (Milligrams per liter)

Alachlor 0.0002

Atrazine 0.0001

Benzo(A)pyrene 0.00002

Carbofuran 0.0009

Chlordane 0.0002

Dalapon 0.001

1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) 0.00002

Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate 0.0006

Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 0.0006

Dinoseb 0.0002

Diquat 0.0004

2,4-d 0.0001

Endothall 0.009

Endrin 0.00001

Ethylene dibromide (EDB) 0.00001

Glyphosate 0.006

Heptachlor 0.00004

Heptachlor epoxide 0.00002

Hexachlorobenzene 0.0001

Hexachlorocyclopentadiene 0.0001

Lindane 0.00002

Methoxychlor 0.0001

Oxamyl 0.002

Pentachlorophenol 0.00004

Picloram 0.0001

Pentachlorophenol 0.00004

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (As decachlorobiphenyl) 0.0001

Simazine 0.00007

Toxaphene 0.001

2,3,7,8-TCDD (dioxin) 0.000000005

2,4,5-TP (silvex) 0.0002

(C) Monitoring for total trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids five (HAA5).

(1) Community public water systems and nontransient noncommunity public water systems that treat their water with any combination of primary or residual disinfectant, other than ultraviolet light, or delivers water that has been treated with any combination of primary or residual disinfectant, other than ultraviolet light, shall monitor for TTHM and HAA5 according to this rule. Beginning on the applicable compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule, community public water systems and nontransient noncommunity public water systems will no longer have to comply with paragraph (C) of this rule and shall comply with paragraph (D) of this rule.

(2) Each public water system required to monitor for TTHMs and HAA5 shall develop and implement a sample monitoring plan. The public water system shall maintain the plan and make it available for inspection by the director and the general public. All surface water systems serving more than three thousand three hundred people shall submit a copy of the monitoring plan to the director no later than the date of the first report required by paragraph (G) of rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code. The director may also require the plan to be submitted by any other public water system. The public water system shall modify the plan as required by the director. The plan must include at least the specific locations and schedules for collecting samples for TTHMs and HAA5. The director will determine compliance with MCLs for TTHMs and HAA5. If approved for monitoring as a consecutive public water system, or if providing water to a consecutive public water system, under the provisions of rule 3745-81-29 of the Administrative Code the sampling plan shall reflect the entire distribution system. Failure to monitor according to the monitoring plan is a monitoring violation.

(3) Public water systems shall take all samples during normal operating conditions.

(4) Routine monitoring for TTHMs and HAA5: public water systems specified in paragraph (C)(1) of this rule shall monitor at the frequency indicated in the following table:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-24_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(5) For each quarterly interval, all samples for each public water system shall be collected within a twenty-four hour period. This requirement may be waived in the event of any unforeseen, temporary or uncontrollable circumstances.

(6) If a public water system elects to sample more frequently than the minimum required, at least twenty-five per cent of all samples collected each quarter (including those taken in excess of the required frequency) must be taken at locations that represent the maximum residence time of the water in the distribution system. The remaining samples must be taken at locations representative of at least average residence time in the distribution system.

(7) Multiple wells drawing water from a single aquifer may be considered one treatment plant for determining the minimum number of samples required, with approval from the director. Public water systems may use the results of one sample to fulfill the monitoring requirements for more than one treatment plant, if this location is acceptable to the director.

(8) Public water systems may use data collected under the provisions of this rule to qualify for reduced monitoring. Public water systems may use another data set to qualify for reduced monitoring, provided it has been approved by the director.

(9) Reduced monitoring for TTHMs and HAA5: public water systems specified in paragraph (C) of this rule may reduce monitoring according to the following table:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-24_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(10) Public water systems on a reduced monitoring schedule may remain on that reduced schedule as long as the average of all samples taken in the year (for public water systems which must monitor quarterly) or the result of the sample (for public water systems which must monitor no more frequently than annually) is no more than 0.060 mg/l and 0.045 mg/l for TTHMs and HAA5, respectively. Public water systems that do not meet these levels shall resume monitoring at the frequency identified in paragraph (C)(4) of this rule (minimum monitoring frequency column) in the quarter immediately following the quarter in which the public water system exceeds either 0.060 mg/l and 0.045 mg/l for TTHM and HAA5, respectively. For systems using only ground water and serving fewer than ten thousand persons, if either the TTHM running annual average is > 0.080 mg/l or the HAA5 running annual average is > 0.060 mg/l, the system shall go to the increased monitoring identified in paragraph (C)(4) of this rule (sample location in the distribution system column) in the quarter immediately following the monitoring period in which the system exceeds 0.080 mg/l or 0.060 mg/l for TTHMs or HAA5 respectively.

(11) The director may return a public water system to routine monitoring at the director's discretion.

(12) All samples taken and analyzed under the provisions of this rule shall be included in determining compliance with the MCLs for TTHMs and HAA5, even if that number is greater than the minimum required.

(13) If, during the first year of monitoring under paragraph (C) of this rule, any individual quarter's average will cause the running annual average of that public water system to exceed the MCL, the public water system is out of compliance at the end of that quarter.

(14) For public water systems monitoring quarterly, compliance with MCLs for TTHMs and HAA5 shall be based on a running annual arithmetic average, computed quarterly, of quarterly arithmetic averages of all samples collected by the public water system as prescribed by paragraph (C) of this rule. If the running annual arithmetic average of quarterly averages covering any consecutive four-quarter period exceeds the MCL, the public water system is in violation of the MCL and must notify the public according to rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code, in addition to reporting to the director according to rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code. Failure to perform the required monitoring is a monitoring violation. The public water system will be in violation for the entire period covered by the running annual average. If a public water system fails to complete four consecutive quarters of monitoring, compliance with the MCL for the last four-quarter compliance period must be based on an average of the available data.

(15) For public water systems monitoring less frequently than quarterly, systems demonstrate MCL compliance if the average of samples taken that year according to paragraph (C) of this rule does not exceed the MCLs for TTHM and/or HAA5. If the average of these samples exceeds the MCL, the system must increase monitoring to once per quarter per treatment plant or bulk supplier. The system is not in violation of the MCL until it has completed one year of quarterly monitoring, unless the result of fewer than four quarters of monitoring will cause the running annual average to exceed the MCL, in which case the system is in violation at the end of that quarter. Systems required to increase their monitoring frequency to quarterly monitoring shall calculate compliance by including the sample which triggered the increased monitoring plus the following three quarters of monitoring.

(D) Monitoring for total trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids five (HAA5).

(1) Community public water systems and nontransient noncommunity public water systems that treat their water with any combination of primary or residual disinfectant, other than ultraviolet light, or delivers water that has been treated with any combination of primary or residual disinfectant, other than ultraviolet light, shall monitor for TTHM and HAA5 according to paragraph (D) of this rule. Public water systems which serve a population of fifty thousand or more persons shall comply beginning January 1, 2012. Public water systems which serve a population of fewer than fifty thousand persons shall comply beginning January 1, 2013. Public water systems which are part of a combined distribution system shall comply beginning at the same time as the system with the earliest compliance date in the combined distribution system. Public water systems are required to begin monitoring in the time period identified in the sample monitoring plan developed under paragraph (D)(9) of this rule. The director will determine compliance with MCLs for TTHMs and HAA5.

(2) For public water systems required to conduct quarterly monitoring, compliance with MCLs for TTHMs and HAA5 shall be based on a locational running annual arithmetic average at each monitoring location, calculated quarterly, at the end of the fourth calendar quarter following the compliance date and at the end of each subsequent quarter (or earlier if the LRAA calculated based on fewer than four quarters of data would cause the MCL to be exceeded regardless of the monitoring results of subsequent quarters). For public water systems monitoring quarterly, if the system fails to complete four consecutive quarters of monitoring, compliance with the MCL for the last four quarter compliance period must be based on the average of the available data from the most recent four quarters.

(3) If the public water system is required to conduct monitoring at a frequency that is less than quarterly, compliance with MCLs shall be based on the LRAA calculations beginning with the first compliance sample taken after the compliance date. If any sample result exceeds the MCL, the public water system must comply with the requirements of paragraphs (D)(18) to (D)(20) of this rule. If no sample exceeds the MCL, the sample result for each monitoring location is considered the LRAA for that monitoring location.

(4) If a public water system takes more than one sample per quarter at a monitoring location, the average of all samples taken in the quarter at that location must be used to determine a quarterly average to be used in the LRAA calculation.

(5) If the public water system fails to monitor according to the sample monitoring plan, the system will be in violation for the entire period covered by the locational running annual average. Public water systems shall take all samples during normal operating conditions.

(6) Routine monitoring for TTHMs and HAA5: Public water systems are required to begin monitoring at the locations and the time period identified in the sample monitoring plan developed under paragraph (D)(9) of this rule. Public water systems specified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule shall monitor at the frequency indicated and at no fewer than the number of locations identified in the following table:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-24_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(7) Systems on quarterly monitoring are required to monitor every ninety days. The ninety day monitoring frequency may be extended or reduced by five days to allow for unplanned circumstances that prevent monitoring precisely ninety days apart, as long as the samples are collected during each calendar quarter.

(8) If a system that does not disinfect begins using a disinfectant other than UV light after the dates in paragraph (A)(1) of rule 3745-81-22 of the Administrative Code, the system must consult with the director to identify compliance monitoring locations and develop a monitoring plan under paragraph (D)(9) of this rule that includes those monitoring locations.

(9) Each public water system required to monitor for TTHM and HAA5 shall develop and implement a sample monitoring plan. The public water system shall maintain the plan and make it available for inspection by the director and the general public. The monitoring plan must contain the following elements and be complete no later than three months prior to the year the public water system is required to begin monitoring under paragraph (D) of this rule: monitoring locations (including both a location address and sample monitoring point code); monitoring dates; and alternate monitoring locations (in the event access to a primary location is not available). The director will determine compliance with MCLs for TTHMs and HAA5.

(10) If public water systems were not required to submit an IDSE report under either paragraph (B) or (C) of rule 3745-81-22 of the Administrative Code, and do not have sufficient monitoring locations as found in paragraph (C) of this rule to identify the required number of compliance monitoring locations as specified in paragraph (D) of this rule as indicated in paragraph (F)(2) of rule 3745-81-22 of the Administrative Code, systems must identify additional locations in the sample monitoring plan. Additional monitoring locations must be chosen by alternating selection of locations representing high TTHM levels and high HAA5 levels until the required number of compliance monitoring locations have been identified. Public water systems must also provide the rationale for identifying the locations as having high levels of TTHM or HAA5. If a public water system has more monitoring locations than required for compliance monitoring according to paragraph (D) of this rule, systems must identify which locations will be used for compliance monitoring by alternating selection of locations representing high TTHM levels and high HAA5 levels until the required number of compliance monitoring locations have been identified.

(11) All surface water systems must submit a copy of the monitoring plan to the director by no later than three months prior to the year the public water system is required to begin monitoring under paragraph (D) of this rule. The director may require new community and non-transient non-community water systems that treat their water with any combination of primary or residual disinfectant, other than ultraviolet light, or deliver water that has been treated with any combination of primary or residual disinfectant, other than ultraviolet light and become active after the applicable compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule to develop and submit a sample monitoring plan within twelve months of becoming active.

(12) A public water system may revise the monitoring plan to reflect changes in treatment, distribution system operations and layout (including new service areas), or other factors that may affect TTHM or HAA5 formation, or for director approved reasons, after consultation with the director regarding the need for changes and the appropriateness of changes. If a system changes monitoring locations, the locations must replace existing compliance monitoring locations with the lowest LRAA with new locations that reflect the current distribution system locations with expected high TTHM or HAA5 levels. The director may also require modifications in the monitoring plan. Surface water systems must submit a copy of the modified monitoring plan to the director prior to the date required to comply with the revised monitoring plan.

(13) Reduced monitoring for TTHMs and HAA5: Public water systems may reduce monitoring to the level specified in the following table any time the LRAA is less than or equal to 0.040 mg/L for TTHM and less than or equal to 0.030 mg/L for HAA5 at all monitoring locations. Systems may only use data collected under the provisions of paragraph (C) or (D) of this rule to qualify for reduced monitoring. In addition, the source water annual average TOC level, before any treatment, must be less than or equal to 4.0 mg/L at each treatment plant treating surface water, based on monitoring conducted under rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code.

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-24_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(14) Public water systems may remain on reduced monitoring as long as the TTHM LRAA is less than or equal to 0.040 mg/L and the HAA5 LRAA is less than or equal to 0.030 mg/L at each monitoring location (for systems with quarterly reduced monitoring) or each TTHM sample is less than or equal to 0.060 mg/L and each HAA5 sample is less than or equal to 0.045 mg/L (for systems with annual or less frequent monitoring). In addition, the source water annual average TOC level, before any treatment, must be less than or equal to 4.0 mg/L at each treatment plant treating surface water, based on monitoring conducted under rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code.

(15) If the LRAA based on quarterly monitoring at any monitoring location exceeds either 0.040 mg/L for TTHM or 0.030 mg/L for HAA5 or if the annual (or less frequent) sample at any location exceeds either 0.060 mg/L for TTHM or 0.045 mg/L for HAA5, or if the source water annual average TOC level, before any treatment, greater than 4.0 mg/L at any treatment plant treating surface water, the system must resume routine monitoring under paragraph (D)(6) of this rule or begin increased monitoring if paragraph (D)(18) of this rule applies.

(16) The director may return a public water system to routine monitoring at the director's discretion, for reasons including but not limited to: treatment change, significant distribution changes, or disinfectant changes.

(17) Consecutive systems that do not add a disinfectant but deliver water that has been treated with a primary or residual disinfectant other than ultraviolet light, must comply with analytical, monitoring, and compliance requirements for chlorine and chloramines in rules 3745-81-27 and 3745-81-70 of the Administrative Code and report monitoring results under paragraph (G)(4) of rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code.

(18) If a public water system is required to monitor at a particular location annually or less frequently than annually under paragraph (D)(6) or (D)(13) of this rule, the system must increase monitoring to dual sample sets once per quarter (taken every ninety days) at all locations if a TTHM sample is greater than 0.080 mg/L or a HAA5 sample is greater than 0.060 mg/L at any location.

(19) A public water system is in violation of the MCL when the LRAA exceeds the MCLs in rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code, calculated based on four consecutive quarters of monitoring(or the LRAA calculated based on fewer than four quarters of data if the system fails to complete four consecutive quarters of monitoring, or if the MCL would be exceeded regardless of the monitoring results of subsequent quarters). The system is in violation of the monitoring requirements for each quarter that a monitoring result would be used in calculating an LRAA if the system fails to monitor.

(20) Public water systems may return to routine monitoring once increased monitoring has been conducted for at least four consecutive quarters and the LRAA for every monitoring location is less than or equal to 0.060 mg/L for TTHM and less than or equal to 0.045 mg/L for HAA5.

(21) Operational evaluation levels: A public water system has exceeded the operational evaluation level at any monitoring location where the sum of the two previous quarters' TTHM results plus twice the current quarter's TTHM result, divided by four to determine an average, exceeds 0.080 mg/L, or where the sum of the two previous quarters' HAA5 results plus twice the current quarter's HAA5 result, divided by four to determine an average, exceeds 0.060 mg/L.

(a) If a public water system exceeds the operational evaluation level, the system must conduct an operational evaluation and submit a written report of the evaluation to the director no later than ninety days after being notified by the director of the analytical result that causes the system to exceed the operational evaluation level. The written report must be made available to the public upon request.

(b) The public water system's operational evaluation must include an examination of system treatment and distribution operational practices, including storage tank operations, excess storage capacity, distribution system flushing, changes in sources or source water quality, and treatment changes or problems that may contribute to TTHM and HAA5 formation and what steps could be considered to minimize future exceedences.

(c) A public water system may request and the director may allow the system to limit the scope of the evaluation if the system is able to identify the cause of the operational evaluation level exceedance.

(d) A request from the system to limit the scope of the evaluation does not extend the schedule in paragraph (D)(21)(a) of this rule for submitting the written report. The director must approve this limited scope of evaluation in writing and the system must keep that approval with the completed report.

(22) Requirements for reduced TTHM and HAA5 monitoring based on results collected prior to the applicable compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule: A public water system may remain on reduced monitoring for compliance with paragraph (D) of this rule only if the system qualified for a 40/30 certification under paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-22 of the Administrative Code or received a very small system waiver under paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-22 of the Administrative Code, plus the system must meet the reduced monitoring criteria in paragraph (D)(13) of this rule, and the system does not change or add monitoring locations from those used for compliance monitoring prior to the compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule. If the monitoring locations under paragraph (D) of this rule differ from the monitoring locations prior to the compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule, the system may not remain on reduced monitoring.

(23) Requirements for remaining on increased TTHM and HAA5 monitoring based on results collected prior to the applicable compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule: If a public water system was on increased monitoring prior to the compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule, the system must remain on increased monitoring until it qualifies for a return to routine monitoring under paragraph (D)(20) of this rule. A public water system must conduct increased monitoring under paragraph (D) of this rule at the monitoring locations in the monitoring plan developed under paragraph (D)(9) of rule 3745-81-22 of the Administrative Code beginning on the compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule and remain on increased monitoring until the system qualifies for a return to routine monitoring under paragraph (D)(20) of this rule.

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/18/2009 and 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 08/24/81, 03/29/88, 05/22/89, 09/13/93, 01/01/02, 01/01/03, 08/01/05

3745-81-26 Radionuclide monitoring requirements.

Community public water systems shall monitor as described in this rule to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for radionuclides listed in rule 3745-81-15 of the Administrative Code. Analytical procedures which are acceptable for monitoring of radionuclide contaminants in drinking water are listed in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code. Community public water systems shall monitor for radionuclide contaminants according to a schedule provided by the director.

(A) Monitoring requirements for gross alpha particle activity, radium-226, radium-228, and uranium.

(1) For the purposes of monitoring for gross alpha particle activity, radium-226, radium-228, uranium, and beta particle and photon radioactivity in drinking water, "detection limit" is defined as in paragraph (D) of this rule.

(2) All existing community public water systems shall sample at every sampling point that is representative of all sources being used under normal operating conditions for that sampling point. The system shall take each sample at the same sampling point unless the director determines that conditions make another sampling location more representative of each source.

(3) All new community public water systems or community public water systems that use a new source of water shall begin initial monitoring within the first quarter after initiating use of the source.

(4) Initial monitoring. Systems shall conduct initial monitoring for gross alpha particle activity, radium-226, radium-228, and uranium as follows:

(a) Systems shall collect four consecutive quarterly samples at all sampling points .

(b) For gross alpha particle activity, uranium, radium-226, and radium-228 monitoring, the director may waive the final two quarters of initial monitoring for a sampling point if the results of the samples from the previous two quarters are below the detection limit.

(5) If the average of the initial monitoring results for a sampling point is above the maximum contaminant level (MCL), the community public water system shall collect and analyze quarterly samples at that sampling point until the system has results from four consecutive quarters that are at or below the MCL.

(6) Reduced monitoring. The director may allow community public water systems to reduce the future frequency of monitoring from once every three years to once every six or nine years at each sampling point, based on the following criteria:

(a) If the average of the initial monitoring results for each contaminant (i.e., gross alpha particle activity, uranium, radium-226, or radium-228) is below the detection limit specified in paragraph (D) of this rule, the community public system shall collect and analyze for that contaminant using at least one sample at that sampling point every nine years.

(b) For gross alpha particle activity and uranium, if the average of the initial monitoring results for each contaminant is at or above the detection limit but at or below fifty per cent of the MCL, the community public water system shall collect and analyze for that contaminant using at least one sample at that sampling point every six years.

For combined radium-226 and radium-228, the analytical results shall be combined. If the average of the combined initial monitoring results for radium-226 and radium-228 is at or above the detection limit but at or below fifty per cent of the MCL, the community public water system shall collect and analyze for the contaminant(s) using at least one sample at that sample point every six years.

(c) For gross alpha particle activity and uranium, if the average of the initial monitoring results for each contaminant is above fifty per cent of the MCL but at or below the MCL, the community public water system shall collect and analyze at least one sample at that sampling point every three years.

For combined radium-226 and radium-228, the analytical results shall be combined. If the average of the combined initial monitoring results for radium-226 and radium-228 is above fifty per cent of the MCL but at or below the MCL, the community public water system shall collect and analyze at least one sample at that sampling point every three years.

(d) Community public water systems shall use the samples collected during the reduced monitoring period to determine the monitoring frequency for subsequent monitoring periods (e.g., if a system's sampling point is on a nine year monitoring period, and the sample result is above fifty per cent of MCL but at or below the MCL, then the next monitoring period for that sampling point is at least one sample every three years.)

(e) Ifa community public water system has a monitoring result that exceeds the MCL while on reduced monitoring, the system shall collect and analyze quarterly samples at that sampling point until the system has results from four consecutive quarters that are at or below the MCL.

(7) A gross alpha particle activity measurement may be substituted for the required radium-226 measurement provided that the measured gross alpha particle activity does not exceed five pCi/L. A gross alpha particle activity measurement may be substituted for the required uranium measurement provided that the measured gross alpha particle activity does not exceed fifteen pCi/L. The gross alpha measurement shall have a confidence interval of ninety-five per cent ( 1.96 sigma where sigma is the standard deviation ofthe net counting rate ofthe sample) for radium-226 and uranium. When a community public water system uses a gross alpha particle activity measurement in lieu of radium-226 and/or uranium measurement, the gross alpha particle activity analytical result will be used to determine the future monitoring frequency for radium-226 and/or uranium. If the gross alpha particle activity result is less than detection, fifty per cent of the detection limit will be used to determine compliance and the future monitoring frequency.

(B) Monitoring requirements for beta particle and photon radioactivity.

(1) The director may designate a community public water system as vulnerable to beta particle and photon radioactivity contamination based on identified potential radioactive sources within the drinking water source protection area delineated or endorsed by the agency under Ohio's wellhead protection and source water assessment and protection programs. Community public water systems designated by the director as vulnerable shall sample for beta particle and photon radioactivity to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant levels listed in rule 3745-81-15asfollows:

(a) Community public water systems shall collect quarterly samples for beta emitters and annual samples for tritium and strotium-90 at each sampling point, beginning within one quarter after being notified by the director. Systems designated as vulnerable shall continue to sample until the director removes the designation.

(b) If the gross beta particle activity at a sampling point has a running annual average (computed quarterly) less than or equal to fifty pCi/L (screening level) and the combined monitoring results for all measured contaminants (i.e. tritium. strontium-90, and any other contaminants for beta particle and photon radioactivity as specified by rule 3745-81-15 of the Administrative Code) are at or below the MCL, the director may reduce the frequency of monitoring at that sampling point to once every three years. Systems shall collect all samples required in paragraph (B)(1)(a) of this rule during the reduced monitoring period.

(2) Community public water systems designated by the director as utilizing waters contaminated by effluents from nuclear facilities shall sample for beta particle and photon radioactivity to determine compliance with the MCLs listed in rule 3745-81-15 of the Administrative Code as follows:

(a) Community public water systems shall collect monthly samples for gross beta particle activity and quarterly samples for iodine-131, tritium, and strontium-90 at each sampling point, beginning within one quarter after being notified in writing by the director. For iodine-131, five consecutive daily samples shall be analyzed once each quarter. As ordered by the director, more frequent monitoring shall be conducted when iodine-131 is identified in the finished water. Systems designated by the director as using waters contaminated by effluents from nuclear facilities shall continue to sample until the director removes the designation.

(b) If the gross beta particle activity at a sampling point has a running average (computed quarterly) less than or equal to fifteen pCi/L (screening level) and the combined monitoring results are at or below the MCL for all measured contaminants (i.e., iodine-131, tritium, strontium-90, etc.), the director may reduce the frequency of monitoring at that sampling point to every three years. Community public water systems shall collect all samples required in paragraph (B)(2)(a) of this rule during the reduced monitoring period.

(3) A waiver from the monitoring frequencies specified in paragraph (B)(1) or (B)(2) of this rule shall not be granted to community public water systems designated by the director as vulnerable to beta particle and photon radioactivity contamination.

(4) Community public water systems may analyze for naturally occurring potassium-40 beta particle activity from the same or equivalent sample used for gross beta particle activity analysis. Systems may subtract the potassium-40 beta particle activity value from the total gross beta activity. The potassium-40 beta particle activity shall be calculated by multiplying elemental potassium concentrations (in mg/L) by a factor of 0.82 picocuries ofpotassium-40 per milligram ofpotassium.

(5) Ifthe gross beta particle activity (minus the naturally occurring potassium-40 beta particle activity) exceeds the appropriate screening level, an analysis of the sample shall be performed to identify the major applicable radioactive constituents present in the sample and the appropriate doses shall be calculated and summed to determine compliance with the MCLs listed in rule 3745-81-15 of the Administrative Code. Doses shall also be calculated and combined for measured levels of tritium and strontium to determine compliance.

(6) Community public water systems shall monitor monthly at the sampling point(s) which exceed the MCLs as determined in rule 3745-81-15 of the Administrative Code beginning the month after the exceedance occurs. Systems shall continue monthly monitoring until the system has established, by a running average of three monthly samples, that the MCL is being met. Systems who establish that the MCL is being met shall return to quarterly monitoring until they meet the requirements set forth in paragraph (B)(1)(b) or (B)(2)(b) ofthis rule.

(7) For community public water systems in the vicinity ofa nuclear facility or other facility that is a radioactive source, the director may allow the systems to utilize environmental surveillance data collected by the nuclear facility (i.e., raw water data for locations within the vicinity of the systems) in lieu of monitoring at the system's sampling point(s), where the director determines that data is applicable to a particular water system. In the event that there is a release from a nuclear facility, community public water systems which are using surveillance data shall begin monitoring at the system's sampling point(s) in accordance with paragraph (B)(1) or (B)(2) ofthis rule.

(C) General monitoring and compliance requirements for radionuclides.

(1) The director may require more frequent monitoring than specified in paragraphs (A) and (B) ofthis rule, or may require confirmation samples. The results of the initial and confirmation samples will be averaged for use in compliance determinations.

(2) To determine compliance with the MCLs listed in rule 3745-81-15 of the Administrative Code, averages ofdata shall be used and shall be rounded to the same number ofsignificant figures as the maximum contaminant level for the substance in question.

(3) Compliance with the MCLs listed in rule 3745-81-15 of the Administrative Code will be determined based on the analytical result(s) obtained at each sampling point. If the average of any sampling point is greater than the MCL, then the community public water system is in violation of the MCL.

(a) For community public water systems monitoring more than once per year, compliance with the MCL is determined quarterly by a running annual average at each sampling point. If the average of any sampling point is greater than the MCL, then the system is in violation of the MCL.

(b) For community public water systems monitoring more than once per year, if any sample result will cause the running annual average to exceed to MCL at any sampling point, the system is out of compliance with the MCL immediately.

(c) Community public water systems shall include all samples taken and analyzed under the provisions of this rule in determining compliance, even if that number is greater than the minimum required.

(d) If a community public water system does not collect all required samples when compliance is based on a running annual average, compliance will be based on the running average of the total number of samples collected.

(e) If a sample result is less than the detection limit, zero will be used to calculate the running annual average, unless a gross alpha particle activity result is being used in lieu of radium-226 or uranium. If the gross alpha particle activity result is less than detection, fifty per cent of the detection limit will be used to calculate the running annual average for radium-226 and/or uranium.

(4) The director has the discretion to delete results of obvious sampling or analytical errors.

(5) If a MCL set forth in rule 3745-81-15 of the Administrative Code is exceeded, the owner or operator of a community water system shall give notice to the director pursuant to rule 3745-81-31 of the Administrative Code and to the public as required by rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code.

(D) For the purpose of monitoring radioactivity concentrations in drinking water, the required sensitivity ofthe radioanalysis is defined in terms ofa detection limit.

(1) The detection limit shall be that concentration which can be counted with a precision of plus or minus one hundred per cent at the ninety-five per cent confidence level ( 1.96 sigma where sigma is the standard deviation of the net counting rate ofthe sample).

(2) To determine compliance with rule 3745-81-15 of the Administrative Code, the detection limits shall not exceed the concentrations listed in the following table:

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-26_ph_ff_a_ru_20100210_1119-1.png

Effective: 02/22/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 11/24/2009 and 02/22/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 05/22/89, 09/15/04, 04/15/05

3745-81-27 Analytical techniques.

(A) Inorganic chemical analyses conducted to determine compliance with rules 3745-81-11 , 3745-81-23 , 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-86 , 3745-81-88 , and 3745-83-01 of the Administrative Code shall be performed by a laboratory certified by the director pursuant to Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code unless otherwise specified and shall be made in accordance with methods listed in this rule for the chemicals being analyzed. Inorganic chemical analyses required by rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code also shall be made in accordance with methods listed in this rule for the chemicals being analyzed but do not require that the laboratory be certified pursuant to Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code. Many of these inorganic chemical analysis methods are described in books and manuals referred to in this paragraph as"Standard Methods," "Standard Methods Online," "Technical Notes," EMSL94, and EMSL93. The United States environmental protection agency (or USEPA) books and manuals are available from the "National Technical Information Service (or NTIS), United States Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161," with telephone number 800-553-6847. USEPA books and manuals are also available from the "National Service Center for Environmental Publications (or NSCEP), P.O. Box 42419, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242-0419," or http://www.epa.gov/nscep.

"Standard Methods" stands for the nineteenth, twentieth or twenty-first editions of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, by the American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, and Water Pollution Control Federation, 1992, 1995, 1998 and 2006 respectively." "Standard Methods Online" stands for online versions of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater." These methods can be found at www.standardmethods.org. The year in which each method was approved by the standard methods committee is designated by the last two digits in the method number. Frequently quoted methods of analysis for metals include method 3111 (atomic absorption spectrometry-direct aspiration flame), method 3113 (electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry), method 3120 (inductively coupled plasma-emission spectroscopy), and method 4110 B (anion chromatography).

"Technical Notes" stands for "Technical Notes on Drinking Water Methods," dated October 1994 and designated EPA/600/R-94/173, by the " United States Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45268," available from NTIS as PB95-104766. "Technical Notes" contains mandatory and recommended modifications for some analytical methods included in this paragraph; criteria for analyzing arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, calcium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, selenium, sodium, and thallium with digestion or directly without digestion; and additional information pertinent to analysis of contaminants in drinking water.

"EMSL94" stands for "Methods for the Determination of Metals in Environmental Samples - Supplement I," dated May 1994 and designated EPA-600/R-94/111, by the "United States Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Cincinnati," available to government agencies from "ORD Publications, 26 West MLK Drive, Cincinnati Ohio 45268-1072," with telephone number 513-569-7562, and generally available from the NTIS with designation PB94-18942. Frequently quoted methods of analyses for metals include method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry), method 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry), and method 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) (stabilized temperature graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry).

"EMSL93" stands for "Methods for the Determination of Inorganic Substances in Environmental Samples," dated August 1993 and designated EPA/600/R-93/100, by the "United States Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Cincinnati, Ohio 45268," available from NTIS as PB94-120821. Method 300.0 (inorganic anion determination by ion chromatography) is frequently quoted.

"EPA method 335.4 " stands for "USEPA Method 335.4, Determination of Total Cyanide by Semi-Automated Colorimetry, Revision 1.0," dated August 1993 and designated EPA/600/R-93/100, available from NTIS as PB94-120821.

"Methods for the Determination of Inorganic Substances in Environmental Samples," dated August 1993, designated EPA/600/R-93/100 and available from NTIS as PB94-120821. This manual includes methods 353.2 and 335.4.

"EPA method 200.5 " stands for "USEPA Method 200.5, Determination of Trace Elements in Drinking Water by Axially Viewed Inductively Coupled Plasma -Atomic Emission Spectrometry (AVICP-AES), Revision 4.2," dated October 2003 and designated EPA/600/R-06/115, available from USEPA's, "National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL)."

Methods which have been determined to be equivalent to an approved method, by "USEPA Alternative Test Procedure (ATP) program at the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water's Technical Support Center (OGWDW/TSC)," may be used for compliance monitoring. Equivalent methods will be referenced as the method is listed in rule 3745-81-27withnospecialnotation. The letter of equivalence issued by USEPA's ATP program at OGWDW/TSC must be maintained by the certified laboratory and be available for verification.

(1) Aluminum: "Standard Methods" section 3111 D (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 D-99 or 3113 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(2) Antimony: "Standard Methods" section 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3113 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(3) Arsenic: "Standard Methods" section 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) (atomic absorption furnace) or 3114 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) (hydride atomic absorption) as modified in "Technical Notes" or "Standard Methods Online" section 3113 B-99 or 3114 B-97 or EMSL94 method 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(4) Asbestos: "Technical Notes" method 100.1 and "Analytical Method for Determination of Asbestos Fibers in Water," EPA-600/4-83-043, September 1983, "United States Environmental Research Laboratory, Athens, Georgia 30613," available from NTIS as PB83-260471, or method 100.2, "Determination of Asbestos Structures Over 10 µM in Length in Drinking Water," EPA/600/R-94/134, June 1994, available from NTIS as PB94-201902.

(5) Barium: "Standard Methods" section 3111 D (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 D-99 or 3113 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(6) Beryllium: "Standard Methods" section 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3113 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(7) Bromate: EPA method 300.1 Rev. 1.0 or 317.0 Rev. 2.0 or 302.0 or326.0 Rev. 1.0 or 321.8or 557. EPA methods 300.1 Rev. 1.0 and 321.8 are in "Methods for the Determination of Organic and Inorganic Compounds in Drinking Water, Volume 1, USEPA, August 2000, EPA 815-R-00-014" (available through NTIS, PB2000-106981). EPA Method 317.0 Rev 2.0, "Determination of Inorganic Oxyhalide Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water Using Ion Chromatography with the Addition of a Postcolumn Reagent for Tracer Bromate Analysis," USEPA, July 2001, EPA 815-B-01-001, EPA Method 326.0 Rev 1.0, "Determination of Inorganic Oxyhalide Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water Using Ion Chromatography Incorporating the Addition of a Suppressor Acidified Postcolumn Reagent for Trace Bromate Analysis," USEPA, June 2002, EPA 815-R-03-007. EPA method 302.0, "Determination of Bromate in Drinking Waters using Two-Dimensional Ion Chromatography with Suppressed Conductivity Detection," September 2009 (EPA 815-B-09-014) and EPA method 557, "Determination of Haloacetic Acids, Bromate and Dalapon in Drinking Water by Ion Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry," August 2009 (EPA 815-B-09-012) may be used for the routine determination of bromate in drinking water and for reduced bromate monitoring. Copies of EPA method 302.0 and EPA method 557 can be accessed and downloaded on-line at http://epa.gov/safewater/methods/analyticalmethods_ogwdw.html. EPA methods 317.0 Rev 2.0, or 326.0 or 321.8 must be used for monitoring of bromate for purposes of demonstrating eligibility of reduced monitoring, as prescribed in paragraph (L)(6) of rule 3745-81-23 of the Administrative Code. EPA method 321.8 samples must be preserved at the time of sampling with fifty milligrams of ethylenediamine(EDA)/L of sample and must be analyzed within twenty-eight days. EPA method 317.0 Rev. 2.0, 326.0 Rev. 1.0 or 321.8 shall be used to qualify for reduced monitoring according to paragraph (L)(5) of rule 3745-81-23 of the Administrative Code, and laboratories using these methods must be able to meet minimum reporting limits as listed in Appendix B to rule 3745-89-03 of the Administrative Code.

(8) Bromide: EMSL93 method 300.0 Rev. 2.1 or EPA method 300.1 Rev. 1.0 or EPA method 317.0 Rev 2.0 or EPA method 326.0 Rev. 1.0. "EPA method 300.1 " stands for "USEPA Method 300.1, Determination of Inorganic Anions in Drinking Water by Ion Chromatography, Revision 1.0," dated 1997 and designated EPA/600/R-98/118, available from NTIS as PB98-169196.

(9) Cadmium: "Standard Methods" section 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3113 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(10) Calcium: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 3500 Ca D (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth) (EDTA titrimetric method) or 3500 Ca B (21st) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or 3500 Ca D-97 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(11) Chloride: "Standard Methods" section 4500-Cl- B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first)(argentometric) or 4110 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500-Cl- D (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (potentiometric) or "Standard Methods Online" 4500-ClB-97 or 4110 B-00 or 4500 ClD-97 or EPA method 300.0 Rev. 2.1 or 300.1 Rev. 1.0.

(12) Chlorite: "Standard Methods" section 4500-ClO2 E (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 4500-ClO 2 E-00 or EPA method 327.0 Rev. 1.1, "Determination of Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorite Ion in Drinking Water Using Lissamine Green B and Horseradish Peroxidase with Detection by Visible Spectrophotometry," USEPA, May 2005, EPA 815-R-05-008 may be used for routine daily monitoring of chlorite at the entrance of the distribution system. This analysis shall be performed by persons acceptable to the director. EPA method 300.0 Rev. 2.1 or 300.1 Rev. 1.0 or 317.0 Rev. 2.0 or 326.0 Rev. 1.0 shall be used for routine monthly monitoring of chlorite and additional monitoring of chlorite in the distribution system. This analysis shall be performed by a laboratory certified by the director according to Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code.

(13) Chromium: "Standard Methods" section 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) as modified in "Technical Notes" or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3113 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(14) Copper: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 B-99 or 3113 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994). In addition, untreated raw water may be analyzed by "Standard Methods" section 3500-Cu E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth) or "Standard Methods Online" 3500-Cu E-99) (bathocuproine) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(15) Cyanide: manual distillation by "Standard Methods" section 4500-CN- C (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) followed by "Standard Methods" section 4500-CN- E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (colorimetric) or 4500-CN- F (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first)(selective electrode) or 4500-CN- G (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (amenable to chlorination) or "Standard Methods Online" section 4500-CN- E-99 or 4500-CN- F-99 or 4500-CN- G-99 or EPA method 335.4 Rev. 1.0 or Lachat QuikChem 10-204-00-1-X or Kelada 01 Rev. 1.2 or OIA-1677, DW. Some mandatory method modifications are given in "Technical Notes."

(16) Fluoride: "Standard Methods" section 4110 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500-F- C (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (ion-selective electrode) or 4500-F- E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first)(automated Alizarin), or "Standard Methods Online" section 4110 B-00 or 4500-F- C-97 or 4500-F- E-97 or EPA method 300.0 Rev. 2.1 or 300.1 Rev. 1.0, or "Technicon Industrial Systems" method 380-75WE (February 1976) or 129-71W (December 1972), available from "Technicon Industrial Systems, Tarrytown NY 10591."

(17) Iron: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 3500-Fe D (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth) (phenanthroline) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 B-99 or 3113 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or 3500-Fe D-97 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(18) Lead: "Standard Methods" section 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3113 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(19) Manganese: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 3500-Mn D (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth) (persulfate) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 B-99 or 3113 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or 3500-Mn D-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(20) Magnesium: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 3500-Mg E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or 3500-Mg E-97 or EMSL 94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(21) Mercury: "Standard Methods" section 3112 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) (cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3112 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 245.1 Rev. 3.0 (manual cold vapor technique) or EMSL93 method 245.2 (automated cold vapor technique).

(22) Nickel: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 B-99 or 3113 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(23) Nitrate: "Standard Methods" section 4110 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth) (ion chromatography) or 4500-NO 3- D (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth) (nitrate electrode) or 4500-NO 3- E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth) (cadmium reduction) or 4500-NO 3- F (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth) (automated cadmium reduction), or "Standard Methods Online" section 4110 B-00 or 4500-NO 3- D-00 or 4500-NO 3- E-00 or 4500-NO 3- F-00, or EPA Method 300.0 Rev. 2.1 or 300.1 Rev. 1.0 or 353.2 Rev. 2.0 (cadmium reduction automated colorimetric), or method B-1011, "Waters Test Method for Determination of Nitrite/Nitrate in Water Using Single Column Ion Chromatography, August 1987." Copies may be obtained from Waters Corporation, Technical Services Division, 34 Maple Street, Millford, MA 01757-3696, 800-252-4752, or D6508 Rev. 2.0, "Waters Test Method for Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Anions in Aqueous Matrices Using Capillary Ion Electrophoresis and Chromate Electrolyte''." Copies may be obtained from Waters Corp, 34 Maple St., Milford, MA, 01757-3696, 800-252-4752. "Systea Easy (1-Reagent) Nitrate Method" can be downloaded from the "National Environmental Methods Index (NEMI)" at http://www.nemi.gov, or obtained from "Systea Scientific, LLC, 900 Jorie Blvd., Suite 35, Oaks Brook, IL 60523, or by telephone at 630-645-0600."

(24) Nitrite: "Standard Methods" section 4110 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (ion chromatography) or 4500-NO 2-B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (colorimetric) or 4500-NO 3-E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (cadmium reduction) or 4500-NO 3-F (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (automated cadmium reduction), or "Standard Methods Online" section 4110 B-00 or 4500-NO2- B-00 or 4500-NO 3- E-00 or 4500-NO 3- F-00, or EPA method 300.0 Rev. 2.1 or 300.1 Rev. 1.0 or 353.2 Rev. 2.0 (cadmium reduction automated colorimetric), or method B-1011, "Waters Test Method for Determination of Nitrite/Nitrate in Water Using Single Column Ion Chromatography, August 1987.". Copies may be obtained from "Waters Corporation, Technical Services Division, 34 Maple Street, Millford, MA 01757-3696, 800-252-4752, or D6508 Rev. 2.0," "Waters Test Method for Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Anions in Aqueous Matrices Using Capillary Ion Electrophoresis and Chromate Electrolyte.'' Copies may be obtained from "Waters Corp, 34 Maple St., Milford, MA, 01757-3696, 800-252-4752." "Systea Easy (1-Reagent) Nitrate Method, February 4, 2009" can be downloaded from the "National Environmental Methods Index (NEMI)" at http://www.nemi.gov, or obtained from "Systea Scientific, LLC, 900 Jorie Blvd., Suite 35, Oaks Brook, IL 60523, or by telephone at 630-645-0600." 3745-81-27 7

(25) Orthophosphate: "Standard Methods" section 4110 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500-P E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (ascorbic acid) or 4500-P F (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first)(automated ascorbic acid reduction), or "Standard Methods Online" section 4110 B-00 or 4500-P E-99 or 4500 P F-99 or EPA method 300.0 Rev. 2.1 or 300.1 Rev. 1.0 or method D6508 Rev. 2.0, "Waters Test Method for Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Anions in Aqueous Matrices Using Capillary Ion Electrophoresis and Chromate Electrolyte''. Copies may be obtained from Waters Corp, 34 Maple St., Milford, MA, 01757-3696, 800-252-4752."

(26) Selenium: "Standard Methods" section 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3114 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) (hydride generation/atomic absorption spectrometric) as modified in "Technical Notes" or "Standard Methods Online" 3113 B-97 or 3114 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(27) Silica: "Standard Methods" section 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500-Si D (eighteenth, nineteenth) (molybdosilicate) or 4500-Si E (eighteenth, nineteenth) (heterpoly blue) or 4500-Si F (eighteenth, nineteenth) (automated for molybdate-reactive silica) or 4500 SiO 2 -C (twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500 SiO 2 -D (twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500 SiO 2 -E (twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3120 B-99 or 4500 SiO 2 C-97 or 4500 SiO 2 D-97 or 4500 SiO 2 E-97 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(28) Silver: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3113 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 B-99, 3113 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(29) Sodium: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (twenty-first) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(30) Sulfate: "Standard Methods" section 4110 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500-SO 42- C and D (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500-SO 42- F (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500-SO 42- E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 4110 B-00 or 4500 SO 4 C-97 or 4500 SO 4 D-97 or 4500 SO 4 F-97 or 4500 SO 4 E-97 or EPA method 300.0 Rev. 2.1 or 300.1 Rev. 1.0, or 375.2 (automated colorimetry) or method D6508 Rev. 2.0, "Waters Test Method for Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Anions in Aqueous Matrices Using Capillary Ion Electrophoresis and Chromate Electrolyte." Copies may be obtained from "Waters Corp, 34 Maple St., Milford, MA, 01757-3696, 800-252-4752."

(31) Thallium: EMSL94 method 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or 200.9 Rev. 2.2(1994).

(32) Total Phosphorous: "Standard Methods" section 4500-P B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) with 4500-P E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 4500-P F (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 4500 P E-99 or 4500 P F-99.

(33) Zinc: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or EMSL94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or 200.8 Rev. 5.4(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(B) Organic chemical sampling and analyses, as required by rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, shall use the following procedures. Analyses shall be performed by a laboratory certified by the director pursuant to Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code. Procedures for many of these specified organic chemical analyses are included in manuals prepared by the"Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Cincinnati of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)." These manuals may be purchased from the "National Technical Information Service (NTIS), U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161," with telephone number 800-553-6847. They are also available to government agencies from "ORD Publications, 26 West MLK Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 45268-1072," with telephone number 513-569-7562. USEPA books and manuals are also available from the "National Service Center for Environmental Publications (or NSCEP), P.O. Box 42419, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242-0419," or http://www.epa.gov/nscep.

Methods which have been determined to be equivalent to an approved method, by USEPA Alternative Test Procedure (ATP) program at the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water's Technical Support Center (OGWDW/TSC), may be used for compliance monitoring. Equivalent methods will be referenced as the method is listed in this rule with no special notation. The letter of equivalence issued by USEPA's ATP program at OGWDW/TSC must be maintained by the certified laboratory and be available for verification.

One manual is "Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water, dated December 1988 (Revised July 1991), designated EPA/600/4-88/039R and available from NTIS as PB91-231480." This manual includes currently approved USEPA analysis methods 505, 507, 508, 508A, 515.1, and 531.1.

Another manual is "Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water-Supplement I, dated July 1990, designated EPA/600/4-90/020," and available from NTIS as PB91-146027. This manual includes currently approved USEPA analysis methods 547, 550, and 550.1.

A third manual is named "Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water-Supplement II," dated August 1992, designated EPA/600/R-92/129, available from NTIS as PB92-207703, and containing methods 515.2, 548.1, 549.1, 552.1 Rev. 1.0, and 555.

A fourth manual is named "Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water-Supplement III," dated August 1995, designated EPA/600/R-95/131, available from NTIS as PB95-261616, and containing methods 502.2 Rev. 2.1, 504.1, 508.1, 524.2, 525.2, 551.1 Rev. 1.0, and 552.2 Rev. 1.0.

A fifth manual is named "Methods for the Determination of Organic and Inorganic Compounds in Drinking Water," dated August 2000, designated EPA 815-R-00-014, available from the "National Service Center for Environmental Publications (NSCEP)," P.O. Box 42419, Cincinnati, OH 45242-2419, telephone number 800-490-9198. This manual includes currently approved USEPA methods 515.3 and 549.2.

"Technical Notes" stands for "Technical Notes on Drinking Water Methods", dated October 1994 and designated "EPA/600/R-94/173, by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45268," available from NTIS as PB95-104766. "Technical Notes" contains mandatory and recommended modifications for some of the analytical methods referred to in this paragraph and also includes additional information pertinent to analysis of contaminants in drinking water.

USEPA method 1613, "Tetra- through Octa-Chlorinated Dioxins and Furans by Isotope-Dilution HRGC/HRMS," designated EPA-821-B-94-005 and dated October 1994, available from NTIS as PB95-104774. Copies may be obtained from NTIS, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161, Phone: 703-605-6000 or 800-553-6847.

USEPA method 524.3 Version 1.0, "Measurement of Purgeable Organic Compounds in Water by Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry," designated EPA 815-B-09-009 and dated June 2009, available at http://epa.gov/safewater/methods/analyticalmethods_ogwdw.html.

Other sources of methods are the eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first editions of "Standard Methods For the Examination of Water and Wastewater; by American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, and Water Environment Federation"; dated 1992, 1995, 1998 and 2006 respectively; designated "Standard Methods"; and containing method 6651 which is pertinent to this paragraph. The eighteenth edition supplement was copyrighted in 1994 and contains method 6610 which is pertinent to this paragraph. Also, "Standard Methods Online" stands for online versions of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater." These methods can be found at www.standardmethods.org. The year in which each method was approved by the standard methods committee is designated by the last two digits in the method number.

(1) Sampling and analyses for total trihalomethanes made to determine compliance with rules 3745-81-12 and 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted by a method listed in paragraphs (B)(1)(a) to (B)(1)(c) of this rule. Samples for total trihalomethanes shall be dechlorinated upon collection to prevent further production of trihalomethanes, according to the procedures described in the following methods.

(a) USEPA method 502.2 Rev. 2.1, "Volatile Organic Compounds in Water by Purge and Trap Capillary Gas Chromatography with Photoionization and Electrolytic Conductivity Detector in Series." A photoionization detector (PID) is not required if total trihalomethanes are the only analytes measured in the sample.

(b) USEPA method 524.2 Rev. 4.1 or 524.3 Version 1.0, "Measurement of Purgeable Organic Compounds in Water by Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry."

(c) USEPA method 551.1 Rev. 1.0, "Determination of Chlorination Disinfection Byproducts, Chlorinated Solvents and Halogenated Pesticides/Herbicides in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Gas Chromatography with Electron-Capture Detection."

(2) Sampling and analysis for haloacetic acids (five) made to determine compliance with rules 3745-81-12 and 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted by a method listed in paragraphs (B)(2)(a) to (B)(2)(e) of this rule.

(a) USEPA method 552.1 Rev. 1.0, "Determination of Haloacetic Acids and Dalapon in Drinking Water by Ion Exchange Liquid-Solid Extraction and Gas Chromatography with Electron Capture Detection." The samples must be extracted within fourteen days of sample collection.

(b) USEPA method 552.2 Rev. 1.0, "Determination of Haloacetic Acids and Dalapon in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Extraction, Derivatization and Gas Chromatography with Electron Capture Detection."

(c) USEPA method 552.3, Rev 1.0 "Determination of Haloacetic Acids and Dalapon in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Microextraction, Derivatization, and Gas Chromatography with Electron Capture Detection" USEPA, July 2003, EPA-815-B-03-002.

(d) USEPA method 557, "Determination of Haloacetic Acids, Bromate and Dalapon in Drinking Water by Ion Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (USEPA 2009e)," may be used for determining HAA5 in drinking water. A copy of this method can be accessed and downloaded on-line athttp://epa.gov/safewater/methods/analyticalmethods_ogwdw.html.

(e) "Standard Methods," 6251 B (nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first). The samples must be extracted within fourteen days of sample collection.

(f) "Standard Methods Online," 6251 B-94.

(3) Organic chemical analyses required by rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted using the following United States environmental protection agency methods or their equivalent as approved by the United States environmental protection agency and the director. The methods listed in paragraphs (B)(3)(a) to (B)(3)(d) of this rule are contained in one of the manuals listed in paragraph (B) of this rule.

(a) USEPA method 502.2 Rev. 2.1, "Volatile Organic Compounds in Water by Purge and Trap Capillary Gas Chromatography with Photoionization and Electrolytic Conductivity Detector in Series," as modified in "Technical Notes," may be used for analyzing for all the compounds referred to in paragraph (B)(3) of this rule.

(b) USEPA method 524.2 Rev. 4.1, "Measurement of Purgeable Organic Compounds in Water by Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry," as modified in "Technical Notes" or USEPA method 524.3 Version 1.0, may be used for analyzing for all the compounds referred to in paragraph (B)(3) of this rule.

(c) USEPA method 504.1, "1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB), 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP), and 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (123TCP) in Water By Microextraction and Gas Chromatography,"may be used for analyzing 1,2,3-trichloropropane.

(d) USEPA method 551.1 Rev. 1.0, "Determination of Chlorination Disinfection Byproducts, Chlorinated Solvents and Halogenated Pesticides/Herbicides in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Gas Chromatography with Electron-Capture Detection," may be used for analyzing bromodichloromethane, bromoform, carbon tetrachloride, chlorodibromomethane, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene.

(4) Organic chemical analyses required in rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted using the following approved methods :

(a) USEPA method 314.0, "Determination of Perchlorate in Drinking Water using Ion Chromatography." Method 314.0 may be used for the determination of perchlorate in reagent water, surface water, ground water, and finished drinking water using ion chromatography.

(b) USEPA method 504.1, "1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB), 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP), and 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (123TCP) in Water by Microextraction and Gas Chromatography." Method 504.1 may be used to measure 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (dibromochloropropane or DBCP) and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide or EDB).

(c) USEPA method 505, "Analysis of Organohalide Pesticides and Commercial Polychlorinated Biphenyl Products (Aroclors) in Water by Microextraction and Gas Chromatography." Method 505 may be used to measure alachlor, atrazine, chlordane, endrin, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, lindane, methoxychlor, simazine, and toxaphene. Method 505 may also be used as a screen for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). When any aroclor (PCB) listed in rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code is found to be present in a concentration of 0.0001 milligram per liter or more, the sample shall be reanalyzed by method 508A to provide quantitative results for polychlorinated byphenyl concentrations in the water sample.

(d) USEPA method 507, "Determination of Nitrogen- and Phosphorus-Containing Pesticides in Ground Water by Gas Chromatography with a Nitrogen-Phosphorus Detector." Method 507 may be used to measure alachlor, atrazine, and simazine.

(e) USEPA method 508, "Determination of Chlorinated Pesticides in Water by Gas Chromatography with an Electron Capture Detector." Method 508 may be used to measure chlordane, endrin, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclopentadiene (when "Technical Notes" requirement is met), lindane, methoxychlor, and toxaphene. Method 508 may also be used as a screen for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). When any aroclor (PCB) listed in rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code is found to be present in a concentration of 0.0001 milligram per liter or more, the sample shall be reanalyzed by method 508A to provide quantitative results for polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations in the water sample.

(f) USEPA method 508.1, "Determination of Chlorinated Pesticides, Herbicides, and Organohalides by Liquid-Solid Extraction and Electron Capture Gas Chromatography." Method 508.1 may be used to measure alachlor, aldrin, atrazine, chlordane, endrin, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, lindane, methoxychlor, and simazine.

(g) USEPA method 508A, "Screening for Polychlorinated Biphenyls by Perchlorination and Gas Chromatography." Method 508A is used to quantitate polychlorinated biphenyls as decachlorobiphenyl if one or more aroclor(s) (or PCBs) are detected in analysis by method 505, 508, or 508.1.

(h) USEPA method 515.1, "Determination of Chlorinated Acids in Water by Gas Chromatography with an Electron Capture Detector" as revised May 1991. An alternate derivatization is given in "Technical Notes."Method 515.1 may be used to measure 2,4-D, dalapon, dinoseb, pentachlorophenol, picloram, and 2,4,5-TP (Silvex).

(i) USEPA method 515.2, "Determination of Chlorinated Acids in Water Using Liquid-Solid Extraction and Gas Chromatography With an Electron Capture Detector." An alternate derivatization is given is "Technical Notes." Method 515.2 may be used to measure 2,4-D, dinoseb, pentachlorophenol, picloram, and 2,4,5-TP (Silvex).

(j) USEPA method 515.3, "Determination of Chlorinated Acids in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Extraction, Derivatization and Gas Chromatography with Electron-Capture Detection" may be used to measure 2,4-D, 2,4,5-TP, dalapon, dinoseb, pentachlorophenol, and picloram.

(k) USEPA method 525.2, "Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water by Liquid-Solid Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry" as revised March 1994. Method 525.2 may be used to measure alachlor, atrazine, chlordane, di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, endrin, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, lindane, methoxychlor, pentachlorophenol, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (including benzo(a)pyrene), simazine, and toxaphene.

(l) USEPA method 531.1, "Measurement of N-Methyl Carbamoyloximes and N-Methyl Carbamates in Water by Direct Aqueous Injection HPLC with Post-Column Derivatization." Sample storage requirements are modified in "Technical Notes." Method 531.1 may be used to measure carbofuran and oxamyl.

(m) USEPA method 531.2, "Measurement of N-Methylcarbamoyloximes and N-Methylcarbamates in Water by Direct Aqueous Injection HPLC with Postcolumn Derivatization."

(n) USEPA method 547, "Determination of Glyphosate in Drinking Water by Direct-Aqueous-Injection HPLC, Post-Column Derivatization, and Fluorescence Detection." Method 547 may be used to measure glyphosate.

(o) USEPA method 548.1, "Determination of Endothall in Drinking Water by Aqueous Derivatization, Liquid-Solid Extraction, and Gas Chromatography with Electron-Capture Detection." Method 548.1 may be used to measure endothall.

(p) USEPA method 549.2, "Determination of Diquat and Paraquat in Drinking Water by Liquid-Solid Extraction and HPLC with Ultraviolet Detection." Sample bottle requirements are modified in "Technical Notes." Method 549.2 may be used to measure diquat.

(q) USEPA method 550, "Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Extraction and HPLC with Coupled Ultraviolet and Fluorescence Detection." Method 550 may be used to measure polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including benzo(a)pyrene.

(r) USEPA method 550.1, "Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Drinking Water by Liquid-Solid Extraction and HPLC with Coupled Ultraviolet and Fluorescence Detection." Method 550.1 may be used to measure polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including benzo(a)pyrene.

(s) USEPA method 551.1, "Determination of Chlorination Disinfection Byproducts, Chlorinated Solvents and Halogenated Pesticides/Herbicides in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Gas Chromatography with Electron-Capture Detection." Method 551.1 may be used to measure 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (dibromochloropropane or DBCP), 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide or EDB), alachlor, atrazine, endrin, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, lindane, methoxychlor and simazine.

(t) USEPA method 552.1 Rev. 1.0, "Determination of Haloacetic Acids and Dalapon in Drinking Water by Ion Exchange Liquid-Solid Extraction and Gas Chromatography With Electron Detection." Method 552.1 may be used to measure dalapon.

(u) USEPA 552.2 Rev. 1.0, "Determination of Haloacetic Acids and Dalapon in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Extraction, Derivatization and Gas Chromatography with Electron-Capture Detection," may be used to measure dalapon.

(v) USEPA 552.3 Rev. 1.0, "Determination of Haloacetic Acids and Dalapon in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Microextraction, Derivatization, and Gas Chromatography with Electron Capture Detection."

(w) USEPA method 555, "Determination of Chlorinated Acids in Water by High Performance Liquid Chromatography With a Photodiode Array Ultraviolet Detector." Method 555 may be used to measure 2,4-D, dicamba, dinoseb, pentachlorophenol, picloram, and 2,4,5-TP (Silvex).

(x) USEPA method 1613, "Tetra- through Octa-Chlorinated Dioxins and Furans by Isotope-Dilution HRGC/HRMS." Method 1613 may be used to measure the compounds in its title, including 2,3,7,8-TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or dioxin).

(y) "Standard Methods" and "Standard Methods Online" supplement method 6610 (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first), "Carbamate Pesticides High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Method." Sample storage requirements are modified in "Technical Notes." This method 6610 may be used to measure carbofuran and oxamyl.

(z) "Standard Methods" and "Standard Methods Online" method 6651 (nineteenth, twentieth), "Glyphosate Herbicide Liquid Chromatographic Postcolumn Fluorescence Method." Method 6651 may be used to measure glyphosate.

(aa) "Syngenta" method AG-625, "Atrazine in Drinking Water by Immunoassay." Copies may be obtained from "Syngenta Crop Protection, P.O. Box 18300, Greensboro, NC, 27419, 800-334-9481 x2368."

(C) Analyses conducted to determine compliance with rules 3745-81-10 ,3745-81-43,3745-81-70 to 3745-81-74, and 3745-83-01 of the Administrative Code shall use the following methods. The analytical methods referred to as "Standard Methods" sections in paragraphs (C)(1) to (C)(3) of this rule are printed in the indicated sections of the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first editions of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, by the American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, and Water Pollution Control Association, dated 1992, 1995, 1998 and 2006 respectively." "Standard Methods Online" stands for online versions of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater." These methods can be found at www.standardmethods.org. The year in which each method was approved by the standard methods committee is designated by the last two digits in the method number. The method referred to as EMSL93 method 300.0 in paragraph (C)(4) of this rule may be found in the manual defined in paragraph (A) of this rule as EMSL93.

Methods which have been determined to be equivalent to an approved method, by "USEPA Alternative Test Procedure (ATP) program at the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water's Technical Support Center (OGWDW/TSC)," may be used for compliance monitoring. Equivalent methods will be referenced as the method is listed in this rule with no special notation. The letter of equivalence issued by USEPA's ATP program at OGWDW/TSC must be maintained by the certified laboratory and be available for verification.

(1) Residual disinfectant concentrations shall be analyzed by the following methods from "Standard Methods", subject to some corrections published in "Technical Notes" (defined in paragraph (A) of this rule).

(a) Residual disinfectant concentrations for free chlorine and combined chlorine (chloramines) shall be measured by persons acceptable to the director. Residual disinfectant concentrations shall be measured by a method in section 4500-Cl D (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (amperometric titration method) for free, combined, or total chlorine, section 4500-Cl E (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) for total chlorine (low-level amperometric titration method), section 4500-Cl F (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (DPD ferrous titrimetric method) for free, combined or total chlorine, section 4500-Cl G (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (DPD colorimetric method) for free, combined or total chlorine, section 4500-Cl H (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (syringaldazine (FACTS) method) for free chlorine, section 4500-Cl I (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (iodometric electrode technique) for total chlorine, or "Standard Methods Online" section 4500-Cl D-00, section 4500-Cl E-00, section 4500-Cl F-00 section 4500-Cl G-00, section 4500-Cl H-00, section 4500-Cl I-00. Residual disinfectant concentrations for free chlorine and combined chlorine may also be measured by using DPD colorimetric test kits. A DPD colorimetric test kit acceptable to the director is one that uses electronic measurement of the color development. It shall also have a digital display of the result. DPD colorimetric test kits with an analog display are not acceptable for use. An acceptable DPD colorimetric test kit shall have a method detection limit of 0.1 mg/L. A written protocol for quantitative dilution of samples shall be kept on file. This protocol shall be approved by the director before a colorimeter is approved for use for determining compliance with the MRDL for total chlorine. Free or total chlorine must be measured for demonstrating compliance with the chlorine MRDL and combined chlorine, or total chlorine must be measured for demonstrating compliance with the chloramine MRDL.

(b) Residual disinfectant concentrations for free and total chlorine may be measured by EPA method 334.0, "Determination of Residual Chlorine in Drinking Water Using an On-line Chlorine Analyzer," August 2009 (EPA 815-B-09-013). A copy of this method can be accessed and downloaded on-line athttp://epa.gov/safewater/methods/analyticalmethods_ogwdw.html. Residual disinfectant concentrations may also be measured by, "ChloroSense, Measurement of Free and Total Chlorine in Drinking Water," September 2009. A copy of this method can be downloaded from NEMI at http://www.nemi.gov or from "Palintest Ltd, 21 Kenton Lands Road, PO Box 18395, Erlanger, KY 41018."

(c) Residual disinfectant concentrations for chlorine dioxide shall be measured by persons acceptable to the director and using a method in section 4500-ClO 2 C ( nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (amperometric method I) or section 4500-ClO 2 D ( nineteenth, twentieth) (DPD method) or section 4500-ClO 2 E (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first)(amperometric method II), or "Standard Methods Online" section 4500-ClO 2 C-00 or 4500-ClO 2 E-00, or EPA Method 327.0 Rev. 1.1. An acceptable DPD colorimetric test kit may be used for determining chlorine dioxide by "Standard Methods" 4500-ClO 2.

(d) Residual disinfectant concentrations for ozone shall be measured by the method in section 4500-O 3 B (indigo colorimetric method) (twenty-first), or "Standard Methods Online" section 4500-O 3 B-97, or automated methods which are calibrated in reference to the results obtained by the indigo method on a regular basis, if approved by the director.

(2) Measurements of the plant control tests shall be conducted by a person designated on a valid laboratory certificate of approval as required under rule 3745-89-03 of the Administrative Code and using the following methods.

(a) Alkalinity: "Standard Methods" section 2320 (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 2320 B-97 (alkalinity).

(b) Alkalinity Stability: "Standard Methods" section 2330 (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth) (Langelier's Index).

(c) pH: "Standard Methods" section 4500-H+ B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first), or "Standard Methods Online" section 4500-H+ B-00 (pH value), or EPA method 150.1(electrometric) or 150.2 (continuous monitoring electrometric).

(d) Total dissolved solids: "Standard Methods" section 2540 C (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 2540 C-97 (total dissolved solids dried at one hundred eighty degrees Celsius).

(3) Turbidity shall be measured by a person designated on a valid certificate of approval as required under rule 3745-89-03 of the Administrative Code and using"Standard Methods" section 2130 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 2130 B-01 (nephelometric method); USEPA method 180.1 Rev. 2.0(nephelometric) as described in "Methods for the Determination of Inorganic Substances in Environmental Samples, EPA-600/R-93-100, August 1993," which is available from the "National Technical Information Service (NTIS)" as PB94-120821; or "Great Lakes Instruments Method 2," November 2, 1992, with information available from "GLI International, Inc., 9020 West Dean Road, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53224, telephone number 414-355-3601." "Thermo Scientific's Orion Method AQ4500 (May 8, 2009)" can be downloaded from "National Environmental Methods Index (NEMI)" at http://www.nemi.gov or obtained from "Thermo Scientific, 166 Cummings Center, Beverly, MA 01915," 800-225-1480. "Mitchell Method M5271 and Mitchell Method M5331 (March 5, 2009)" can be downloaded from NEMI at http://www.nemi.gov or obtained from "Leck Mitchell, PHD, PE, 656 Independence Valley Dr., Grand Junction, CO 81507." "Hach" FilterTrak 10133 Rev 2.0, "Determination of Turbidity by Laser Nephelometry." Copies may be obtained from "Hach Co., P.O. Box 389, Loveland, CO 80539-0389, 800-227-4224." "AMI Turbiwell Method (SWAN Analytische Instrumente)," August 2009. A copy of the "AMI Turbiwell Method" can be downloaded from NEMI at http://www.nemi.gov or obtained by contacting "Markus Bernasconi, SWAN Analytische Instrumente AG, Studbachstrasse 13, CH-8340 Hinwil, Switzerland." Some additional calibration information is given in "Technical Notes." Styrene divinyl benzene beads (e.g., AMCO-AEPA-1 or equivalent) and stabilized formazin (e.g., Hach StablCalTM or equivalent) are acceptable substitutes for formazin.

(4) Analysis to determine compliance with rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted by a person designated on a valid laboratory certificate of approval as required under rule 3745-89-03 of the Administrative Code and using the following methods.

(a) Alkalinity: "Standard Methods" section 2320 B or U.S. geological survey method I-1030-85.

(b) Magnesium: "Standard Methods" section 3111 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twenty-first) or 3120 B (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or 3500 Mg B (twenty-first) or 3500-Mg E (eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 3111 B-99 or 3120 B-99 or 3500-Mg E-97 or EMSL 94 method 200.7 Rev. 4.4(1994) or EPA method 200.5 Rev. 4.2(2003).

(c) Total organic carbon (TOC) or dissolved organic carbon (DOC): supplement to "Standard Methods" section 5310 B ( nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (high-temperature combustion method) or 5310 C ( nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (persulfate-ultraviolet or heated-persulfate oxidation method) or 5310 D ( nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) (wet-oxidation method), or "Standard Methods Online" section 5310 B-00 or 5310 C-00 or 5310 D-00, or EPA method 415.3 Rev. 1.2, "Determination of Total Organic Carbon and Specific UV Absorbance at 254 nm in Source Water and Drinking Water," August 2009 (EPA/600/R-09/122) can be accessed and downloaded on-line at http://epa.gov/nerlcww/ordmeth.htm. TOC samples must not be filtered prior to any analysis. Inorganic carbon must be removed from the samples prior to analysis. TOC samples must be acidified at the time of sample collection to achieve pH less than or equal to two with minimal addition of the acid specified in the method or by the instrument manufacturer. Acidified TOC samples must be analyzed within twenty-eight days. DOC samples must be filtered through the 0.45 micrometer pore-diameter filter as soon as practical after sampling, not to exceed forty-eight hours. After filtration, DOC samples must be acidified to achieve pH less than or equal to two with minimal addition of the acid specified in the method or by the instrument manufacturer. Acidified DOC samples must be analyzed within twenty-eight days of sample collection. Water passed through the filter prior to filtration of the sample must serve as the filtered blank. This filtered blank must be analyzed using the procedures identical to those used for analysis of the samples and must meet the following criteria: DOC is less than 0.5 milligrams per liter.

(d) Ultraviolet absorption at two hundred fifty-four nanometers (UV254). "Standard Methods" 5910 B ( nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 5910 B-00 (ultraviolet absorption method), or EPA method 415.3 Rev. 1.2, "Determination of Total Organic Carbon and Specific UV Absorbance at 254 nm in Source Water and Drinking Water (USEPA 2009f), can be accessed and downloaded on-line at http://www.epa.gov/nerlcww/ordmeth.htm. UV absorption must be measured at 253.7 nanometers, which may be rounded off to two hundred fifty-four nanometers. Prior to analysis, UV 254 samples must be filtered through a 0.45 micrometer pore-diameter filter.The pH of the UV 254 sample may not be adjusted. Samples must be analyzed as soon as practical after sampling, not to exceed forty-eight hours.

(e) pH: "Standard Methods" section 4500-H+ B (nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first) or "Standard Methods Online" section 4500-H+ B-00 (pH value).

(D) Analyses conducted to determine compliance with rules 3745-81-14 , 3745-81-21, 3745-81-42 and 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code shall be conducted by a person designated on a valid laboratory certificate of approval as required under rule 3745-89-03 of the Administrative Code.

The approved analytical methods in this paragraph are in the twentieth edition of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, by the American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, and Water Pollution Control Federation, 1998," referred to as "Standard Methods" in the rest of this paragraph.

(1) The standard sample volume required for a total coliform analysis is one hundred milliliters. The time from sample collection to initiation of analysis shall not exceed thirty hours. Systems are encouraged but not required to hold samples below ten degrees Celsius during transit.

(2) Total coliform analyses shall be conducted in accordance with one of the following methods.

(a) Membrane filter (MF) technique, as set forth in "Standard Methods" section 9222 B.

(b) Enzyme substrate coliform test (MMO-MUG), as partially described in "Standard Methods" section 9223 and further explained in the twentieth (1998) edition of "Standard Methods" section 9223. Colilert-18 is referenced as 9223-18 for certification purposes.

(c) Modified colitag, "Modified ColitagTMTest Method for Simultaneous Detection of E.coli and other Total Coliforms in Water (ATP D-05-0035)," August 28, 2009. A copy of this method can be downloaded from NEMI at http://www.nemi.gov or obtained by contacting, "CPI International, 580 Skylane Boulevard, Santa Rosa, CA 95403."

(3) Fecal coliform analysis, for cases in which membrane filter analysis gives total coliform-positive results, shall use EC medium. Nutrient EC medium preparation as set forth in "Standard Methods" section 9221 E.

The total coliform-positive culture is transferred by the following method:

(a) Swab the entire membrane filter surface with a sterile swab and transfer the inoculum to EC medium (do not leave the swab in the EC medium).

(b) Gently shake the inoculated tubes of EC medium to ensure adequate mixing and incubate in a waterbath at 44.5 ± 0.2 degrees Celsius for twenty-four plus or minus two hours. Gas production of any amount in the inner fermentation tube of the EC medium indicates a positive fecal coliform test. Public water systems need only determine the presence or absence of fecal coliforms; a determination of fecal coliform density is not required.

(4) Escherichia coli (E. coli) analysis shall be done by a method identified in paragraphs (D)(2)(b) and (D)(2)(c) of this rule. These methods allow simultaneous determination of the presence or absence of total coliforms and E. coli when applied to drinking water samples, but they are not approved for determining whether bacteria samples resulting from membrane filter tests contain E. coli.

(E) The methods listed in Table A shall be used to determine compliance with rules 3745-81-15 and 3745-81-26 of the Administrative Code(radioactivity) except in cases where alternative approaches have been approved by the United States environmental protection agency and the director.

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1 "Prescribed Procedures for Measurement of Radioactivity in Drinking Water,"EPA 600/4-80-032, August 1980. Available at "U.S. Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service (NTIS), 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 (Telephone 800-553-6847), PB 80-224744."

2 "Interim Radiochemical Methodology for Drinking Water," EPA 600/4-75-008 (revised), March 1976. Available at NTIS, ibid. PB 253258.

3 "Radiochemistry Procedures Manual," EPA 520/5-84-006, December 1987. Available at NTIS, ibid. PB 84-215581.

4 "Radiochemical Analytical Procedures for Analysis of Environmental Samples,"March 1979. Available at NTIS, ibid. EMSL LV 053917.

5 "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater," thirteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first editions, 1971, 1989, 1992, 1995, 1998 and 2006. Available at "American Public Health Association, 1015 Fifteenth Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005." Online versions of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater" are available at http://www.standardmethods.org/. The approval year assigned by the "Standard Methods Committee" is designated by the last two digits of the method number. All methods are in the seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth editions except 7500-U C Fluorometric Uranium was discontinued after the seventeenth edition, 7120 Gamma Emitters is only in the nineteenth and twentieth editions, and 302, 303, 304, 305 and 306 are only in the thirteenth edition.

6 Natural uranium and thorium-230 are approved as gross alpha calibration standards for gross alpha with co-precipitation and evaporation methods; americium-241 is approved with co-precipitation methods.

7 If uranium (U) is determined by mass, a 0.67 pCi/µg of uranium conversion factor must be used. This conversion factor is based on the 1:1 activity ratio of U-234 to U-238 that is characteristic of naturally occurring uranium.

(F) Analyses for water quality parameters required by rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code shall be made in accordance with methods listed in paragraph (A) of this rule for calcium, orthophosphate, and silica and shall be made in accordance with methods listed in paragraph (C) of this rule for alkalinity, conductivity, pH, and temperature. As long as the methods are properly followed, these analyses do not have to be performed in a laboratory approved by the director nor does the person performing these analyses have to be designated on a valid laboratory certificate of approval.

(G) Analytical techniques alternative to those of this rule may be used only with the written approval of the director, concurred in by the administrator of the United States environmental protection agency. An alternative technique shall be acceptable only if it is substantially equivalent to the prescribed test in both precision and accuracy as it relates to the determination of compliance with any maximum contaminant level or monitoring requirements. The use of an alternative analytic technique shall not decrease the frequency of monitoring required by this chapter.

(H) Cryptosporidium. The following requirements apply to source water monitoring conducted in accordance with rules 3745-81-64 to 3745-81-69 of the Administrative Code.

Systems shall analyze for Cryptosporidium using method 1623: "Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA," 2005, United States environmental protection agency, EPA-815-R-05-002 or method 1622, "Cryptosporidium in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA," 2005, United States environmental protection agency, EPA-815-R-05-001, which are incorporated by reference. The director of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) C.F.R. part 51. A copy of these methods may be obtained online from http://www.epa.gov/safewater/disinfection/lt2 or from the United States environmental protection agency, office of ground water and drinking water, 1201 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (Telephone: 800-426-4791). A copy may be inspected at the "Water Docket in the EPA Docket Center, 1301 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC, (Telephone: 202-566-2426)" or at the "National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)." For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ ibr_locations.html.

(1) Systems shall analyze at least a ten liters sample or a packed pellet volume of at least two milliliters as generated by the methods listed in paragraph (H) of this rule. Systems unable to process a ten liter sample must analyze as much sample volume as can be filtered by two filters approved by EPA for the methods listed in paragraph (H) of this rule, up to a packed pellet volume of a least two milliliters.

(2) Matrix spike (MS) samples, as required by the methods in paragraph (H) of this rule, shall be spiked and filtered by a laboratory approved for Cryptosporidium analysis in accordance with rule 3745-89-11 of the Administrative Code.

(3) If the volume of the MS sample is greater than ten liters, the system may filter all but ten liters of the MS sample in the field, and ship the filtered sample and the remaining ten liters of source water to the laboratory. In this case, the laboratory shall spike the remaining ten liters of water and filter it through the filter used to collect the balance of the sample in the field.

(4) Flow cytometer-counted spiking suspensions shall be used for MS samples and ongoing precision and recovery (OPR) samples.

(I) E. coli. The following requirements apply to source water monitoring conducted in accordance with rules 3745-81-64 to 3745-81-69 of the Administrative Code.

Systems shall use methods for enumeration of E. coli in source water as approved in 40 C.F.R. 136.3(a) .

(1) The time from sample collection to initiation of analysis may not exceed thirty hours unless the system meets the condition of paragraph (I)(2) of this rule.

(2) The director may accept on a case-by-case basis the holding of an E. coli sample for up to forty-eight hours between sample collection and initiation of analysis if the director determines that analyzing an E. coli sample within thirty hours is not feasible. E. coli samples held between thirty to forty-eight hours shall be analyzed by the Colilert reagent version of standard method 9223 B as listed in 40 C.F.R. 136.3(a) .

(3) Systems shall maintain samples between zero degrees Celsius and ten degrees Celsius during storage and transit to the laboratory.

(J) Turbidity. The following requirements apply to source water monitoring conducted in accordance with rules 3745-81-64 to 3745-81-69 of the Administrative Code.

Systems shall use methods for turbidity measurement approved in paragraph (C)(3) of this rule.

(K) Ground water rule, assessment source water monitoring. The methods listed in Table B shall be used to determine compliance with rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code(ground water source microbial monitoring and analytical methods).

Table B. Analytical methods for assessment source water monitoring.

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-27_ph_ff_a_ru_20101021_0855-4.png

(Analyses using methods in Table B shall be conducted in accordance with the documents listed below.)

1The time from sample collection to initiation of analysis may not exceed thirty hours. The ground water system is encouraged but is not required to hold samples below ten degrees Celsius during transit.

2Methods are described in "Standard Methods" (twentieth edition, 1998) and copies may be obtained from the "American Public Health Association, 1015 Fifteenth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005-2605."

3Medium is available through "IDEXX Laboratories, Inc., One IDEXX Drive, Westbrook, Maine 04092."

4EPA method 1604: "Total Coliforms and Escherichia coli in Water by Membrane Filtration Using a Simultaneous Detection Technique (MI Medium); September 2002, EPA 821-R-02-024." Method is available at http://www.epa.gov/nerlcwww/1604ap02.pdf or from "EPA's Water Resource Center (RC-4100T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20460."

5A description of the m-ColiBlue24 Test, "Total Coliforms and E. coli Membrane Filtration Method with m-ColiBlue24 Broth," method number 10029 Rev.2, August 17, 1999, is available from "Hach Company, 100 Dayton Ave., Ames, IA 50010" or from "EPA's Water Resource Center (RC-4100T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460."

6A description of the E*Colite Test, "Charm E*Colite Presence/Absence Test for Detection and Identification of Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia coli in Drinking Water," January 9, 1998 is available from "Charm Sciences, Inc., 659 Andover St., Lawrence, MA 01843-1032 or from EPA's Water Resource Center (RC-4100T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460."

7EC-MUG (method 9221 F) or NA-MUG (method 9222 G) can be used for E. coli testing steps as described in 40 C.F.R 141.21(f)(6)(i) and 40 C.F.R. 141.21(f)(6)(ii) after use of standard methods 9221 B, 9221 D, 9222 B, or 9222 C.

8EPA method 1600: "Enterococci in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane-Enterococcus Indoxyl-beta-D-Glucoside Agar (mEI) EPA 821-R-02-022 (September 2002)" is an approved variation of standard method 9230 C. The method is available at http://www.epa.gov/nerlcwww/1600sp02.pdf or from "EPA's Water Resource Center (RC-4100T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460." The holding time and temperature for ground water samples are specified in footnote 1 above, rather than as specified in Section 8 of EPA Method 1600.

9Medium is available through "IDEXX Laboratories, Inc., One IDEXX Drive, Westbrook, Maine 04092." Preparation and use of the medium is set forth in the article "Evaluation of Enterolert for Enumeration of Enterococci in Recreational Waters," by Budnick, G.E., Howard, R.T., and Mayo, D.R., 1996 "Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 62:3881-2884."

10EPA method 1601: "Male-specific (F+) and Somatic Coliphage in Water by Two-step Enrichment Procedure; April 2001, EPA 821-R-01-030." Method is available at http://www.epa.gov/nerlcwww/1601ap01.pdf or from "EPA's Water Resource Center (RC-4100T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460."

11EPA method 1602: "Male-specific (F+) and Somatic Coliphage in Water by Single Agar Layer (SAL) Procedure; April 2001, EPA 821-R-01-029." Method is available athttp://www.epa.gov/nerlcww/1602ap01.pdf or from "EPA's Water Resource Center (RC-4100T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460."

12Readycult method, "Readycult Coliforms 100 Presence/Absence Test for Detection and Identification of Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia coli in Finished Waters," January, 2007. Version 1.1. Available from EMD Chemicals (affiliate of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany), 480 S Democrat road, Gibbstown, NJ 08027-1297.

13Modified ColitagTM; method, "Modified ColitagTMTest Method for the Simultaneous Detection of E. coli and other Total Coliforms in Water (ATP D05-0035)," August 28, 2009. Available at http://www.nemi.gov or from CPI international, 5580 Skylane boulevard, Santa Rosa, CA 95403.

14Chromocult method, "Chromocult Coliform Agar Presence/Absence Membrane Filter Test Method for Detection and Identification of Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia coli in Finished Waters," November, 2000. Version 1.0. EMD chemicals (affiliate of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany), 480 S. Democrat road, Gibbstown, NJ 08027-1297.

[Comment: The inorganic chemical analysis methods are described in books and manuals referred to in this rule as "Standard Methods," "Technical Notes," EMSL94, and EMSL93. The United States environmental protection agency books and manuals are available from the "National Technical Information Service (or NTIS), United States Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161," with telephone number 800-553-6847. A copy of the eighteenth, nineteenth or twentieth edition of standard methods may be obtained from "AWWA Bookstore, 6666 W Quincy Avenue, Denver, CO, 80235-3098," (303) 795-2114. These documents are available for review at "Ohio EPA, Lazarus Government Center, 50 West Town Street, Suite 700, Columbus, OH, 43215-3425." USEPA books and manuals are also available from the "National Service Center for Environmental Publications (or NSCEP), P.O. Box 42419, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242-0419," or http://www.epa.gov/nscep.]

[Comment: The organic chemical analysis methods referred to in this rule are included in manuals prepared by the "Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Cincinnati of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)." These manuals may be purchased from the "National Technical Information Service (NTIS), U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161," with telephone number 800-553-6847. They are also available to government agencies from "ORD Publications, 26 West MLK Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 45268-1072," with telephone number 513-569-7562. These documents are available for review at "Ohio EPA, Lazarus Government Center, 50 West Town Street, Suite 700, Columbus, OH, 43215-3425." USEPA books and manuals are also available from the "National Service Center for Environmental Publications (or NSCEP), P.O. Box 42419, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242-0419," or http://www.epa.gov/nscep.]

[Comment: Except for the colisure test, the approved bacteriological analytical methods referred to in this rule are the eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth or twenty-first edition of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, by the American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, and Water Pollution Control Federation," dated 1992, 1995 and 1998 respectively. A copy of the eighteenth, nineteenth or twentieth edition of Standard Methods may be obtained from "AWWA Bookstore, 6666 W Quincy Avenue, Denver, CO, 80235-3098," (303) 795-2114. These documents are available for review at "Ohio EPA, Lazarus Government Center, 50 West Town Street, Suite 700, Columbus, OH, 43215-3425." A copy of the colisure test may be obtained from "Millipore Corporation, Technical Services Department, 80 Ashby Road, P.O. Box 9125, Bedford, Massachusetts 01730-9125," 800-645-5476. This document is available for review at "Ohio EPA, Lazarus Government Center, 50 West Town Street, Suite 700, Columbus, OH, 43215-3425."]

Effective: 10/31/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/16/2010 and 10/31/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/12/78, 5/22/89, 12/31/90, 9/13/93, 4/1/96, 01/01/02, 06/28/03, 10/13/2008, 01/08/10

3745-81-28 Acceptability of analytical results.

Analytical results for the purpose of determining compliance with this chapter may be considered only if they have been determined and reported by a laboratory certified by or otherwise acceptable to the director under Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code, except that measurements for free, total, or combined chlorine residual may be performed by any person acceptable to the director and reported to the director by the public water system.

R.C. 119.032 review dates: 04/24/2014 and 04/24/2019
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 5/22/89, 04/01/99

3745-81-29 Monitoring of consecutive public water systems.

When a public water system supplies water to one or more other public water systems, teh director may modify the monitoring requirements imposed by this chapter to the extent that the interconnection of the systems justifies treating them as a single system for monitoring purposes. Any modified monitoring shall be conducted pursuant to a schedule specified by the director and concurred in by the administrator of the U.S. environmental protection agency.

Eff 12-27-78
Rule promulgated under: Section 3, Am. Sub. S.B. 445 112th General Assembly
Rule amplifies: RC 6109.04

3745-81-31 Reporting requirements for public water systems.

(A) Except where a different reporting period is specified in this chapter, the public water system is responsible for ensuring that the results of a test, measurement, or analysis required to be made by this chapter are reported to the director within the first ten days following the month in which the result is received for that test, measurement, or analysis or within the first ten days following the end of the required monitoring period as specified by the director, whichever occurs first.

(B) The director may invalidate sample results that do not contain complete and accurate sample location information, as well as results of obvious sampling or analytical error.

(C) The public water system shall report to the director within forty-eight hours the failure to comply with any requirement of state primary drinking water rules, unless otherwise stated in this chapter that the director will determine compliance.

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/18/2009 and 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 9/13/93, 4/1/1999

3745-81-32 Public notification.

(A) General requirements for public notification by public water systems.

(1) The owner or operator of a public water system shall provide public notice to persons served by that public water system in accordance with this rule. Public water systems that sell or otherwise provide drinking water to other public water systems (i.e., to consecutive systems) are required to give public notice in accordance with this rule to the owner or operator of the consecutive system; the consecutive system is responsible for providing public notice in accordance with this rule to the persons it serves.

(2) If a community public water system has a violation in a portion of the distribution system that is physically or hydraulically isolated from other parts of the distribution system as described in the emergency contingency plan required by Chapter 3745-85 of the Administrative Code, the director may allow the system to limit distribution of the public notice to only persons served by that portion of the system which is out of compliance. Permission for limited distribution shall be granted in writing by the director.

(3) The public water system, within ten days of completing the public notification requirements under this rule for the initial public notice and any repeat notices, must submit to the director a completed verification form indicating that is has fully complied with the public notification regulations. The public water system must include with this certification a representative copy of each type of notice distributed, published, posted, and made available to the persons served by the system and to the media.

(B) Tier 1 public notification requirements.

(1) The owner or operator of a public water system with any of the following violations or situations that may pose an acute risk to human health, shall notify the persons served by the public water system in accordance with paragraph (B)(3) of this rule:

(a) Any violation or situation specified by the director as posing an acute risk to human health.

(b) Violation of the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for nitrate and nitrite as established in rule 3745-81-11 of the Administrative Code and determined according to rule 3745-81-23 of the Administrative Code.

(c) Violation of the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms, as specified in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-14 of the Administrative Code.

(d) Violation of monitoring and reporting repeat samples for total coliforms, as specified in paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code.

(e) Occurrence of a waterborne disease outbreak in a public water system, as defined in rule 3745-81-01 of the Administrative Code, or waterborne emergency as specified by the director.

(f) Violation of the maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) for chlorine dioxide as defined in rule 3745-81-10 of the Administrative Code and determined according to rule 3745-81-70 of the Administrative Code.

(g) Exceedance of the turbidity level in representative samples of filtered water as specified in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code and one or more of the following occurs:

(i) The public water system fails to consult with the director within twenty-four hours after learning of the violation;

(ii) Any failure in an individual treatment process where the treatment process does not operate as designed and approved;

(iii) The director determines after consultation that a Tier 1 notice is required.

(h) Public water systems with a fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample collected under paragraph (A) or (B) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code. This requirement also applies to consecutive systems supplied by the ground water source.

(2) The owner or operator of a public water system with a physical or operational disruption shall notify the persons served in the affected area of the public water system in accordance with paragraph (B)(3) of this rule when any sample (including special purpose samples) taken after minimum pressure falls below twenty pounds per square inch gauge at ground level and within the affected area of disruption is determined to be E. coli positive or fecal coliform positive.

(a) Tier 1 notice is not required if the system issued a precautionary notice as approved by the director through the public water system's contingency plan required by Chapter 3745-85 of the Administrative Code and a follow-up notice identifying the E. coli or fecal coliform results is issued to persons who received the preliminary notice.

(b) The Tier 1 notice shall remain in effect until total coliforms are not detected in consecutive samples collected twenty-four hours apart. The number of samples to be collected each day must be representative of the affected area, but shall not be less than two samples per day.

(3) Public water systems shall:

(a) Provide a public notice as soon as practical but no later than twenty-four hours after the system learns of the violation or situation, using one or more of the following forms of delivery in order to reach all persons served:

(i) Appropriate broadcast media (such as radio and television);

(ii) Posting of the notice in conspicuous locations throughout the area served by the water system;

(iii) Hand delivery of the notice to persons served by the water system; or

(iv) Another delivery method approved in writing by the director.

(b) Initiate consultation with the director as soon as practical, but no later than twenty-four hours after the public water system learns of the violation or situation, to determine additional public notice requirements; and

(c) Comply with any additional public notification requirements (including any repeat notices or direction on the duration of the posted notices) that are established as a result of the consultation with the director. Such requirements may include the timing, form, manner, frequency, and content of repeat notices (if any) and other actions designed to reach all persons served.

(C) Tier 2 public notification requirements.

(1) The owner or operator of a public water system with any of the following violations or situations shall notify the persons served by the public water system in accordance with paragraph (C)(2) of this rule:

(a) All violations of the MCL, MRDL, and treatment technique requirements pursuant to this chapter, except those specified in paragraph (B)(1) of this rule.

(b) Failure to collect any three samples of source water monitoring as specified in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code for the"Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule."

(c) Failure to determine and report bin classification or mean Cryptosporidium level required by paragraphs (A) to (D) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code for the"Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule."

(d) Any other violation or situation specified by the director.

(2) Public water systems shall:

(a) Provide a public notice as soon as practical, but no later than thirty days after the system learns of the violation or situation.

(i) Community public water systems shall provide notice using the following forms of delivery in order to reach all persons served:

(a) Mail or other direct delivery to each customer receiving a bill and to other service connections to which water is delivered by the public water system; and

(b) Any other method reasonably calculated to reach other persons regularly served by the system, if they would not normally be reached by the notice required in paragraph (C)(2)(a)(i)(a) of this rule. Such persons may include those who do not pay water bills or do not have service connection addresses (e.g., house renters, apartment dwellers, university students, nursing home patients, prison inmates, etc.). Other methods may include: publication in a local newspaper; delivery of multiple copies for distribution by customers that provide their drinking water to others (e.g., apartment building owners or large private employers); posting in public places served by the system or on the Internet; or delivery to community organizations. If the public notice is posted, the notice shall remain in place for as long as the violation or situation persists, but in no case for less than seven days, even if the violation or situation is resolved.

(ii) Noncommunity public water systems shall provide notice using the following forms of delivery in order to reach all persons served:

(a) Posting the notice in conspicuous locations throughout the distribution system frequented by persons served by the system, or by mail or direct delivery to each customer and service connection (where known). If the public notice is posted, the notice shall remain in place for as long as the violation or situation persists, but in no case for less than seven days, even if the violation or situation is resolved; and

(b) Any other method reasonably calculated to reach other persons served by the system if they would not normally be reached by the notice required in paragraph (C)(2)(a)(ii)(a) of this rule. Such persons may include those served who may not see a posted notice because the posted notice is not in a location they routinely pass by. When the persons served are children, such as in schools, their parents or legal guardians shall be notified. Other methods may include: publication in a local newspaper or newsletter distributed to customers; use of E-mail to notify employees or students and parents or legal guardians; or delivery of multiple copies in central locations (e.g., community centers).

(b) The public water system shall repeat the notice every three months as long as the violation or situation persists, unless the director determines that appropriate circumstances warrant a different repeat notice frequency. In no circumstances may the repeat notice be given less frequently than once per year. Permission to issue repeat notices less frequently than once every three months must be granted in writing by the director.

(c) For turbidity violations specified in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code, public water systems shall consult with the director as soon as practical but no later than twenty-four hours after the public water system learns of the violation. When the director determines after consultation that a Tier 1 notice is required, or when consultation does not take place within the twenty-four hour period, the water system shall distribute notice of the violation within the next twenty-four hours (i.e., no later than forty-eight hours after the system learns of the violation) in accordance with paragraph (B) of this rule.

(D) Tier 3 public notification requirements.

(1) The owner or operator of a public water system with any of the following violations or situations shall notify the persons served by the public water system in accordance with paragraphs (D)(2) and (D)(3) of this rule:

(a) Violations of the monitoring and testing procedure requirements pursuant to this chapter;

(b) Exceedance of the fluoride secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) as specified in Chapter 3745-82 of the Administrative Code;

(c) Availability of unregulated contaminant monitoring results, as required by 40 C.F.R. Section 141.207 (March 25, 2003); or

(d) Any other violation or situation specified by the director.

(2) Community public water systems shall provide notice as soon as practical, but no later than one year after the public water system learns of the violation or situation. The following forms of delivery shall be used in order to reach all persons served:

(a) Mail or other direct delivery to each customer receiving a bill and to other service connections to which water is delivered by the public water system; and

(b) Any other method reasonably calculated to reach other persons regularly served by the system, if they would not normally be reached by the notice required in paragraph (D)(2)(a) of this rule. Such persons may include those who do not pay water bills or do not have service connection addresses (e.g., house renters, apartment dwellers, university students, nursing home patients, prison inmates, etc.). Other methods may include: publication in a local newspaper; delivery of multiple copies for distribution by customers that provide their drinking water to others (e.g., apartment building owners or large private employers); posting in public places or on the Internet; or delivery to community organizations. If the public notice is posted, the notice shall remain in place for as long as the violation or other situation persists, but in no case less than seven days (even if the violation or situation is resolved).

(c) The consumer confidence report (CCR) required under Chapter 3745-96 of the Administrative Code may be used as a vehicle for the initial public notice and all required repeat notices, as long as:

(i) The CCR is provided to persons served within the time frames specified in paragraph (D)(2) of this rule; and

(ii) The notice contained in the CCR follows the content requirements under this rule; and

(iii) The CCR is distributed following the delivery requirements in this rule.

(3) Noncommunity water systems shall provide notice as soon as practical, but no later than thirty days after the public water system learns of the violation or situation. The following forms of delivery shall be used in order to reach all persons served:

(a) Posting the notice in conspicuous locations through the distribution system frequented by persons served by the system, or by mail or direct delivery to each customer and service connection (where known). If the public notice is posted, the notice shall remain in place for as long as the violation or other situation persists, but in no case less than seven days (even if the violation or situation is resolved); and

(b) Any other method reasonably calculated to reach other persons served by the system, if they would not normally be reached by the notice required in paragraph (D)(3)(a) of this rule. Such persons may include those who may not see a posted notice because the notice is not in a location they routinely pass by. When the persons served are children, such as in schools, their parents or legal guardians shall be notified. Other methods may include: publication in a local newspaper or newsletter distributed to customers; use of E-mail to notify employees or students and parents or legal guardians; or, delivery of multiple copies in central locations (e.g., community centers).

(4) For methods other than posting, the public water system shall repeat the notice annually for as long as the violation or other situation persists.

(5) For violations of the fluoride SMCL, the public water system shall send a copy of the notice to the local health department and the "Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Oral Health Services."

(E) Content of public notices.

(1) Each public notice, except the public notice required in paragraphs (C)(1)(b) and (C)(1)(c) of this rule, shall include the following elements:

(a) A description of the violation or situation, including the contaminant(s) of concern, the MCL, and (as applicable) the contaminant level(s);

(b) When the violation or situation occurred;

(c) Any potential adverse health effects from the violation or situation, including:

(i) Standard health effects language specified in table 1 of this rule, including the language necessary to fill in the blanks, for MCL, MRDL, treatment technique, or fluoride SMCL exceedances, or

(ii) Standard language for monitoring and testing procedure violations, including the language necessary to fill in the blanks: "We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants on a regular basis. Results of regular monitoring are an indicator of whether or not your drinking water meets health standards. During [compliance period], we "did not monitor or test" or "did not complete all monitoring or testing" for [contaminant(s)], and therefore cannot be sure of the quality of your drinking water during that time."

(d) The population at risk, including subpopulations particularly vulnerable if exposed to the contaminant in their drinking water;

(e) Whether alternative water supplies should be used;

(f) What actions consumers should take, including when they should seek medical help, if known;

(g) What the system is doing to correct the violation or situation;

(h) When the water system expects to return to compliance or resolve the situation;

(i) The name, business address, and phone number of the water system owner, operator, or designee of the public water system as a source of additional information concerning the notice; and

(j) A statement to encourage the notice recipient to distribute the public notice to other persons served, using the following standard language: "Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail."

(2) Each public notice required by paragraphs (C)(1)(b) and (C)(1)(c) of this rule shall include the following elements:

(a) The public notice for repeated failure to conduct monitoring as specified in paragraph (C)(1)(b) of this rule shall contain the following language:

"We are required to monitor the source of your drinking water for Cryptosporidium. Results of the monitoring are to be used to determine whether water treatment at the [treatment plant name] is sufficient to adequately remove Cryptosporidium from your drinking water. We are required to complete this monitoring and make this determination by [required bin determination date]. We did not monitor or test or did not complete all monitoring or testing on schedule and, therefore, we may not be able to determine by the required date what treatment modifications, if any, must be made to ensure adequate Cryptosporidium removal. Missing this deadline may, in turn jeopardize our ability to have the required treatment modifications, if any, completed by the deadline required, [date]."

"For more information, please call [contact name] of [public water system name] at [phone number]."

(b) The public notice for failure to determine bin classification or mean Cryptosporidium level as specified in paragraph (C)(1)(c) of this rule shall contain the following language:

"We are required to monitor the source of your drinking water for Cryptosporidium in order to determine by [date] whether water treatment at the [public water system name] is sufficient to adequately remove Cryptosporidium from your drinking water. We have not made this determination by the required date. Our failure to do this may jeopardize our ability to have the required treatment modifications, if any, completed by the required deadline of [date]. For more information, please call [contact name] of [public water system name] at [phone number]."

(c) Each public notice must also include a description of what the system is doing to correct the violation and when the system expects to return to compliance or resolve the situation.

(3) Presentation of the public notice.

(a) Each public notice required by this section:

(i) Shall be displayed in a conspicuous way when printed or posted;

(ii) Shall not contain overly technical language or very small print;

(iii) Shall not be formatted in a way that defeats the purpose of the notice; and

(iv) Shall not contain language which nullifies the purpose of the notice.

(b) For public water systems serving a large proportion of non-English speaking consumers, defined as ten per cent or more of the residents speaking the same non-English language, the public notice shall contain information in the appropriate language(s) regarding the importance of the notice or contain a telephone number or address where persons served may contact the water system to obtain a translated copy of the notice or to request assistance in the appropriate language.

(4) Notice to new billing units or new customers.

(a) Community water systems shall give a copy of the most recent public notice for any continuing violation, or other ongoing situations requiring a public notice to all new billing units or new customers prior to or at the time service begins.

(b) Noncommunity water systems shall continuously post the public notice in conspicuous locations in order to inform new consumers of any continuing violation or other situation requiring a public notice for as long as the violation or other situation persists.

(F) The director may give the notice required by this rule when the owner or operator of a public water system fails or refuses to comply with the requirements of this rule. However, the owner or operator of a public water system remains responsible for ensuring that the requirements of this rule are satisfied.

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Effective: 10/31/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/16/2010 and 10/31/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04 , 6109.06
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 5/22/89, 12/31/90, 9/13/93, 4/1/96, 1/1/02, 1/1/03, 11/1/04, 01/01/2008, 01/08/10

3745-81-33 Record maintenance.

Any owner or operator of a public water system subject to the provisions of this chapter shall retain on its premises or at a convenient location near its premises the following records:

(A) Records of microbiological and turbidity analyses made pursuant to this chapter shall be kept for not less than five years unless otherwise specified. Records of chemical analyses made pursuant to this chapter shall be kept for not less than ten years. Actual laboratory reports may be kept, or data may be transferred to tabular summaries, provided that the following information is included:

(1) The date, place, and time of sampling, and the name of the person who collected the sample;

(2) Identification of the sample as to whether it was a routine distribution system sample, check sample, raw or process water sample or other special purpose sample;

(3) Date of analysis;

(4) Laboratory and person responsible for performing analysis;

(5) The analytical technique/method used; and

(6) The results of the analysis.

(B) Records of action taken by the system to correct violations of state primary drinking water rules shall be kept for a period not less than three years after the last action taken with respect to the particular violation involved.

(C) Copies of any written reports, summaries or communications relating to sanitary surveys of the system conducted by the system itself, by a private consultant, or by any local, state or federal agency, shall be kept for a period not less than ten years after completion of the sanitary survey involved.

(D) Copies of public notices issued pursuant to rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code and certifications submitted to the director pursuant to paragraph (A)(3) of rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code must be kept for a minimum of three years after issuance.

(E) Copies of monitoring plans developed by the system or an agent of the system shall be kept for the same period of time as specified in paragraph (A) of this rule.

(F) Copies of any decisions, reports, monitoring plans or certifications developed by the system or an agent of the system to comply with rule 3745-81-22 and paragraphs (C) and (D) of 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code shall be kept for the same period of time as specified in paragraph (A) of this rule.

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/18/2009 and 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/27/78, 01/01/04, 11/1/04

3745-81-40 Requirements for a variance. [Rescinded].

Rescinded eff 11-1-04

3745-81-41 Ground water rule - general requirements and applicability.

Applicability. This rule applies to all public water systems that use ground water except those that combine all of their ground water with surface water or with ground water under the direct influence of surface water prior to treatment under rule 3745-81-71 of the Administrative Code. For the purpose of rules 3745-81-41 to 3745-81-45 of the Administrative Code,"ground water system" is defined as any public water system meeting this applicability statement, including consecutive systems receiving finished ground water.

(A) Systems subject to this rule shall comply with the following requirements:

(1) Sanitary survey information requirements for all ground water systems as described in rule 3745-81-60 of the Administrative Code.

(2) Microbial source water monitoring requirements for ground water systems that do not treat all of their ground water to at least 99.99 per cent (4-log) treatment of viruses (using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer as described in rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code.

(3) Treatment technique requirements, described in rule 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code, that apply to ground water systems that have fecally contaminated source waters as determined by source water monitoring conducted under rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code, or that have significant deficiencies that are identified by the director through the sanitary survey process. A ground water system with fecally contaminated source water or with significant deficiencies subject to the treatment technique requirements of this rule shall implement one or more of the following corrective action options: correct all significant deficiencies; provide an alternate source of water; eliminate the source of contamination; or provide treatment that reliably achieves at least 4-log treatment of viruses (using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer.

(4) Ground water systems that provide at least 4-log treatment of viruses (using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer are required to conduct compliance monitoring to demonstrate treatment effectiveness, as described in rule 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code.

(5) If requested by the director, ground water systems shall provide any existing information that will enable the director to perform a hydrogeologic sensitivity assessment.

Effective: 10/31/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 10/31/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04

3745-81-42 Ground water rule - ground water source microbial monitoring and analytical methods.

(A) Triggered source water monitoring.

(1) A ground water system shall conduct triggered source water monitoring if the conditions identified in paragraphs (A)(1)(a) and (A)(1)(b) of this rule exist.

(a) The system does not provide at least 4-log treatment of viruses (using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer for each ground water source; and

(b) The system is notified that a sample collected under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code is total coliform-positive and the sample is not invalidated in accordance with paragraph (B)(9) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code.

(2) A ground water system shall collect, within twenty-four hours of notification of the total coliform-positive sample, at least one ground water source sample from each ground water source in use at the time the total coliform-positive sample was collected under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code, except as provided in paragraph (A)(2)(b) of this rule. The ground water source sample shall be analyzed for fecal indicators as described in paragraph (C) of this rule.

(a) Upon a request from a public water system, the director may extend the twenty-four hour time limit on a case-by-case basis if the system logistically cannot collect the ground water source samples within twenty-four hours due to circumstances beyond the system's control. When an extension is granted, the director shall specify how much time the system has to collect the ground water source samples.

(b) If acceptable to the director, public water systems with more than one ground water source may meet the requirements of paragraph (A)(2) of this rule by collecting a representative sample(s) from location(s) acceptable to the director. If required, public water systems shall submit a triggered source water monitoring plan acceptable to the director that identifies one or more sampling locations that are representative of each monitoring site in the system's sample siting plan under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code and that the system intends to use for representative sampling under this paragraph.

(c) A noncommunity ground water system serving one thousand people or fewer that has minimal treatment, as defined in rule 3745-81-01 of the Administrative Code, may use a repeat sample to meet both the requirements of paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code and to satisfy the monitoring requirements of paragraph (A)(2) of this rule. If any repeat sample collected from distribution is E. coli positive, the system shall comply with paragraph (A)(3) of this rule.

(3) If the director does not require corrective action in accordance with paragraph (A)(2) of rule 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code for a fecal indicator-positive source water sample collected under paragraph (A)(2) of this rule that is not invalidated under paragraph (D) of this rule, a system shall collect a minimum of five additional source water samples within twenty-four hours of being notified of a fecal indicator-positive sample. At least one sample shall be collected from each well that was in operation at the time of the first positive routine sample. If the system does not have records that indicate which wells were in operation at the time of the first positive routine sample, then samples shall be collected from all active wells in the system. If there are less than five wells in the system, additional samples shall be distributed as evenly as possible between sampled wells to assure that at least five samples are collected.

(4) Consecutive and wholesale systems.

(a) In addition to the other requirements of paragraph (A) of this rule, a consecutive ground water system that has a total coliform-positive sample collected under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code shall notify the wholesale system within twenty-four hours of being notified of the total coliform-positive sample.

(b) In addition to the other requirements of paragraph (A) of this rule, a wholesale ground water system shall comply with paragraphs (A)(4)(b)(i) and (A)(4)(b)(ii) of this rule.

(i) A wholesale ground water system that receives notice from a consecutive system it serves that a sample collected under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code is total coliform-positive shall, within twenty-four hours of being notified, collect a sample from its ground water sources under paragraph (A)(2) of this rule and analyze it for a fecal indicator under paragraph (C) of this rule.

(ii) If the sample collected under paragraph (A)(4)(b)(i) of this rule is fecal indicator-positive, the wholesale ground water system shall notify all consecutive systems served by that ground water source of the fecal indicator source water positive within twenty-four hours of being notified of the ground water source sample monitoring result and shall meet the requirements of paragraph (A)(3) of this rule.

(5) A ground water system is not required to comply with the source water monitoring requirements of paragraph (A) of this rule if either of the following conditions exists:

(a) The director determines, and documents in writing, that the total coliform-positive sample collected under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code is caused by a distribution system deficiency; or

(b) The total coliform-positive sample collected under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code is collected at a location that meets the director's criteria for distribution system conditions that will cause total coliform-positive samples.

(B) Assessment source water monitoring.

If directed, ground water systems shall conduct assessment source water monitoring that meets director-determined requirements for such monitoring. A ground water system conducting assessment source water monitoring may use a triggered source water sample collected under paragraph (A)(2) of this rule to meet the requirements of paragraph (B) of this rule. Director-determined assessment source water monitoring requirements may include:

(1) A hydrogeologic sensitivity assessment in accordance with paragraph (A)(5) of rule 3745-81-41 of the Administrative Code.

(2) Collection of a standard sample volume of at least one hundred milliliters for fecal indicator listed in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code for the presence of E. coli, enterococci, or coliphage.

(3) Collection of ground water source samples in accordance with a sampling schedule determined by the director.

(4) Analysis of all ground water source samples, using one of the analytical methods listed in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code or as determined by the director, for the presence of fecal indicators.

(5) Collection of ground water source samples at a location prior to any treatment of the ground water source unless the director accepts a sampling location after treatment.

(6) Collection of ground water source samples at the well itself unless the system's configuration does not allow for sampling at the well itself and the director accepts an alternate sampling location that is representative of the water quality of that well.

(C) Analytical methods.

(1) A ground water system subject to the source water monitoring requirements of paragraph (A) of this rule shall collect a standard sample volume of at least one hundred milliliters for fecal indicator analysis regardless of the fecal indicator or analytical method used.

(2) A ground water system shall analyze all ground water source samples collected in accordance with paragraph (A) of this rule, using one of the analytical methods listed in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code or as determined by the director, for the presence of E. coli, enterococci, or coliphage.

(D) Invalidation of a fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample.

(1) A ground water system may obtain director invalidation of a fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample collected under paragraph (A) of this rule only under the following conditions:

(a) The system provides the director with written notice from the laboratory that improper sample analysis occurred; or

(b) The director determines, and documents in writing, that there is substantial evidence that a fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample is not related to source water quality.

(2) If the director invalidates a fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample, the ground water system shall collect another source water sample under paragraph (A) of this rule within twenty-four hours of being notified of the sample invalidation and have the source water sample analyzed for the same fecal indicator using the analytical methods in paragraph (C) of this rule. The director may extend the twenty-four hour time limit on a case-by-case basis if the system cannot collect the source water sample within twenty-four hours due to circumstances beyond the system's control. In the case of an extension, the director shall specify how much time the system has to collect the sample.

(E) Sampling location.

(1) Any ground water source sample required under paragraph (A) of this rule shall be collected at a location prior to any treatment of the ground water source unless the director accepts a sampling location after treatment.

(2) If the system's configuration does not allow for sampling at the well itself, the system may collect a sample at a director-accepted location to meet the requirements of paragraph (A) of this rule if the sample is representative of the water quality of that well.

(3) A ground water system with minimal treatment, as defined in rule 3745-81-01 of the Administrative Code, may collect a sample at a location acceptable to the director.

(F) If required by the director, a ground water system that places a new ground water source into service after November 30, 2009, shall conduct assessment source water monitoring under paragraph (B) of this rule. If required by the director, the system shall begin monitoring before the ground water source is used to provide water to the public.

(G) A ground water system with a ground water source sample collected under paragraph (A) or (B) of this rule that is fecal indicator-positive and that is not invalidated under paragraph (D) of this rule, including consecutive systems served by the ground water source, shall conduct public notification in accordance with paragraph (B)(1)(h) of rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code.

(H) Failure to meet the requirements of paragraphs (A) to (F) of this rule is a monitoring violation and requires the ground water system to provide public notification under paragraph (D)(1)(a) of rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code. A ground water system providing 4-log inactivation of viruses and required to conduct assessment source water monitoring in accordance with this rule, and if acceptable to the director, will not be required to issue public notification.

Effective: 10/31/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 10/31/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04

3745-81-43 Ground water rule - treatment technique requirements for ground water systems.

(A) Ground water systems with significant deficiencies or source water fecal contamination.

(1) A ground water system shall comply with the requirements of this rule when a significant deficiency is identified or when a ground water source sample collected in accordance with paragraph (A)(3) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code is fecal indicator-positive.

(2) Unless otherwise specified by the director, a ground water system with a ground water source sample collected under paragraph (A)(2), (A)(4) or (B) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code that is fecal indicator-positive shall comply with the requirements of this rule.

(3) When a significant deficiency is identified at a public water system that uses both ground water and surface water, the system shall comply with provisions of this rule except in cases where the director determines that the significant deficiency is in a portion of the distribution system that is served solely by surface water.

(4) Unless the ground water system is required to implement a specific corrective action, the ground water system shall consult with the director regarding the appropriate corrective action within thirty days of receiving written notice of a significant deficiency, written notice from a laboratory that a ground water source sample collected in accordance with paragraph (A)(3) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code was found to be fecal indicator-positive, or direction from the director that a fecal indicator-positive collected under paragraph (A)(2), (A)(4) or (B) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code requires corrective action. For the purposes of this rule, significant deficiencies include, but are not limited to, defects in design, operation, or maintenance, or a failure or malfunction of the sources, treatment, storage, or distribution system that the director determines to be causing, or have potential for causing, the introduction of contamination into the water delivered to consumers.

(5) Within one hundred twenty days (or earlier if required) of receiving written notification from the director of a significant deficiency, written notice from a laboratory that a ground water source sample collected under paragraph (A)(3) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code was found to be fecal indicator-positive, or written notification from the director that a fecal indicator-positive sample collected under paragraph (A)(2), (A)(4) or (B) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code requires corrective action, the ground water system shall either:

(a) Have completed corrective actions in accordance with all applicable plan review processes or other guidance as acceptable to the director, if any, including director-specified interim measures; or

(b) Be in compliance with a corrective action plan and schedule approved by the director, which are subject to the following conditions:

(i) Any subsequent modifications to an approved corrective action plan and schedule shall also be approved by the director.

(ii) If the director specifies interim measures for protection of the public health pending approval of the corrective action plan and schedule or pending completion of the corrective action plan, the system shall comply with these interim measures as well as with any schedule as specified by the director.

(6) Ground water systems that meet the conditions of paragraph (A)(1) or (A)(2) of this rule shall implement one or more of the following corrective action alternatives:

(a) Correct all significant deficiencies;

(b) Provide an alternate source of water;

(c) Eliminate the source of contamination; or

(d) Provide treatment that reliably achieves at least 4-log treatment of viruses (using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer for the ground water source.

(7) Special notice to the public of significant deficiencies or source water fecal contamination.

(a) In addition to the applicable public notification requirements in paragraph (B)(1)(h) of rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code, a community ground water system that receives notice from the director of a significant deficiency or notification of a fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample that is not invalidated by the director under paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code shall, in accordance with paragraph (F)(8) of rule 3745-96-02 of the Administrative Code, inform the public served by the water system of the fecal indicator-positive source sample or of any significant deficiency that has not been corrected. The system shall continue to inform the public annually until the significant deficiency is corrected or the fecal contamination in the ground water source is determined by the director to be corrected in accordance with paragraph (A)(5) of this rule.

(b) In addition to the applicable public notification requirements in paragraph (B)(1)(h) of rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code, a noncommunity ground water system that receives notice from the director of a significant deficiency shall inform the public served by the water system in a manner acceptable to the director of any significant deficiency that has not been corrected within twelve months of being notified, or earlier if required by the director. The system shall continue to inform the public annually until the significant deficiency is corrected. The information shall include:

(i) The nature of the significant deficiency and the date the significant deficiency was identified;

(ii) The director-approved plan and schedule for correction of the significant deficiency, including interim measures, progress to date, and any interim measures completed; and

(iii) For systems with a large proportion of non-English speaking consumers, defined as ten per cent or more of the residents speaking the same non-English language, information in the appropriate language regarding the importance of the notice or a telephone number or address where consumers may contact the system to obtain a translated copy of the notice or assistance in the appropriate language.

(c) If determined by the director, a noncommunity water system with significant deficiencies that have been corrected shall inform its customers of the significant deficiencies, how the deficiencies were corrected, and the dates of correction in paragraph (A)(7)(b) of this rule.

(B) Compliance monitoring.

(1) A ground water system that is not required to meet the source water monitoring requirements of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code because the system provides at least 4-log treatment of viruses(using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer for the ground water source shall comply with the following requirements:

(a) The system shall notify the director in writing that it provides at least 4-log treatment of viruses (using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer for the ground water source. Notification to the director shall include engineering, operational, or other information that the director requests to evaluate the submission. The notification may also require a complete plan approval application in accordance with Chapter 3745-91 of the Administrative Code.

(b) The system shall obtain acceptance or approval from the director for 4-log treatment of viruses.

(c) The system shall conduct compliance monitoring as required in paragraph (B)(2) of this rule within thirty days of placing the source in service or receiving director approval for 4-log treatment of viruses.

(d) The system shall conduct ground water source monitoring in accordance with rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code if the system subsequently discontinues 4-log treatment of viruses(using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer for the ground water source.

(2) Monitoring requirements. A ground water system subject to the requirements of paragraph (A) or (B)(1) of this rule shall monitor the effectiveness and reliability of treatment for that ground water source before or at the first customer as follows:

(a) Chemical disinfection.

(i) For a system providing disinfection treatment only, the disinfection treatment shall be considered sufficient if the total treatment processes of that public water system would consistently and reliably achieve at least 99.99 per cent (4-log) inactivation of viruses, as determined from tables B-7, B-9, B-11 and B-13 of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code.

(ii) Treatment technique requirements are used to ensure control of viruses in drinking water. Tables B-7, B-9, B-11 and B-13 of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code shall be used to determine the sufficiency of disinfection for this rule.

(iii) The level of disinfection being provided by the system is determined by measuring actual CT values. Actual CT values are obtained by multiplying the residual disinfectant, C, by the disinfection contact time, T, giving the resultant, CT. The value of C in milligrams per liter is determined at a point before or at the first customer. The value of T in minutes is based on the time available for the disinfectant to work from the point at which it is added to the water until the point at which C is measured. Values of T are determined based on the approved effective volume factor of the clearwell or contact tank including T for the conduit before the first customer. It may be appropriate to determine the value of C at more than one point of the water treatment flow, with the T associated with each C being estimated from the previous measurement point or the previous addition of disinfectant, whichever is closer. If more than one disinfectant concentration point is used, the products of each C and its associated T are added and the sum of these products is the actual CT value to compare with the appropriate value of the required minimum CT values for specified conditions and levels of inactivation. Note that any disinfection after the last determination of C is not included in the actual CT value. Minimum required CT values for inactivation of viruses by disinfection in relation to the disinfectant, the extent of inactivation, the lowest disinfectant concentration, the pH, and the water temperature are found in tables B-7, B-9, B-11 and B-13 of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code.

(iv) In tables B-7, B-9, B-11 and B-13 of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code, the required CT between the indicated temperatures, pH or residual disinfectant concentrations may be determined by linear interpolation. If no interpolation is used, then the required CT shall be determined at the lower temperature, and at the higher pH. If no interpolation is used, for virus inactivation at a pH greater than nine, the required CT shall be the same as the required CT at a pH equal to ten.

(v) On each day when the actual CT value meets or exceeds the required minimum CT value in or linearly interpolated from tables B-7, B-9, B-11 and B-13 of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code, then the water treatment plant is considered to be satisfying this rule's treatment technique requirements for disinfection of ground water sources. On each day when the actual CT value does not meet or exceed the required minimum CT value from tables B-7, B-9, B-11 and B-13 of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code, then the water treatment plant is in violation of paragraph (B)(2)(a)(i) of this rule if the CT value is not restored within four hours.

(vi) For each clearwell, or contact tank, the approved effective volume factor shall be determined by the director based upon its design characteristics including: the average flow path length to channel width ratio; baffling; and the proximity of the outlet to the inlet using figures B-1 and B-2 of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code. The approved effective volume factor shall be the preliminary effective volume factor obtained from figure B-1 multiplied by the reduction factor obtained from figure B-2, rounded down to the nearest 0.05. A public water system may request that the director approve an effective volume factor that was determined by tracer studies, hydraulic analysis or modeling, or an equivalent demonstration. For a tracer study to be acceptable, the net advection of the tracer shall be within ten per cent of the change in the tracer chemical storage within the clearwell system. Net advection means the amount of tracer convected out of the clearwell system minus the amount of tracer convected into the clearwell system over the duration of the tracer study.

(vii) Public water systems serving greater than three thousand three hundred people shall continuously monitor the residual disinfectant concentration of the water at a location approved by the director and the lowest value shall be recorded each day. If there is a failure in the continuous disinfectant monitoring equipment, the public water system shall conduct grab sampling every four hours in lieu of continuous monitoring until the continuous monitoring equipment is repaired and returned to service. A public water system has no more than five days after failure of the equipment to repair the continuous monitoring equipment and return it to service.

(viii) Public water systems serving three thousand three hundred or fewer people shall monitor the residual disinfectant concentration at a location approved by the director, and record the residual disinfection concentration each day that water from the ground water source is served to the public. The public water system shall take a daily grab sample during the hour of peak flow or at another time specified by the director. If the actual residual disinfectant concentration value falls below the required minimum specified by the director, the ground water system shall take follow-up samples every four hours until the actual disinfectant residual is restored to the director-determined minimum value. Alternatively, a ground water system that serves three thousand three hundred or fewer people may monitor continuously and meet the requirements of paragraph (B)(2)(a)(vii) of this rule.

(ix) Other parameters necessary to determine the sufficiency of disinfection prior to the first customer shall be measured and recorded.

(b) Membrane filtration. A ground water system that uses membrane filtration to meet the requirements of this subpart shall monitor the membrane filtration process in accordance with all director-specified monitoring requirements and shall operate the membrane filtration in accordance with all director-specified compliance requirements. A ground water system that uses membrane filtration is in compliance with the requirement to achieve at least 4-log removal of viruses when:

(i) The membrane has an absolute molecular weight cut-off or an alternate parameter that describes the exclusion characteristics of the membrane, that can reliably achieve at least 4-log removal of viruses;

(ii) The membrane process is operated in accordance with director-specified compliance requirements; and

(iii) The integrity of the test is intact.

(c) Alternative treatment. A ground water system that uses a director-approved alternative treatment to meet the requirements of this rule by providing at least 4-log treatment of viruses (using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer shall:

(i) Monitor the alternative treatment in accordance with all director-specified monitoring requirements;

(ii) Operate the alternative treatment in accordance with all compliance requirements that the director determines to be necessary to achieve at least 4-log treatment of viruses; and

(C) Discontinuing treatment. A ground water system may discontinue 4-log treatment of viruses (using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer for a ground water source if the director determines and documents in writing that 4-log treatment of viruses is no longer necessary for that ground water source. A system that discontinues 4-log treatment of viruses is subject to the source water monitoring and analytical methods requirements in rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code.

(D) Failure to meet the monitoring requirements of paragraph (B) of this rule is a monitoring violation and requires the ground water system to provide public notification in accordance with rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code.

Effective: 10/31/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 10/31/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04

3745-81-44 Ground water rule - treatment technique violations for ground water systems.

(A) A ground water system with a significant deficiency is in violation of the treatment technique requirement if, within one hundred twenty days (or earlier if required by the director) of receiving written notice from the director of the significant deficiency, the system:

(1) Does not complete corrective action in accordance with any applicable corrective action plan review processes or other guidance and direction, including specified interim actions and measures, as acceptable to the director, or

(2) Is not in compliance with a director-approved corrective action plan and schedule.

(B) Unless the director invalidates a fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample in accordance with paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code, a ground water system is in violation of the treatment technique requirement if, within one hundred twenty days(or earlier if required by the director) of meeting the conditions in paragraph (A)(1) or (A)(2) of rule 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code, the system:

(1) Does not complete corrective action in accordance with any applicable corrective action plan review processes or other guidance and direction, including specified interim measures, as acceptable to the director, or

(2) Is not in compliance with a director-approved corrective action plan and schedule.

(C) A ground water system subject to the requirements in paragraph (B)(2) of rule 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code that fails to maintain at least 4-log treatment of viruses(using inactivation, removal, or a director-approved combination of 4-log virus inactivation and removal) before or at the first customer for a ground water source is in violation of the treatment technique requirement if the failure is not corrected within four hours of determining the system is not maintaining at least 4-log treatment of viruses before or at the first customer.

(D) A ground water system must give public notification in accordance with paragraph (C)(1)(a) of rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code for the treatment technique violations specified in paragraphs (A) to (C) of this rule.

Effective: 10/31/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 10/31/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04

3745-81-45 Ground water rule - reporting and recordkeeping for ground water systems.

(A) Reporting. In addition to the requirements in rule 3745-81-31 of the Administrative Code, a ground water system regulated under rules 3745-81-41 to 3745-81-45 and rule 3745-81-60 of the Administrative Code shall provide the following information to the director:

(1) A ground water system conducting compliance monitoring in paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code shall report monthly to the director the information specified in rule 3745-83-01 of the Administrative Code. These ground water systems shall also notify the director any time the system fails to meet any director-specified requirements including, but not limited to, minimum residual disinfectant concentration, membrane operating criteria or membrane integrity, and alternative treatment operating criteria, if operation in accordance with the criteria or requirements is not restored within four hours. The ground water system shall notify the director as soon as possible, but in no case later than the end of the next business day.

(2) After completing any corrective action under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code, a ground water system shall notify the director within thirty days of completion of the corrective action.

(3) If a ground water system subject to the requirements in paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code does not conduct source water monitoring in accordance with paragraph (A)(5)(b) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code, the system shall provide documentation within thirty days of the total coliform positive sample that the system met appropriate criteria as acceptable to the director.

(B) Recordkeeping. In addition to the requirements in rule 3745-81-33 of the Administrative Code, a ground water system regulated under this rule shall maintain the following records:

(1) Documentation of corrective actions. Documentation shall be kept for a period of not less than ten years.

(2) Documentation of notice to the public as required in paragraph (A)(7) of rule 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code. Documentation shall be kept for a period of not less than three years.

(3) Records of decisions in paragraph (A)(5)(b) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code and records of invalidation of fecal indicator-positive ground water source samples in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code. Documentation shall be kept for a period of not less than five years.

(4) For consecutive systems, documentation of notification to the wholesale system(s) of total coliform positive samples that are not invalidated under rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code. Documentation shall be kept for a period of not less than five years.

(5) For systems, including wholesale systems, that are required to perform compliance monitoring in paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code:

(a) Records of the director-specified minimum disinfectant residual. Documentation shall be kept for a period of not less than ten years.

(b) Records of the lowest daily residual disinfectant concentration and records of the date and duration of any failure to maintain the director-prescribed minimum residual disinfectant concentration for a period of more than four hours. Documentation shall be kept for a period of not less than five years.

(c) Records of compliance requirements for membrane filtration and of parameters specified by the director for appropriate approved alternative treatment and records of the date and duration of any failure to meet the membrane operating, membrane integrity, or alternative treatment operating requirements for more than four hours. Documentation shall be kept for a period of not less than five years.

(C) Each public water system, upon discovering that a waterborne disease outbreak potentially attributable to that public water system has occurred, shall report that occurrence to the director as soon as possible, but no later than by the end of the next business day.

Effective: 10/31/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 10/31/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04

3745-81-46 Alternative treatment techniques. [Rescinded].

Rescinded eff 11-1-04

3745-81-50 Requirements for an exemption. [Rescinded].

Rescinded eff 11-1-04

3745-81-51 Exemption request. [Rescinded].

Rescinded eff 11-1-04

3745-81-52 Consideration of an exemption request. [Rescinded].

Rescinded eff 11-1-04

3745-81-53 Disposition of an exemption request. [Rescinded].

Rescinded eff 11-1-04

3745-81-54 Public hearings on exemption schedules. [Rescinded].

Rescinded eff 11-1-04

3745-81-55 Final schedule. [Rescinded].

Rescinded eff 11-1-04

3745-81-60 Sanitary surveys.

(A) Community water systems must undergo a sanitary survey at least every three years. Noncommunity water systems must undergo a sanitary survey at least every five years. The director shall review the results of each sanitary survey to determine whether the existing monitoring frequency is adequate and what additional measures, if any, the public water system needs to undertake to improve drinking water quality.

(B) In conducting a sanitary survey at a public water system using ground water and having a wellhead protection program approved by the director, information on sources of contamination within the delineated wellhead protection area that was collected in the course of developing and implementing the program should be considered instead of collecting new information, if the information was collected since the last time the public water system was subject to a sanitary survey.

(C) Public water systems are responsible for ensuring that the required sanitary surveys are performed. If requested, public water systems shall provide any existing information that will enable a sanitary survey to be conducted. Sanitary surveys shall be performed in accordance with procedures approved by the director and will include, but not be limited to an evaluation of public water system components including the source; treatment; distribution system; finished water storage; pump, pump facilities, and controls; monitoring, reporting, and data verification; system management and operation; and operator compliance.

(D) A public water system shall respond to the director in writing, within thirty days following receipt of a sanitary survey letter, indicating how and on what schedule the public water system will address any significant deficiencies noted in the survey.

(E) A public water system using a surface water source, in whole or in part, shall correct significant deficiencies identified in the sanitary survey report according to the schedule accepted by the director.

(F) A public water system using a ground water, in whole or in part, shall correct significant deficiencies identified in the sanitary survey report within one hundred twenty days, or earlier if required, of receiving written notification from the director of significant deficiencies.

(G) When a significant deficiency is identified at a public water system that uses both ground water and surface water, the system shall comply with provisions of paragraph (F) of this rule except in cases where the director determines that the significant deficiency is in a portion of the distribution system that is served solely by surface water.

Effective: 10/31/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/16/2010 and 10/31/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/31/90, 01/01/02, 08/03/2004, 01/08/10

3745-81-64 General requirements of the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment (LT2) Rule.

(A) The requirements of rules 3745-81-64 to 3745-81-69 of the Administrative Code are derived from national primary drinking water regulations. This rule establishes or extends treatment technique requirements in lieu of maximum contaminant levels for Cryptosporidium and are in addition to requirements for filtration and disinfection in rules 3745-81-71 to 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code. These rule requirements apply to each public water system using a surface water source, in whole or in part. Wholesale systems must comply with the requirements of these rules based on the population of the largest system in the combined distribution system.

Consecutive systems are not exempt from the requirements of the LT2 rule. However, consecutive systems may receive water that a wholesale system has monitored and treated, if required, to comply with the LT2 rule. In this case, the consecutive system is not required to conduct additional monitoring or install additional treatment on that water under the requirements of the LT2 rule.

(B) Systems subject to this rule shall comply with the following requirements:

(1) Systems shall conduct an initial and a second round of source water monitoring for each plant that treats a surface water source, in whole or in part. This monitoring may include sampling for Cryptosporidium, E. coli, and turbidity as described in rule 3745-81-65 and paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-66 of the Administrative Code, to determine what level, if any, of additional Cryptosporidium treatment that shall be provided.

(2) Systems that plan to make a significant change to their disinfection practice shall develop disinfection profiles and calculate disinfection benchmarks, as described in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code.

(3) Systems shall determine the appropriate Cryptosporidium treatment bin classification as described in paragraphs (A) to (D) of rule 3745-81-67 of theAdministrative Code and provide additional treatment for Cryptosporidium, if required, as described in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-67 of theAdministrative Code. Systems shall implement Cryptosporidium treatment in accordance with the schedule in paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code.

(4) Systems required to provide additional treatment for Cryptosporidium shall implement microbial toolbox options that are designed and operated as described in rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code.

(5) Systems shall comply with the applicable recordkeeping and reporting requirements described in rule 3745-81-69 of the Administrative Code.

(6) Systems shall address significant deficiencies identified in sanitary surveys performed by the Ohio environmental protection agency as required by rule 3745-81-60 of the Administrative Code.

Effective: 01/08/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 01/08/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04

3745-81-65 Source monitoring requirements.

(A) Initial round of source water monitoring.

Systems shall conduct the following monitoring on the schedule in paragraph (C) of this rule unless they meet the monitoring exemption criteria in paragraph (D) of this rule.

(1) Systems serving at least ten thousand people shall sample their source water for Cryptosporidium, E. coli, and turbidity at least monthly for twenty-four months.

(2) Systems serving less than ten thousand people shall sample their source water for E. coli at least once every two weeks for twelve months.

(3) Systems serving less than ten thousand people may avoid E. coli monitoring if the system notifies the director that it will monitor for Cryptosporidium as described in paragraph (A)(4) of this rule. The system shall notify the primacy agency at the time of this requirement, no later than three months prior to the date the system is otherwise required to start E. coli monitoring under paragraph (C) of this rule.

(4) Systems serving less than ten thousand people shall sample their source water for Cryptosporidium at least twice per month for twelve months or at least monthly for twenty-four months if they meet one of the following, based on monitoring conducted under paragraph (A)(2) of this rule:

(a) For systems using lake/reservoir sources, the annual mean E. coli concentration is greater than ten E. coli per one hundred milliliters.

(b) For systems using flowing stream sources, the annual mean E. coli concentration is greater than fifty E. coli per one hundred milliliters.

(c) The system does not conduct E. coli monitoring as described in paragraph (A)(2) of this rule.

(d) Systems using a well designated as surface water in accordance with rule 3745-81-76 of the Administrative Code shall comply with the requirements of paragraph (A)(4) of this rule based on the E. coli level that applies to the nearest surface water body. If no surface water body is nearby, the system shall comply based on the requirements that apply to systems using lake/reservoir sources.

(5) For systems serving less than ten thousand people, the primacy agency at the time of this requirement may accept monitoring for an indicator other than E. coli under paragraph (A)(2) of this rule. The primacy agency also may accept an alternative to the E. coli concentration in paragraph (A)(4) of this rule to trigger Cryptosporidium monitoring. This acceptance by the primacy agency shall be provided to the system in writing and shall include the basis for the primacy agency's determination that the alternative indicator and/or trigger level will provide a more accurate identification of whether a system will exceed the Bin 1 Cryptosporidium level in paragraphs (A) to (D) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code.

(6) Systems may sample more frequently than required under this paragraph if the sampling frequency is evenly spaced throughout the monitoring period.

(B) Second round of source water monitoring.

Systems shall conduct a second round of source water monitoring that meets the requirements for monitoring parameters, frequency, and duration described in paragraph (A) of this rule, unless they meet the monitoring exemption criteria in paragraph (D) of this rule. Systems shall conduct this monitoring in accordance with the schedule in paragraph (C) of this rule.

(C) Monitoring schedule.

Systems shall begin the monitoring required in paragraphs (A) and (B) of this rule no later than the month beginning with the date listed in this table:

Source Water Monitoring Starting Date Tables

Systems that serve...

Shall begin the first round of source water monitoring no later than the month beginning...

And shall begin the second round of source water monitoring no later than the month beginning...

(1) At least 100,000 people.

(i) October 1, 2006.

(ii) April 1, 2015.

(2) From 50,000 to 99,999 people.

(i) April 1, 2007.

(ii) October 1, 2015.

(3) From 10,000 to 49,999 people.

(i) April 1, 2008.

(ii) October 1, 2016.

(4) Less than 10,000 and monitor for E. Coli.

(i) October 1, 2008.

(ii) October 1, 2017.

(5) Less than 10,000 and monitor for Cryptosporidium.*

(i) April 1, 2010.

(ii) April 1, 2019.

* Applies to systems that meet the conditions of paragraph (A)(4) of this rule.

(D) Monitoring avoidance.

(1) Systems are not required to conduct source water monitoring under this rule if the system will provide a total of at least 5.5 -log of treatment for Cryptosporidium, equivalent to meeting the treatment requirements of Bin 4 in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code.

(2) If a system chooses to provide the level of treatment in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule, as applicable, rather than start source water monitoring, the system shall notify the primacy agency at the time of this requirement, in writing no later than the date the system is otherwise required to submit a sampling schedule for monitoring in accordance with paragraph (I) of this rule. Alternatively, a system may choose to stop sampling at any point after it has initiated monitoring if it notifies the primacy agency in writing that it will provide this level of treatment. Systems shall install and operate technologies to provide this level of treatment by the applicable treatment compliance date in paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code. The system shall obtain plan approval of the treatment process scheme which provides at least 5.5 log of treatment. The primacy agency may require additional performance monitoring and reporting.

(E) Plants operating only part of the year.

Systems that operate for only part of the year shall conduct source water monitoring in accordance with this rule with the following modifications:

(1) Systems shall sample their source water only during the months that the plant operates unless the director specifies another monitoring period based on plant operating practices.

(2) Systems with plants that operate less than six months per year and that monitor for Cryptosporidium shall collect at least six Cryptosporidium samples per year during each of two years of monitoring. Samples shall be evenly spaced throughout the period the plant operates.

(F) New sources.

Source water monitoring of new sources shall meet the requirements of this rule unless the system meets the monitoring avoidance requirements of paragraph (D) of this rule. The system shall also meet the bin classification and Cryptosporidium treatment requirements of paragraphs (A) to (E) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code, as applicable, for the new source on a schedule the director approves.

(1) An existing system that begins using a new source of surface water after the system is required to begin monitoring in accordance with paragraph (C) of this rule, shall monitor the new source on a schedule the director approves.

(2) A new system that begins operation using a new source after the monitoring date applicable to the system's size in accordance with paragraph (C) of this rule shall monitor the new source on a schedule the director approves.

(3) The system shall begin a second round of source water monitoring no later than six years following initial bin classification in accordance with paragraphs (A) to (D) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code.

(G) Failure to collect any source water sample required under this rule in accordance with the sampling schedule, sampling location, analytical method, approved laboratory, and reporting requirements of paragraphs (I) to (K) of this rule, paragraphs (H) to (J) of rule 3745-81-27 , rule 3745-89-11 , and paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-66 of the Administrative Code, is a monitoring violation.

(H) Grandfathering monitoring data.

Systems may use (grandfather) monitoring data collection prior to the applicable monitoring start date in paragraph (C) of this rule to meet the initial source water monitoring requirements in paragraph (A) of this rule. Grandfathered data may substitute for an equivalent number of months at the end of the monitoring period. All data submitted under this paragraph shall meet the requirements in paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-66 of the Administrative Code.

(I) Sampling schedules.

(1) Systems required to conduct source water monitoring in accordance with paragraphs (A) to (H) of this rule shall submit a sampling schedule that specifies the calendar dates when the system will collect each required sample.

(a) Systems shall submit sampling schedules no later than three months prior to the applicable date listed in paragraph (C) of this rule for each round of required monitoring.

(b) Systems serving at least ten thousand people shall submit their sampling schedule for the initial round of source water monitoring in accordance with paragraph (A) of this rule to the primacy agency at the time of this requirement electronically. If a system is unable to submit the sampling schedule electronically, the system may use an alternative approach for submitting the sampling schedule that the primacy agency approves.

(c) Systems serving less than ten thousand people shall submit their sampling schedules for the initial round of source water monitoring required by paragraph (A) of this rule to the primacy agency at the time of this requirement.

(d) Systems shall submit sampling schedules for the second round of source water monitoring required by paragraph (B) of this rule to the director.

(e) If the primacy agency at the time of this requirement does not respond to a system regarding its sampling schedule, the system shall sample at the reported schedule.

(2) Systems shall collect samples within two days before or two days after the dates indicated in their sampling schedule (e.g., within a five day period around the schedule date) unless one of the following conditions applies :

(a) If an extreme condition or situation exists that may pose danger to the sample collector, or that cannot be avoided and causes the system to be unable to sample in the scheduled five day period, the system shall sample as close to the scheduled date as is feasible unless the primacy agency at the time of this requirement accepts an alternative sampling date. The system shall submit an explanation for the delayed sampling date to the primacy agency concurrent with the shipment of the sample to the laboratory.

(b) If a system is unable to report a valid analytical result for a scheduled sampling date due to equipment failure, loss of or damage to the sample, failure to comply with the analytical method requirements, including the quality control requirements in paragraphs (H) to (J) of rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, or the failure of an approved laboratory to analyze the sample, then the system shall collect a replacement sample. The system shall collect the replacement sample not later than twenty-one days after receiving information that an analytical result cannot be reported for the scheduled date unless the system demonstrates that collecting a replacement sample within this time frame is not feasible or the director accepts an alternative resampling date. The system shall submit an explanation for the delayed sampling date to the primacy agency at the time of this requirement, concurrent with the shipment of the sample to the laboratory.

(3) Systems that fail to meet the criteria of paragraphs (I)(2)(a) and (I)(2)(b) of this rule for any source water sample required by paragraphs (A) to (H) of this rule shall revise their sampling schedules to add dates for collecting all missed samples. Systems shall submit the revised schedule to the primacy agency at the time of this requirement, for acceptance prior to when the system begins collecting the missed samples.

(J) Sampling locations.

Systems required to conduct source water monitoring by paragraphs (A) to (H) of this rule shall collect samples for each plant that treats a surface water source. Where multiple plants draw water from the same influent, such as the same pipe or intake, the primacy agency at the time of this requirement, may accept one set of monitoring results to be used to satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (A) to (H) of this rule for all plants.

(1) Systems shall collect source water samples prior to chemical treatment, such as coagulants, oxidants and disinfectants, unless the system meets the condition of paragraph (J)(2) of this rule.

(2) The primacy agency at the time of this requirement may accept a system to collect a source water sample after chemical treatment. To grant this acceptance, the primacy agency shall determine that collecting a sample prior to chemical treatment is not feasible for the system and that the chemical treatment is unlikely to have a significant adverse effect on the analysis of the sample.

(3) Systems that recycle filter backwash water shall collect source water samples prior to the point of filter backwash water addition.

(4) Bank filtration.

(a) Systems that receive Cryptosporidium treatment credit for bank filtration in accordance with paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-73 of the Administrative Code, as applicable, shall collect source water samples in the surface water prior to bank filtration.

(b) Systems that do not receive Cryptosporidium treatment credit for bank filtration in accordance with paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-73 of the Administrative Code and that use bank filtration as pretreatment to a filtration plant and do not intend to receive Cryptosporidium treatment credit for bank filtration under paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code shall collect source water samples from the well (e.g., after bank filtration). Use of bank filtration during monitoring shall be consistent with routine operational practice.

(5) Multiple sources.

Systems with plants that use multiple water sources, including multiple surface water sources and blended surface water and ground water sources, shall collect samples as specified in paragraph (J)(5)(a) or (J)(5)(b) of this rule. The use of multiple sources during monitoring shall be consistent with routine operational practice.

(a) If a sampling tap is available where the sources are combined prior to treatment, systems shall collect samples from the tap.

(b) If a sampling tap where the sources are combined prior to treatment is not available, systems shall collect samples at each source near the intake on the same day and shall do either of the following:

(i) Systems may composite samples from each source into one sample prior to analysis. The volume of sample from each source shall be weighted according to the proportion of the source in the total plant flow at the time the sample is collected.

(ii) Systems may analyze samples from each source separately and calculate a weighted average of the analysis results for each sampling date. The weighted average shall be calculated by multiplying the analysis result for each source by the fraction the source contributed to total plant flow at the time the sample was collected and then summing these values.

(K) Additional requirements.

Systems shall submit a description of their sampling location to the primacy agency at the time of this requirement, at the same time as the sampling schedule required by paragraph (I) of this rule. This description shall address the position of the sampling location in relation to the system's water source and treatment processes, including pretreatment, points of chemical treatment, and filter backwash recycle. If the primacy agency does not respond to a system regarding sampling location, the system shall sample at the reported location.

Effective: 10/05/2013
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/16/2013 and 10/05/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 01/08/10

3745-81-66 Source monitoring results and grandfathered data.

(A) Reporting source water monitoring results.

(1) Systems shall report results from the source water monitoring required by paragraphs (A) to (H) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code no later than ten days after the end of the first month following the month when the sample is collected.

(2) All systems serving at least ten thousand people shall report the results from the initial source water monitoring required by paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code to the primacy agency at the time of this requirement electronically. If a system is unable to report monitoring results electronically, the system may use an alternative approach for reporting monitoring results that the primacy agency approves.

(3) Systems serving less than ten thousand people shall report results from the initial source water monitoring required by paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code to the primacy agency at the time of this requirement.

(4) All systems shall report results from the second round of source water monitoring required by paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code to the director.

(5) Systems shall report the following applicable information for the source water monitoring required by paragraphs (A) to (H) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code :

(a) Systems shall report the following information for each Cryptosporidium analysis:

Public water system (PWS) ID;

Source treatment unit (STU) ID;

Sample collection date;

Sample type (field or matrix spike);

Sample volume filtered (L), to nearest 0.25 L;

Was one hundred per cent of filtered volume examined; and Number of oocysts counted.

For matrix spike samples, systems shall also report the sample volume spiked and estimated number of oocysts spiked. These data are not required for field samples.

For samples in which less than ten liters is filtered or less than one hundred per cent of the sample volume is examined, systems shall also report the number of filters used and the packed pellet volume.

For samples in which less than one hundred per cent of sample volume is examined, systems shall also report the volume of re-suspended concentrate and volume of this re-suspension processed through immunomagnetic separation.

(b) Systems shall report the following information for each E. coli analysis:

PWS ID;

STU ID;

Sample collection date;

Analytical method number;

Method type;

Source type (e.g., flowing stream, lake/reservoir, well designated as surface water);

E. coli/one hundred milliliters;

Turbidity. (Systems serving less than ten thousand people that are not required to monitor for turbidity in accordance with paragraphs (A) to (H) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code are not required to report turbidity with their E. coli results.)

(B) Grandfathering previously collected data.

Systems may comply with the initial source water monitoring requirements of paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code by grandfathering sample results collected before the system is required to begin monitoring (i.e., previously collected data). To be grandfathered, the sample results and analysis shall meet the following criteria and shall be accepted by the primacy agency at the time of this requirement :

(1) A system may grandfather Cryptosporidium samples to meet the requirements of paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code when the system does not have corresponding E. coli and turbidity samples. A system that grandfathers Cryptosporidium samples without E. coli and turbidity samples is not required to collect E. coli and turbidity samples when the system completes the requirements for Cryptosporidium monitoring in accordance with paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code.

(2) E. coli sample analysis. The analysis of E. coli samples shall meet the analytical method and approved laboratory requirements of paragraphs (H) to (J) of rule 3745-81-27 and rule 3745-89-11 of the Administrative Code.

(3) Cryptosporidium sample analysis. The analysis of Cryptosporidium samples shall meet the following criteria :

(a) Laboratories analyzed Cryptosporidium samples using one of the following analytical methods :

(i) USEPA method 1623, "Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA" United States environmental protection agency, 2005, EPA-815-R-05-002.

(ii) USEPA method 1622, "Cryptosporidium in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA" United States environmental protection agency, 2005, EPA-815-R-05-001.

(iii) USEPA method 1623, "Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA" United States environmental protection agency, 2001, EPA-821-R-01-025.

(iv) USEPA method 1622, "Cryptosporidium in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA" United States environmental protection agency, 2001, EPA-821-R-01-026.

(v) USEPA method 1623, "Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA" United States environmental protection agency, 1999, EPA-821-R-99-006.

(vi) USEPA method 1622, "Cryptosporidium in Water by Filtration/IMS/FA" United States environmental protection agency, 1999, EPA-821-R-99-001.

(b) For each Cryptosporidium sample, the laboratory analyzed at least ten liters of sample or at least two milliliters of packed pellet or as much volume as could be filtered by two filters that U.S. EPA approved for the methods listed in paragraph (B)(3)(a) of this rule.

(4) Sampling location. The sampling location shall meet the conditions of paragraph (J) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code.

(5) Sampling frequency. Cryptosporidium samples were collected no less frequently than each calendar month on a regular schedule, beginning no earlier than January 1999. Sample collection intervals may vary for the conditions specified in paragraphs (I)(2)(a) and (I)(2)(b) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code if the system provides documentation of the condition when reporting monitoring results.

(a) The primacy agency at the time of this requirement may accept grandfathering of previously collected data where there are time gaps in the sampling frequency if the system conducts additional monitoring the primacy agency specifies to ensure that the data used to comply with the initial source water monitoring requirements of paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code are seasonally representative and unbiased.

(b) Systems may grandfather previously collected data where the sampling frequency within each month varied. If the Cryptosporidium sampling frequency varied, systems shall follow the monthly averaging procedure in paragraph (A)(5) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code, as applicable, when calculating the bin classification for systems.

(6) Reporting monitoring results for grandfathering. Systems that request to grandfather previously collected monitoring results shall report the following information by the applicable dates listed in this paragraph. Systems shall report this information to the primacy agency at the time of this requirement.

(a) Systems shall report that they intend to submit previously collected monitoring results for grandfathering. This report shall specify the number of previously collected results the system will submit, the dates of the first and last sample, and whether a system will conduct additional source water monitoring to meet the requirements of paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code. Systems shall report this information no later than the date the sampling schedule is required by paragraph (I) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code.

(b) No later than two months after the applicable date listed in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code, systems shall report previously collected monitoring results for grandfathering, along with the following associated documentation :

(i) For each sample result, systems shall report the applicable information in paragraph (A) of this rule.

(ii) Systems shall certify that the reported monitoring results include all results the system generated during the time period beginning with the first report result and ending with the final reported result. This applies to samples that were collected from the sampling location specified for source water monitoring in rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code, not spiked, and analyzed using the laboratory's routine process for the analytical methods listed in paragraph (B)(3)(a) of this rule.

(iii) Systems shall certify that the samples were representative of a plant's source water and the source water have not changed. Systems shall report a description of the sampling locations, which shall address the position of the sampling location in relation to the systems water source and treatment processes, including points of chemical addition and filter backwash recycle.

(iv) For Cryptosporidium samples, the laboratory or laboratories that analyzed the samples shall provide a letter certifying that the quality control criteria specified in the methods listed in paragraph (B)(3)(a) of this rule were met for each sample batch associated with the reported results. Alternatively, the laboratory may provide bench sheets and sample examination report forms for each field, matrix spike, "Initial Precision and Recovery (IPR)", "Ongoing Precision and Recovery (OPR)," and method blank sample associated with the reported results.

(7) If the director determines that a previously collected data set submitted for grandfathering was generated during source water conditions that were not normal for the system, such as a drought, the director may determine not to accept the data. Alternatively, the primacy agency may accept the previously collected data if the system reports additional source water monitoring data, as determined by the primacy agency, to ensure that the data set used under paragraphs (A) to (D) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code represents average source water conditions for the system.

(8) If a system submits previously collected data that fully meet the number of samples required for initial source water monitoring in accordance with paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code and some of the data are rejected due to not meeting the requirements of this rule, systems shall conduct additional monitoring to replace rejected data on a schedule the primacy agency at the time of this requirement accepts. Systems are not required to begin this additional monitoring until two months after notification that data have been rejected and additional monitoring is necessary.

[The director of the Federal Register approves incorporation by reference in paragraphs (B)(3)(a)(i) to (B)(3)(a)(vi) of this rule in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 C.F.R. part 51. You may obtain a copy of these methods on-line from the United States environmental protection agency, office of ground water and drinking water, 1301 Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20460 (telephone: 800-426-4791). You may inspect a copy at the "Water Docket in the EPA Docket Center, 101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C.," (telephone: 202-566-2426) or at the National archives and records administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.]

Effective: 10/05/2013
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/16/2013 and 10/05/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 01/08/10

3745-81-67 LT2 bin classification and treatment technique requirements.

(A) Following completion of the initial round of source water monitoring required by paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code, systems shall calculate an initial Cryptosporidium bin concentration for each plant for which monitoring was required. Calculation of the bin concentration shall use the Cryptosporidium results reported under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code and shall use the following procedures.

(1) For systems that collect a total of at least forty-eight samples, the bin concentration is equal to the arithmetic mean of all sample concentrations.

(2) For systems that collect a total of at least twenty-four samples, but not more than 47 samples, the bin concentration is equal to the highest arithmetic mean of all sample concentrations in any twelve consecutive months during which Cryptosporidium samples were collected.

(3) For systems that serve less than ten thousand people and monitor for Cryptosporidium for only one year (i.e., collect twenty-four samples in twelve months), the bin concentration is equal to the arithmetic mean of all sample concentrations.

(4) For systems with plants operating only part of the year that monitor less than twelve months per year in accordance with paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code, the bin concentration is equal to the highest arithmetic mean of all sample concentrations during any year of Cryptosporidium monitoring.

(5) If the monthly Cryptosporidium sampling frequency varies, systems shall first calculate a monthly average for each month of monitoring. Systems shall then use these monthly average concentrations, rather than individual sample concentrations, in the applicable calculation for bin classification in paragraphs (A)(1) to (A)(4) of this rule.

(B) Systems shall determine their initial bin classification from the following table and using the Cryptosporidium bin concentration calculated under paragraphs (A)(1) to (A)(5) of this rule:

Bin Classification Table for Systems

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-67_ph_ff_n_ru_20091229_0812-1.png

Systems shall report their initial bin classification to the director for approval no later than six months after the system is required to complete initial source water monitoring based on the schedule in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code. The bin classification report to the director shall include a summary of source water monitoring data and the calculation procedure used to determine bin classification.

For systems serving less than 100,000 within twelve months after the system is required to complete initial source water monitoring, the system shall submit a general plan to the director indicating the system's plan for complying with any additional Cryptosporidium inactivation and/or removal requirements. Systems serving at least 100,000 people shall submit a general plan by March 1, 2010. The general plan shall include at a minimum, a description of each toolbox option which may be used, and a schedule for submitting any required detail plans and/or protocols/pilot study results for the proposed toolbox option. The general plan shall be prepared and submitted by a professional engineer.

(C) Following completion of the second round of source water monitoring required in accordance with paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code, systems shall recalculate their Cryptosporidium bin concentration using the Cryptosporidium results reported in accordance with paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code and following the procedures in paragraphs (A)(1) to (A)(4) of this rule. Systems shall then re-determine their bin classification using this bin concentration and the table in paragraph (B) of this rule. Systems shall report their bin classification to the director for approval no later than six months after the system is required to complete the second round of source water monitoring based on the schedule in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code. The bin classification report to the director shall include a summary of source water monitoring data and the calculation procedure used to determine bin classification.

Within six months of receiving the director's approval of the bin classification, the system shall submit a general plan to the director indicating the system's plan for complying with any additional Cryptosporidium inactivation and/or removal requirements. The general plan shall include at a minimum, a description of each toolbox option which may be used, and a schedule for submitting any required detail plans and/or protocols/pilot study results for the proposed toolbox option.

(D) Failure to comply with the reporting requirements in paragraphs (B) and (C) of this rule is a violation of the treatment technique requirement.

(E) Additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements based on bin classification.

(1) Systems shall provide the level of additional treatment for Cryptosporidium specified in this paragraph based on their bin classification as determined in accordance with paragraphs (A) to (D) of this rule and according to the schedule in paragraph (F) of this rule.

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(1) As determined by the director sucti ttiat the total Cryptosporidium removal and inactivation is at least 4.0 -log.

(2) As determined by the director such that the total Cryptosporidium removal and inactivation is at least 5.0 -log.

(3) As determined by the director such that the total Cryptosporidium removal and inactivation is at least 5.5 -!og.

(2) Systems shall use one or more of the treatment and management options listed in paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code, termed the microbial toolbox, to comply with the additional Cryptosporidium treatment required in paragraph (E)(1) of this rule.

(3) Systems classified in Bin 3 and Bin 4 shall achieve at least 1-log of the additional Cryptosporidium treatment required under paragraph (E)(1) of this rule using either one or a combination of the following: bag filters, bank filtration, cartridge filters, chlorine dioxide, membranes, ozone, or UV, as described in paragraphs (B) to (N) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code.

(4) Failure by a system in any month to achieve treatment credit by meeting criteria in paragraphs (B) to (N) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code for microbial toolbox options that is at least equal to the level of treatment required in paragraph (E)(1) of this rule is a violation of the treatment technique requirement.

(5) If the director determines during a sanitary survey or an equivalent source water assessment that after a system completed the monitoring conducted in accordance with paragraphs (A) or (B) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code, significant changes occurred in the system's watershed that could lead to increased contamination of the source water by Cryptosporidium, the system shall take actions specified by the director to address the contamination. These actions may include additional source water monitoring and/or implementing microbial toolbox options listed in paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code.

(F) Schedule for compliance with Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

(1) After the initial bin classification is determined, systems shall provide the level of treatment for Cryptosporidium required by paragraph (E) of this rule in accordance with the following schedule:

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-67_ph_ff_n_ru_20091229_0812-3.png

(2) If the bin classification for a system changes following the second round of source water monitoring, as determined in accordance with paragraph (C) of this rule, the system shall provide the level of treatment for Cryptosporidium required in accordance with paragraph (E) of this rule on a schedule the director approves.

Effective: 01/08/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 01/08/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04

3745-81-68 Microbial toolbox options for meeting Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

(A) Water systems shall obtain plan approval by the director for each microbial toolbox option prior to receiving treatment credit for the toolbox option. Systems receive the treatment credits listed in the following table by meeting the conditions for microbial toolbox options described in paragraphs (B) to (N) of this rule. Systems shall apply these treatment credits to meet the treatment required by paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code. The following table summarizes options in the microbial toolbox:

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-68_ph_ff_n_ru_20091229_0812-1.png

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-68_ph_ff_n_ru_20091229_0812-2.png

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-68_ph_ff_n_ru_20091229_0812-3.png

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-68_ph_ff_n_ru_20091229_0812-4.png

(B) Watershed control program.

Systems received 0.5 -log Cryptosporidium treatment credit for implementing a watershed control program that meets the requirements of this paragraph.

(1) Systems that intend to apply for the watershed control program credit shall notify the director of this intent no later than two years prior to the treatment compliance date applicable to the system in paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code.

(2) Systems shall submit to the director a proposed watershed control plan no later than one year before the applicable treatment compliance date in paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code. The director shall approve the watershed control plan for the system to receive watershed control program treatment credit. The watershed control plan shall include the following elements:

(a) Identification of an area of influence outside of which the likelihood of Cryptosporidium or fecal contamination affecting the treatment plant intake is not significant as approved by the director. This is the area to be evaluated in future watershed surveys in accordance with paragraph (B)(4)(b) of this rule. The area of influence shall include, at a minimum:

(i) For systems using inland streams, reservoirs, and lakes, the drinking water source protection area with primary focus on the corridor management zone and any additional areas within the watershed that have been specifically identified by the public water system or the director as possible sources of Cryptosporidium.

(ii) For systems using the Ohio River, the zone of critical concern.

(iii) For systems using Lake Erie, the potential influence zone, where this zone has been delineated.

(b) Identification of both potential and actual sources of Cryptosporidium contamination and an assessment of the relative impact of these sources on the system's source water quality.

(c) An analysis of the effectiveness and feasibility of control measures that could reduce Cryptosporidium loading from sources of contamination to the system's source water.

(d) A statement of goals and specific actions the system will undertake to reduce source water Cryptosporidium levels. The plan shall explain how the actions are expected to contribute to specific goals, identify watershed partners and their roles, identify resource requirements and commitments, and include a schedule for plan implementation with deadlines for completing specific actions identified in the plan.

(3) Systems with existing watershed control programs (i.e., programs in place on January 5, 2006) are eligible to seek this credit. Their watershed control plans shall meet the criteria in paragraph (B)(2) of this rule and shall specify ongoing and future actions that will reduce source water Cryptosporidium levels.

(4) Systems shall complete the following actions to maintain the 0.5 -log credit.

(a) Submit an annual watershed control program status report to the director. The annual watershed control program status report shall describe the system's implementation of the approved plan and assess the adequacy of the plan to meet its goals. It shall explain how the system is addressing any shortcomings in plan implementation, including those previously identified by the director or as the result of the watershed survey conducted under paragraph (B)(4)(b) of this rule. It shall also describe any significant changes that have occurred in the watershed since the last watershed sanitary survey. If a system determines during implementation that making a significant change to its approved watershed control program is necessary, the system shall notify the director prior to making any such changes. If any change is likely to reduce the level of source water protection, the system shall also list in its notification the actions the system will take to mitigate this effect.

(b) Undergo a watershed sanitary survey every three years for community water systems and every five years for non-community water systems and submit the survey report to the director. The survey shall be conducted according to Ohio environmental protection agency guidelines and by persons acceptable to the director.

(i) The watershed sanitary survey shall meet the following criteria: encompass the region identified in the director-approved watershed control plan as the area of influence; assess the implementation of actions to reduce source water Cryptosporidium levels; and identify any significant new sources of Cryptosporidium.

(ii) If the director determines that significant changes may have occurred in the watershed since the previous watershed sanitary survey, systems shall undergo another watershed sanitary survey by a date the director requires, which may be earlier than the regular date in paragraph (B)(4)(b) of this rule.

(c) The system shall make the watershed control plan, annual status reports, and watershed sanitary survey reports available to the public upon request. These documents shall be in a plain language style and include criteria by which to evaluate the success of the program in achieving plan goals. The director may accept systems to withhold from the public portions of the annual status report, watershed control plan, and watershed sanitary survey based on water supply security considerations.

(5) If the director determines that a system is not carrying out the approved watershed control plan, or if conditions change from those approved, the watershed control plan may no longer be approvable. An approvable plan must be submitted to maintain the watershed control program treatment credit.

(C) Alternative source.

(1) A system may conduct source water monitoring that reflects a different intake location (either in the same source or for an alternate source) or a different procedure for the timing or level of withdrawal from the source (alternative source monitoring). If the director approves, a system may determine its bin classification in accordance with paragraphs (A) to (D) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code based on the alternative source monitoring results.

(2) If systems conduct alternative source monitoring in accordance with paragraph (C)(1) of this rule, systems shall also monitor their current plant intake concurrently as described in paragraphs (A) to (H) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code.

(3) Alternative source monitoring under paragraph (C)(1) of this rule shall meet the requirements for source monitoring to determine bin classification, as described in rule 3745-81-65 , paragraphs (H) to (J) of rule 3745-81-27 , rule 3745-89-11 , and paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-66 of the Administrative Code. Systems shall report the alternative source monitoring results to the director, along with supporting information documenting the operating conditions under which the samples were collected.

(4) If a system determines its bin classification in accordance with paragraphs (A) to (D) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code using alternative source monitoring results that reflect a different intake location or a different procedure for managing the timing or level of withdrawal from the source, the system shall relocate the intake or permanently adopt the withdrawal procedure, as applicable, no later than the applicable treatment compliance date in paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code.

(D) Presedimentation.

Systems receive 0.5 -log Cryptosporidium treatment credit for a presedimentation basin during any month the process meets the criteria in this paragraph.

(1) The presedimentation basin shall be in continuous operation and shall treat the entire plant flow taken from a surface water source.

(2) The system shall continuously add a coagulant to the presedimentation basin.

(3) The presedimentation basin shall achieve the performance criteria in paragraph (D)(3)(a) or (D)(3)(b) of this rule.

(a) Demonstrates at least 0.5 -log mean reduction of influent turbidity. This reduction shall be determined using daily turbidity measurements in the presedimentation process influent and effluent and shall be calculated as follows:

log10 (monthly mean of daily influent turbidity) - log^ (monthly mean of daily effluent turbidity).

The daily turbidity measurements shall be taken under normal operating conditions for that day. Presedimentation operations shall not be altered for the sole purpose of influencing sample results.

(b) Complies with director-approved performance criteria that demonstrate at least 0.5 -log mean removal of micron sized particulate material through the presedimentation process.

(E) Two-stage lime softening.

Systems receive an additional 0.5 -log Cryptosporidium treatment credit for a two-stage lime softening plant if chemical addition and hardness precipitation occur in two separate and sequential softening stages prior to filtration. Both softening stages shall treat the entire plant flow taken from a surface water source.

(F) Bank filtration.

Systems receive Cryptosporidium treatment credit for bank filtration that serves as pretreatment to a filtration plant by meeting the criteria in this paragraph. Systems using bank filtration when they begin source water monitoring in accordance with paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code shall collect samples as described in paragraph (J)(4) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code and are not eligible for this credit.

(1) Wells with a ground water flow path of at least twenty-five feet receive 0.5 -log treatment credit; wells with a ground water flow path of at least fifty feet receive 1.0 -log treatment credit. The ground water flow path shall be determined as specified in paragraph (F)(4) of this rule.

(2) Only wells in granular aquifers are eligible for treatment credit. Granular aquifers are those comprised of sand, clay, silt, rock fragments, pebbles or larger particles, and minor cement. A system shall characterize the aquifer at the well site to determine aquifer properties. Systems shall extract a core from the aquifer and demonstrate that in at least ninety per cent of the core length, grains less than 1.0 millimeters in diameter constitute at least ten per cent of the core material.

(3) Only horizontal and vertical wells are eligible for treatment credit.

(4) For vertical wells, the ground water flow path is the measured distance from the edge of the surface water body under high flow conditions (determined by the one hundred year floodplain elevation boundary or by the floodway, as defined in Federal emergency management agency flood hazard maps) to the well screen. For horizontal wells, the ground water flow path is the measured distance from the bed of the river under normal flow conditions to the closest horizontal well lateral screen.

(5) Systems shall monitor each wellhead for turbidity at least once within the first and last hours of bank filtration operation and at least every four hours in between. If monthly average turbidity levels, based on daily maximum values in the well, exceed one NTU, the system shall report this result to the director and conduct an assessment within thirty days to determine the cause of the high turbidity levels in the well. If the director determines that microbial removal has been compromised, the bank filtration credit may no longer be approvable. To maintain the bank filtration treatment credit, the system shall implement corrective actions to remediate the problem and submit approvable plans.

(6) Springs and infiltration galleries are not eligible for treatment credit under paragraph (F) of this rule, but are eligible for credit under paragraph (I) of this rule.

(7) Bank filtration demonstration of performance. The director may approve Cryptosporidium treatment credit for bank filtration based on a demonstration of performance study that meets the criteria in this paragraph. This treatment credit may be greater than 1.0 -log and may be awarded to bank filtration that does not meet the criteria in paragraphs (F)(1) to (F)(5) of this rule.

(a) The study shall follow a protocol acceptable to the director and shall involve the collection of data on the removal of Cryptosporidium or a surrogate for Cryptosporidium and related hydrogeologic and water quality parameters during the full range of operating conditions.

(b) The study shall include sampling both from the production well(s) and from monitoring wells that are screened and located along the shortest flow path between the surface water source and the production well(s).

(G) Combined filter performance.

Systems using conventional filtration treatment or direct filtration treatment receive an additional 0.5 -log Cryptosporidium treatment credit during any month the system meets the criteria in this paragraph. Combined filter effluent (CFE) turbidity shall be less than or equal to 0.15 NTU in at least ninety-five per cent of the measurements. Turbidity shall be measured as described in paragraph (C)(3) of rule 3745-81-27 and paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-74 of the Administrative Code.

(H) Individual filter performance.

Systems using conventional filtration treatment or direct filtration treatment receive 0.5 -log Cryptosporidium treatment credit, which can be in addition to the 0.5 -log credit under paragraph (G) of this rule, during any month the system meets the criteria in this paragraph. Compliance with these criteria shall be based on individual filter turbidity monitoring as described in paragraphs (B) and (C) of rule 3745-81-74 of the Administrative Code, as applicable.

(1) The filtered water turbidity for each individual filter shall be less than or equal to 0.15 NTU in at least ninety-five per cent of the measurements recorded each month.

(2) No individual filter may have a measured turbidity greater than 0.3 NTU in two consecutive measurements taken fifteen minutes apart.

(3) Any system that has received treatment credit for individual filter performance and fails to meet the requirements of paragraph (H)(1) or (H)(2) of this rule during any month does not receive a treatment technique violation under paragraph (E)(4) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code if the director determines the following:

(a) The failure was due to unusual and short-term circumstances that could not reasonably be prevented through optimizing treatment plant design, operation, and maintenance.

(b) The system has experienced no more than two such failures in any calendar year.

(I) Demonstration of performance.

The director may approve Cryptosporidium treatment credit for drinking water treatment processes based on a demonstration of performance study that meets the criteria in this paragraph. This treatment credit may be greater than or less than the prescribed treatment credits in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code or paragraphs (D) to (N) of this rule and may be awarded to treatment processes that do not meet the criteria for the prescribed credits.

(1) Systems cannot receive the prescribed treatment credit for any toolbox option in paragraphs (D) to (N) of this rule if that toolbox option is included in a demonstration of performance study for which treatment credit is awarded under this paragraph.

(2) The demonstration of performance study shall follow a protocol acceptable to the director and shall demonstrate the level of Cryptosporidium reduction the treatment process will achieve under the full range of expected operating conditions for the system.

(3) Approval by the director shall be in writing and may include monitoring and treatment performance criteria that the system shall demonstrate and report on an ongoing basis to remain eligible for the treatment credit. The director may designate such criteria where necessary to verify that the conditions under which the demonstration of performance credit was approved are maintained during routine operation.

(J) Bag and cartridge filters.

Systems receive Cryptosporidium treatment credit of up to 2.0 -log for individual bag or cartridge filters and up to 2.5 -log for bag or cartridge filters operated in series by meeting the criteria in paragraphs (J)(1) to (J)(10) of this rule. To be eligible for this credit, systems shall report the results of challenge testing that meets the requirements of paragraphs (J)(2) to (J)(9) of this rule to the director. The filters shall treat the entire plant flow taken from a surface water source.

(1) The Cryptosporidium treatment credit awarded to bag or cartridge filters shall be based on the removal efficiency demonstrated during challenge testing that is conducted according to the criteria in paragraphs (J)(2) to (J)(9) of this rule. A factor of safety equal to 1-log for individual bag or cartridge filters and 0.5 -log for bag or cartridge filters in series shall be applied to challenge testing results to determine removal credit. Systems may use results from challenge testing conducted prior to January 5, 2006 if the prior testing was consistent with the criteria specified in paragraphs (J)(2) to (J)(9) of this rule.

(2) Challenge testing shall be performed on full-scale bag or cartridge filters, and the associated filter housing or pressure vessel, that are identical in material and construction to the filters and housings the system will use for removal of Cryptosporidium. Bag or cartridge filters shall be challenge tested in the same configuration that the system will use, either as individual filters or as a series configuration of filters.

(3) Challenge testing shall be conducted using Cryptosporidium or a surrogate that is removed no more efficiently than Cryptosporidium. The microorganism or surrogate used during challenge testing is referred to as the challenge particulate. The concentration of the challenge particulate shall be determined using a method capable of discretely quantifying the specific microorganism or surrogate used in the test; gross measurements such as turbidity may not be used.

(4) The maximum feed water concentration that can be used during a challenge test shall be based on the detection limit of the challenge particulate in the filtrate (i.e., filtrate detection limit) and shall be calculated using the following equation:

Maximum Feed Concentration = 1 x 10 4x (filtrate detection limit)

(5) Challenge testing shall be conducted at the maximum design flow rate for the filter as specified by the manufacturer.

(6) Each filter evaluated shall be tested for the duration sufficient to reach one hundred per cent of the terminal pressure drop, which establishes the maximum pressure drop under which the filter may be used to comply with the requirements in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code.

(7) Removal efficiency of a filter shall be determined from the results of the challenge test and expressed in terms of log removal values using the following equation:

LRV = LOG10(Cf) - LOG10(Cp)

Where: LRV = log removal value demonstrated during challenge testing; Cf = the feed concentration measured during the challenge test; and Cp = the filtrate concentration measured during the challenge test. In applying this equation, the same units shall be used for the feed and filtrate concentrations. If the challenge particulate is not detected in the filtrate, then the term Cp shall be set equal to the detection limit.

(8) Each filter tested shall be challenged with the challenge particulate during three periods over the filtration cycle: within two hours of start-up of a new filter; when the pressure drop is between forty-five and fifty-five per cent of the terminal pressure drop; and at the end of the cycle after the pressure drop has reached one hundred per cent of the terminal pressure drop. An LRV shall be calculated for each of these challenge periods for each filter tested. The LRV for the filter (LRVfilter) shall be assigned the value of the minimum LRV observed during the three challenge periods for that filter.

(9) If fewer than twenty filters are tested, the overall removal efficiency for the filter product line shall be set equal to the lowest LRVfilter among the filters tested. If twenty or more filters are tested, the overall removal efficiency for the filter product line shall be set equal to the tenth percentile of the set of LRVfilter values for the various filters tested. The percentile is defined by (i/(n+1)) where "i" is the rank of "n" individual data points ordered lowest to highest. If necessary, the tenth percentile may be calculated using linear interpolation.

(10) If a previously tested filter is modified in a manner that could change the removal efficiency of the filter product line, challenge testing to demonstrate the removal efficiency of the modified filter shall be conducted and submitted to the director.

(K) Membrane filtration.

(1) Systems receive Cryptosporidium treatment credit for membrane filtration that meets the criteria of this paragraph. Membrane cartridge filters that meet the definition of membrane filtration in rule 3745-81-01 of the Administrative Code are eligible for this credit. The level of treatment credit a system receives is equal to the lower of the values determined under paragraphs (K)(1)(a) and (K)(1)(b) of this rule. The U.S. EPA"Membrane Guidance Manual for the Final Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule" (November 2005), shall be used as a guide in the technical review of plans submitted for approval of membrane facilities. Approval of plans for membrane facilities may be conditioned upon requirements that may be necessary or desirable to ensure that the system being constructed, or of which the proposed project is a part, will be able to meet generally accepted standards for the design, equipping and operation of membrane facilities. Systems shall keep daily operational logs used to determine monthly compliance with the direct and indirect integrity testing requirements. The operational logs must be signed by an operator of record and kept on a form acceptable to the director. Operational logs must be made available for review upon request.

(a) The removal efficiency demonstrated during challenge testing conducted under the conditions in paragraph (K)(2) of this rule.

(b) The maximum removal efficiency that can be verified through direct integrity testing used with the membrane filtration process under the conditions in paragraph (K)(3) of this rule.

(2) Challenge testing.

The membrane used by the system shall undergo challenge testing to evaluate removal efficiency, and the system shall report the results of challenge testing to the director. Challenge testing shall be conducted according to the criteria in paragraphs (K)(2)(a) to (K)(2)(g) of this rule. Systems may use data from challenge testing conducted prior to January 5, 2006 if the prior testing was consistent with the criteria in paragraphs (K)(2)(a) to (K)(2)(g) of this rule.

(a) Challenge testing shall be conducted on either a full-scale membrane module, identical in material and construction to the membrane modules used in the system's treatment facility, or a smaller-scale membrane module, identical in material and similar in construction to the full-scale module. A module is defined as the smallest component of a membrane unit in which a specific membrane surface area is housed in a device with a filtrate outlet structure.

(b) Challenge testing shall be conducted using Cryptosporidium oocysts or a surrogate that is removed no more efficiently than Cryptosporidium oocysts. The organism or surrogate used during challenge testing is referred to as the challenge particulate. The concentration of the challenge particulate, in both the feed and filtrate water, shall be determined using a method capable of discretely quantifying the specific challenge particulate used in the test; gross measurements such as turbidity may not be used.

(c) The maximum feed water concentration that can be used during a challenge test is based on the detection limit of the challenge particulate in the filtrate and shall be determined according to the following equation:

Maximum Feed Concentration = 3.16 x 106 x (Filtrate Detection Limit)

(d) Challenge testing shall be conducted under representative hydraulic conditions at the maximum design flux and maximum design process recovery specified by the manufacturer for the membrane module. Flux is defined as the throughput of a pressure driven membrane process expressed as flow per unit of membrane area. Recovery is defined as the volumetric per cent of feed water that is converted to filtrate over the course of an operating cycle uninterrupted by events such as chemical cleaning or a solids removal process (e.g., backwashing).

(e) Removal efficiency of a membrane module shall be calculated from the challenge test results and expressed as a log removal value according to the following equation:

LRV = LOG10(Cf) - LOG10(Cp)

Where:

LRV = log removal value demonstrated during the challenge test; Cf = the feed concentration measured during the challenge test; and Cp = the filtrate concentration measured during the challenge test.

Equivalent units shall be used for the feed and filtrate concentrations. If the challenge particulate is not detected in the filtrate, the term Cp is set equal to the detection limit for the purpose of calculating the LRV. An LRV shall be calculated for each membrane module evaluated during the challenge test.

(f) The removal efficiency of a membrane filtration process demonstrated during challenge testing shall be expressed as a log removal value (LRV CTest).If fewer than twenty modules are tested, then LRVC-Testis equal to the lowest of the representative LRVs among the modules tested. If twenty or more modules are tested, then LRVC-Test. is equal to the tenth percentile of the representative LRVs among the modules tested. The percentile is defined by (i/(n+1)) where "i" is the rank of "n" individual data points ordered lowest to highest. If necessary, the tenth percentile may be calculated using linear interpolation.

(g) The challenge test shall establish a quality control release value (QCRV) for a non-destructive performance test that demonstrates the Cryptosporidium removal capability of the membrane filtration module. This performance test shall be applied to each production membrane module used by the system that was not directly challenge tested in order to verify Cryptosporidium removal capability. Production modules that do not meet the established QCRV are not eligible for the treatment credit demonstrated during the challenge test.

(h) If a previously tested membrane is modified in a manner that could change the removal efficiency of the membrane or the applicability of the nondestructive performance test and associated QCRV, additional challenge testing to demonstrate the removal efficiency of, and determine a new QCRV for, the modified membrane shall be conducted and submitted to the director.

(3) Direct integrity testing.

Systems shall conduct direct integrity testing in a manner that demonstrates a removal efficiency equal to or greater than the removal credit awarded to the membrane filtration process and meets the requirements described in paragraphs (K)(3)(a) to (K)(3)(f) of this rule. A direct integrity test is defined as a physical test applied to a membrane unit in order to identify and isolate integrity breaches (e.g., one or more leaks that could result in contamination of the filtrate).

(a) The direct integrity test shall be independently applied to each membrane unit in service. A membrane unit is defined as a group of membrane modules that share common valving that allows the unit to be isolated from the rest of the system for the purpose of integrity testing or other maintenance.

(b) The direct integrity method shall have a resolution of three micrometers or less, where resolution is defined as the size of the smallest integrity breach that contributes to a response from the direct integrity test.

(c) The direct integrity test shall have the sensitivity sufficient to verify the log treatment credit approved by the director for the membrane filtration process, where sensitivity is defined as the maximum log removal value that can be reliably verified by a direct integrity test. Sensitivity shall be determined using the approach in either paragraph (K)(3)(c)(i) or (K)(3)(c)(ii) of this rule as applicable to the type of direct integrity test the system uses.

(i) For direct integrity tests that use an applied pressure or vacuum, the direct integrity test sensitivity shall be calculated according to the following equation:

LRVDIT = LOG10 (Qp /(VCF x Qbreach))

Where:

LRVDIT = the sensitivity of the direct integrity test; Qp = total design filtrate flow from the membrane unit; Qbreach= flow of water from an integrity breach associated with the smallest integrity test response that can be reliably measured; and VCF = volumetric concentration factor. The volumetric concentration factor is the ratio of the suspended solids concentration on the high pressure side of the membrane relative to that in the feed water.

(ii) For direct integrity tests that use a particulate or molecular marker, the direct integrity test sensitivity shall be calculated according to the following equation:

LRVDIT = LOG10(Cf) - LOG10(Cp)

Where:

LRV DIT= the sensitivity of the direct integrity test; Cf = the typical feed concentration of the marker used in the test; and Cp = the filtrate concentration of the marker from an integral membrane unit.

(d) Systems shall establish a control limit within the sensitivity limits of the direct integrity test that is indicative of an integral membrane unit capable of meeting the removal credit approved by the director.

(e) If the result of a direct integrity test exceeds the control limit established under paragraph (K)(3)(d) of this rule, the system shall remove the membrane unit from service. Systems shall conduct a direct integrity test to verify any repairs, and may return the membrane unit to service only if the direct integrity test is within the established control limit.

(f) Systems shall conduct direct integrity testing on each membrane unit at a frequency of not less than once each day that the membrane unit is in operation. The director may approve less frequent testing, based on demonstrated process reliability, the use of multiple barriers effective for Cryptosporidium, or reliable process safeguards.

(4) Indirect integrity monitoring.

Systems shall conduct continuous indirect integrity monitoring on each membrane unit according to the criteria in paragraphs (K)(4)(a) to (K)(4)(f) of this rule. Indirect integrity monitoring is defined as monitoring some aspect of filtrate water quality that is indicative of the removal of particulate matter. A system that implements continuous direct integrity testing of membrane units in accordance with the criteria in paragraphs (K)(3)(a) to (K)(3)(f) of this rule is not subj ect to the requirements for continuous indirect integrity monitoring. Systems shall submit a monthly report to the director summarizing all continuous indirect integrity monitoring results triggering direct integrity testing and the corrective action that was taken in each case.

(a) Unless the director approves an alternative parameter, continuous indirect integrity monitoring shall include continuous filtrate turbidity monitoring.

(b) Continuous monitoring shall be conducted at a frequency of no less than once every fifteen minutes.

(c) Continuous monitoring shall be separately conducted on each membrane unit.

(d) If indirect integrity monitoring includes turbidity and if the filtrate turbidity readings are above 0.15 NTU for a period greater than fifteen minutes (i.e., two consecutive fifteen-minute readings above 0.15 NTU), direct integrity testing shall immediately be performed on the associated membrane unit as specified in paragraphs (K)(3)(a) to (K)(3)(f) of this rule.

(e) The public water system shall validate the continuous measurement for accuracy on a regular basis using a protocol acceptable to the director.

(f) If indirect integrity monitoring includes a director-approved alternative parameter and if the alternative parameter exceeds a director-approved control limit for a period greater than fifteen minutes, direct integrity testing shall immediately be performed on the associated membrane units as specified in paragraphs (K)(3)(a) to (K)(3)(f) of this rule.

(L) Second stage filtration.

Systems receive 0.5 -log Cryptosporidium treatment credit for a separate second stage of filtration that consists of sand, dual media, GAC, or other fine grain media following granular media filtration if the director approves. To be eligible for this credit, the first stage of filtration shall be preceded by a coagulation step and both filtration stages shall treat the entire plant flow taken from a surface water source. A cap, such as GAC, on a single stage of filtration is not eligible for this credit. The director shall approve the treatment credit based on an assessment of the design characteristics of the filtration process.

(M) Slow sand filtration (as secondary filter).

Systems are eligible to receive 2.5 -log Cryptosporidium treatment credit for a slow sand filtration process that follows a separate stage of filtration if both filtration stages treat entire plant flow taken from a surface water source and no disinfectant residual is present in the influent water to the slow sand filtration process. The director shall approve the treatment credit based on an assessment of the design characteristics of the filtration process. This paragraph does not apply to treatment credit awarded to slow sand filtration used as a primary filtration process.

(N) Inactivation toolbox components.

(1) Calculation of CT values.

(a) CT is the product of the disinfectant contact time ("T", in minutes) and disinfectant concentration ("C", in milligrams per liter). Systems with treatment credit for chlorine dioxide or ozone under paragraph (N)(2) or (N)(3) of this rule shall calculate CT at least once each day, with both "C" and "T" measured during peak hourly flow as specified in rules 3745-81-27 and 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code.

(b) Systems with several disinfection segments in sequence may calculate CT for each segment, where a disinfection segment is defined as a treatment unit process with a measurable disinfectant residual level and a liquid volume. Under this approach, systems shall add the Cryptosporidium CT values in each segment to determine the total CT for the treatment plant.

(2) CT values for chlorine dioxide and ozone.

(a) Systems receive the Cryptosporidium treatment credit listed in this table by meeting the corresponding chlorine dioxide CT value for the applicable water temperature, as described in paragraph (N)(1) of this rule.

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(b) Systems receive the Cryptosporidium treatment credit listed in this table by meeting the corresponding ozone CT values for the applicable water temperature, as described in paragraph (N)(1) of this rule.

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(3) Site-specific study.

The director may approve alternative chlorine dioxide or ozone CT values to those listed in paragraph (N)(2) of this rule on a site-specific basis. The director shall base this approval on a site-specific study a system conducts that follows a protocol acceptable to the director.

(4) Ultraviolet light. Systems receive Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, and virus treatment credits for ultraviolet (UV) light reactors by achieving the corresponding UV dose values shown in paragraph (N)(4)(a) of this rule. Systems shall validate and monitor UV reactors as described in paragraphs (N)(4)(b) and (N)(4)(c) of this rule to demonstrate that they are achieving a particular UV dose value for treatment credit. The U.S. EPA "Ultraviolet Disinfection Guidance Manual for the Final Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule" (November 2006), shall be used as a guide in the technical review of plans submitted for approval of UV facilities. Approval of plans for UV facilities may be conditioned upon requirements that may be necessary or desirable to ensure that the system being constructed, or of which the proposed project is a part, will be able to meet generally accepted standards for the design, equipping and operation of UV facilities. Systems shall keep daily operational logs used to determine monthly compliance with the percentage of water treated under validated conditions. The operational logs must be signed by an operator of record and kept on a form acceptable to the director. Operational logs must be made available for review upon request.

(a) UV dose table.

The treatment credits listed in this table are for UV light at a wavelength of two hundred fifty-four nanometers as produced by a low pressure mercury vapor lamp. To receive treatment credit for other lamp types, systems shall demonstrate an equivalent germicidal dose through reactor validation testing, as described in paragraph (N)(4)(b) of this rule. The UV dose values in this table are applicable only to post-filter applications of UV.

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(b) Reactor validation testing.

Systems shall use UV reactors that have undergone validation testing to determine the operating conditions under which the reactor delivers the UV dose required in paragraph (N)(4)(a) of this rule (i.e., validated operating conditions). These operating conditions shall include flow rate, UV intensity as measured by a UV sensor, and UV lamp status.

(i) When determining validated operating conditions, systems shall account for the following factors: UV absorbance of the water; lamp fouling and aging; measurement uncertainty of on-line sensors; UV dose distributions arising from the velocity profiles through the reactor; failure of UV lamps or other critical system components; and inlet and outlet piping or channel configurations of the UV reactor.

(ii) Validation testing shall include the following: Full scale testing of a reactor that conforms uniformly to the UV reactors used by the system and inactivation of a test microorganism whose dose response characteristics have been quantified with a low pressure mercury vapor lamp.

(iii) The director may approve an alternative approach to validation testing.

(c) Reactor monitoring.

(i) Systems shall monitor their UV reactors to determine if the reactors are operating within validated conditions, as determined under paragraph (N)(4)(b) of this rule. This monitoring shall include UV intensity as measured by a UV sensor, flow rate, lamp status, and other parameters the director designates based on UV reactor operation. Systems shall verify the calibration of UV sensors and shall recalibrate sensors at least monthly in accordance with a protocol the director accepts. The following parameters shall be monitored and recorded at the frequencies indicated in the table below for each UV reactor:

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(ii) To receive treatment credit for UV light, systems shall treat at least ninety-five per cent of the water delivered to the public during each month by UV reactors operating within validated conditions for the required UV dose, as described in paragraphs (N)(4)(a) and (N)(4)(b) of this rule. Systems shall demonstrate compliance with this condition by the monitoring required under paragraph (N)(4)(c)(i) of this rule.

[This rule references the U.S. EPA "Membrane Guidance Manual for the Final Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule," issued November 2005. This document is available from the "U.S. EPA Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20460-0003, (202) 564-3750". A copy may also be obtained from www.epa.gov/safewater/disinfection/lt2/compliance.html.]

[This rule references the U.S. EPA "Ultraviolet Disinfection Guidance Manual for Final Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule," issued November 2006. This document is available from the "U.S. EPA Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20460-0003, (202) 564-3750". A copy may also be obtained from www.epa.gov/safewater/disinfection/lt2/compliance.html.]

Effective: 01/08/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 01/08/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04

3745-81-69 Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements for LT2 only.

(A) Reporting requirements.

(1) Systems shall report sampling schedules in accordance with paragraph (I) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code and source water monitoring results in accordance with paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-66 of the Administrative Code unless they notify the director that they will not conduct source water monitoring due to meeting the criteria of paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code.

(2) Systems shall report their Cryptosporidium bin classification as described in paragraphs (A) to (D) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code.

(3) Systems shall report disinfection profiles and benchmarks to the director as described in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code prior to making a significant change in disinfection practice.

(4) Systems shall report to the director in accordance with the following table for any microbial toolbox options used to comply with treatment requirements in accordance with paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code. Alternatively, the director may approve a system to certify operation within required parameters for treatment credit rather than reporting monthly operational data for toolbox options.

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(B) Recordkeeping requirements.

(1) Systems shall keep results from the initial round of source water monitoring in accordance with paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code and the second round of source water monitoring in accordance with paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code until three years after bin classification in accordance with paragraphs (A) to (D) of rule 3745-81-67fortheparticularround of monitoring.

(2) Systems shall keep any notification to the director that they will not conduct source water monitoring due to meeting the criteria of paragraph (D) of rule 374581-65 of the Administrative Code for three years.

(3) Systems shall keep the results of treatment monitoring associated with microbial toolbox options in accordance with paragraphs (B) to (N) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code, as applicable, for three years.

Effective: 01/08/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 01/08/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04

3745-81-70 Monitoring requirements for disinfectant residuals.

(A) Each public water system required to monitor under this rule shall develop and implement a monitoring plan. The public water system shall maintain the plan and make it available for inspection by the director and the general public. All surface water systems serving more than three thousand three hundred people shall submit a copy of the monitoring plan to the director no later than the date of the first report required by paragraph (H) of rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code. The director may also require any other public water system to submit such a plan. After review, the director may require changes in any plan elements. The public water system shall modify the plan as required by the director. The plan shall include at least the specific locations and schedules for collecting samples for any parameters included in this rule, and the plan shall include how the public water system will calculate compliance with MRDLs. If a public water system is approved for monitoring as a consecutive system, or provides water to a consecutive system, under the provisions of rule 3745-81-29 of the Administrative Code, its sampling plan shall reflect the entire distribution system. Failure to monitor according to the monitoring plan is a monitoring violation.

(B) Public water systems shall take all disinfectant residual samples during normal operating conditions.

(C) Failure to perform the required monitoring for total chlorine is a monitoring violation. The public water system will be in violation for the entire period covered by the running annual average.

(D) All samples taken and analyzed under the provisions of this rule shall be included in determining compliance, even if that number is greater than the minimum required.

(E) This paragraph applies to community and nontransient noncommunity public water systems that treat their water with chlorine and/or chloramines. The monitoring requirements for total chlorine are as follows:

(1) Residual disinfectant level shall be measured at the same points in the distribution system and at the same time as total coliforms are sampled. However, surface water systems may use the results of residual disinfectant concentration sampling conducted under rule 3745-81-74 of the Administrative Code in lieu of taking separate samples.

(2) Compliance shall be based on a running annual arithmetic average, computed quarterly, of monthly averages of all samples collected by the system under this rule. For total chlorine a public water system is in compliance with the maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) when the running annual average of samples taken in the distribution system, computed quarterly, is less than or equal to the MRDL. If the average of the quarterly averages covering any consecutive four-quarter period exceeds the MRDL, the system is in violation of the MRDL and must notify the public according to rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code, in addition to reporting to the director according to rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code.

(F) This paragraph applies to all public water systems that treat their water with chlorine dioxide. The monitoring requirements for chlorine dioxide are as follows:

(1) Chlorine dioxide levels shall be measured daily in samples taken at the entrance to the distribution system.

(2) Compliance shall be based on consecutive daily samples. A public water system is in compliance with the MRDL when daily samples are taken at the entrance to the distribution system and no two consecutive daily samples exceed the MRDL. If any daily sample exceeds the MRDL, the public water system shall take three chlorine dioxide distribution system samples on the following day. These three samples are in addition to the sample required at the entrance to the distribution system.

(a) If chlorine dioxide or chloramines are used to maintain a disinfectant residual in the distribution system, or if chlorine is used to maintain a disinfectant residual in the distribution system and there are no disinfection addition points after the entrance to the distribution system (i.e., no booster chlorination), the public water system shall take the three samples as close to the first customer as possible, at intervals of at least six hours.

(b) If chlorine is used to maintain a disinfectant residual in the distribution system and there is at least one disinfection addition point after the entrance to the distribution system (i.e., booster chlorination), the public water system shall take one sample at each of the following locations: close to the first customer, in a location representative of average residence time and at a location reflecting maximum residence time in the distribution system.

(c) If any daily sample taken at the entrance to the distribution system exceeds the MRDL, and on the following day one or more of the three samples taken in the distribution system exceed the MRDL, the public water system is in violation of the MRDL. The public water system shall take immediate corrective action to lower the level of chlorine dioxide below the MRDL, and shall notify the public according to the procedures for acute health risks in rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code in addition to reporting to the director according to rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code.

(d) If any two consecutive daily samples taken at the entrance to the distribution system exceed the MRDL and all distribution system samples taken are below the MRDL, the public water system is in violation of the MRDL. The public water system shall take corrective action to lower the level of chlorine dioxide below the MRDL at the point of sampling and shall notify the public according to the procedures for nonacute health risks in rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code in addition to reporting to the director according to rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code.

(3) Failure to monitor at the entrance to the distribution system the day following an exceedance of the chlorine dioxide MRDL at the entrance to the distribution system is also an MRDL violation. The public water system shall notify the public of the violation according to the provisions for nonacute violations in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code.

(4) Failure to monitor in the distribution system the day following an exceedance of the chlorine dioxide MRDL at the entrance to the distribution system is also an MRDL violation and the system must notify the public of the violation according to the provisions for acute violations under paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code.

(G) Notwithstanding the MRDLs in rule 3745-81-10 of the Administrative Code, public water systems may increase residual disinfectant levels of chlorine or chloramines(but not chlorine dioxide) in the distribution system to a level and for a time necessary to protect public health, to address specific microbiological contamination problems caused by circumstances such as, but not limited to, distribution line breaks, storm run-off events, source water contamination events, or cross-connections events.

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/18/2009 and 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 01/01/02, 01/01/04

3745-81-71 General requirements for filtration and disinfection of surface water sources.

(A) Rules 3745-81-71 to 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code are derived from national primary drinking water regulations. The treatment technique requirements of this rule are established in lieu of maximum contaminant levels for the following contaminants: Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, viruses, heterotrophic plate count bacteria, Legionella, and turbidity. Each public water system using a surface water source, in whole or in part, shall provide treatment of that source water which complies with the treatment technique requirements of this rule. The treatment technique requirements consist of installing and properly operating water treatment processes which consistently and reliably achieve the following:

(1) At least 99.9 per cent (3 log) removal and/or inactivation of Giardia lamblia cysts between a point where the raw water is not subject to recontamination by surface water runoff and a later point before or at the first customer .

(2) At least 99.99 per cent (4 log) removal and/or inactivation of viruses between a point where the raw water is not subject to recontamination by surface water runoff and a later point before or at the first customer .

(3) At least 99.0 per cent (2 log) removal of Cryptosporidium between a point where the raw water is not subject to recontamination by surface water runoff and a later point before or at the first customer.

(B) A public water system using a surface water source, in whole or in part, shall be in compliance with paragraph (A) of this rule if the public water system meets the filtration requirements of rule 3745-81-73 of the Administrative Code and the disinfection requirements of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code.

(C) The owner of a public water system using a surface water source, in whole or in part, shall place the operation of the public water system under the supervision of an operator of record. The operator of record shall have a valid certification in accordance with Chapter 3745-7 of the Administrative Code.

(D) "Uncovered finished water storage facility" means a tank, reservoir, or other facility used to store water that will undergo no further treatment except residual disinfection and is open to the atmosphere. Systems are not permitted to begin construction of uncovered finished water storage facilities. Failure to comply with this requirement is a treatment technique violation.

(E) A new surface water source shall be sampled for twelve consecutive months and analyzed for the contaminants that are listed in the appendix to this rule, "Required Analyses for New Surface Water Sources." The director may reduce or add to the contaminants that are listed in the appendix to this rule because of treatment, promulgated drinking water standards, or other criteria. Other criteria may include existing or emerging contaminants which may pose a threat to public health. Samples collected from a public water system surface water source shall be analyzed in a laboratory certified to analyze drinking water for contaminants in accordance with Chapter 3745-89 of the Administrative Code. The analytical methods shall be the same as required by the entry point to the distribution system monitoring in accordance with rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code and shall include all the volatile organic and synthetic organic analytes that are quantified by the laboratory for the organic analytical method. Cryptosporidium samples for new surface water sources shall be collected in accordance with the source monitoring requirements in rules 3745-81-65 and 3745-81-66 of the Administrative Code.

Click to view Appendix

Effective: 10/05/2013
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/16/2013 and 10/05/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/31/90, 01/01/02, 01/01/05, 01/08/10

3745-81-72 Disinfection of water from surface water sources.

"Disinfection practice" means the application of a disinfectant to the treatment flow for the purpose of meeting CT requirements of this rule. Significant changes to disinfection practice include any change which will affect the ability of a system to meet the CT requirements of this rule.

(A) A public water system that uses a surface water source, in whole or in part, shall provide the disinfection treatment specified in paragraph (B) of this rule. Failure to meet any requirement of this rule, excluding paragraph (E) of this rule, is a treatment technique violation for which public notification is required under rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code. Failure to meet any requirement of paragraph (E) of this rule is a monitoring violation for which public notification is required under rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code. A public water system that uses a surface water source, in whole or in part, and does not already provide filtration treatment shall comply with any interim disinfection requirements established by the director before filtration is installed.

(B) Each public water system that uses a surface water source, in whole or in part, shall provide disinfection treatment of the water as follows:

(1) The disinfection treatment shall be considered sufficient if the total treatment processes of that public water system would consistently and reliably achieve at least 99.9 per cent (3 log) inactivation and/or removal of Giardia lamblia cysts and at least 99.99 per cent (4 log) inactivation and/or removal of viruses, as determined from table A, and tables B-1 to B-13 of this rule or tables under paragraph (N) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code. The inactivation by disinfection is calculated from the actual CT divided by the required CT during the peak hourly flow of each day that the public water system is in operation.

(2) Table A of this rule lists: the minimum requirement for inactivation and/or removal of Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia and viruses; the extent to which a properly operated conventional filtration treatment, direct filtration, and slow sand filtration are considered sufficient to remove Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, and viruses; and the minimum disinfection needed to complete the required minimum inactivation and/or removal of Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia and viruses. Table A specifies the additional minimum log inactivation of Giardia lamblia and viruses by disinfection if filtration is properly operated and the turbidity treatment technique requirements of rule 3745-81-73 of the Administrative Code are satisfied. The filtration and disinfection treatment shall include disinfection that consistently and reliably achieves at least the minimum log inactivation by disinfection of Giardia lamblia and viruses as specified in table A.

(3) The residual disinfectant concentration in the water entering the distribution system shall not be less than 0.2 milligram per liter free chlorine or one milligram per liter combined chlorine for more than four consecutive hours.

(4) The residual disinfectant concentration in the distribution system shall not be less than 0.2 milligram per liter free chlorine or one milligram per liter combined chlorine in more than five per cent of the samples each month for any two consecutive months that the public water system serves water to the public.

(C) Disinfection treatment sufficiency determination.

(1) Paragraph (B)(1) of this rule requires a minimum percentage of inactivation and/or removal of Giardia lamblia and viruses in water obtained at least partly from a surface water source. Because of the difficulties in measuring the concentrations of viable Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, and viruses, maximum contaminant levels are not practical and treatment technique requirements are used to ensure control of these contaminants in drinking water. For disinfectants other than UV, tables B-1 to B-13 of this rule shall be used to determine the sufficiency of disinfection. This determination is made at the peak hourly flow rate of each day the water system is in operation. Systems using UV to comply with the inactivation requirements of this rule shall meet paragraph (N) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code.

(2) For disinfectants other than UV, the level of inactivation being provided by the system is determined by measuring actual CT values. The level of inactivation being provided by a system using UV is determined by the UV dosage. For systems using chlorine dioxide or ozone to comply with the additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements in paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-67 of the Administrative Code, unfiltered water flow may be used to achieve the additional treatment credit if approved by the director.

Only filtered water flow shall be used in the required CT calculations to meet the minimum log inactivation in table A of this rule, regardless of the disinfectant used.

Actual CT values are obtained by multiplying the residual disinfectant, C, by the disinfection contact time, T, giving the resultant, CT. The value of C in milligrams per liter is determined at a point before or at the first customer. The value of T in minutes is based on the time available for the disinfectant to work from the point at which it is added to the water until the point at which C is measured. Values of T are determined based on the approved effective volume factor of the clearwell or contact tank. It may be appropriate to determine the value of C at more than one point of the water treatment flow, with the T associated with each C being estimated from the previous measurement point or the previous addition of disinfectant, which ever is closer. If more than one disinfectant concentration point is used, the products of each C and its associated T are added and the sum of these products is the actual CT value to compare with the appropriate value of the required minimum CT values for specified conditions and levels of inactivation in the following tables. Note that any disinfection after the last determination of C is not included in the actual CT value. Minimum required CT values for inactivation of Giardia lamblia and viruses by disinfection in relation to the disinfectant, the extent of inactivation, the disinfectant concentration, the pH, and the water temperature at the peak hourly flow rate for each day of operation are found in tables B-1 to B-13 of this rule. Applicable information for UV is found in paragraph (N) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code.

(3) In tables B-1 to B-13 of this rule, the required CT between the indicated pH or residual disinfectant concentration may be determined by linear interpolation. The required CT between the indicated temperatures of different tables may be determined by linear interpolation.

If no interpolation is used, then the required CT shall be determined at the lower temperature, and at the higher pH, and at the higher residual disinfectant concentration. For Giardia lamblia inactivation at a pH greater than nine, the required CT shall be the same as the required CT at a pH equal to nine. For virus inactivation at a pH greater than nine, the required CT shall be the same as the required CT at a pH equal to ten.

(4) On each day when the actual CT value meets or exceeds the required minimum CT value in or linearly interpolated from tables B-1 to B-13 of this rule for chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, or chloramines, or the table in paragraph (N) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code for UV disinfection, then the water treatment plant is considered to be satisfying treatment technique requirements of this rule for disinfection of surface water sources. On each day when the actual CT value does not meet or exceed the required minimum CT value from tables B-1 to B-13 of this rule, then the water treatment plant is in violation of paragraph (B)(1) of this rule.

(5) For each clearwell, or contact tank, the approved effective volume factor shall be determined by the director based upon its design characteristics including: the average flow path length to channel width ratio; baffling; and the proximity of the outlet to the inlet using figures B-1 and B-2 of this rule. The approved effective volume factor shall be the preliminary effective volume factor obtained from figure B-1 of this rule multiplied by the reduction factor obtained from figure B-2 of this rule, rounded down to the nearest 0.05. A public water system may request that the director approve an effective volume factor that was determined by tracer studies, hydraulic analysis or modeling, or an equivalent demonstration. For a tracer study to be acceptable, the net advection of the tracer shall be within ten per cent of the change in the tracer chemical storage within the clearwell system. Net advection means the amount of tracer convected out of the clearwell system minus the amount of tracer convected into the clearwell system over the duration of the tracer study.

[Note: Refer to the appendix to this rule for more information on how to determine disinfection sufficiency.]

(D) A public water system that serves a population of at least ten thousand persons and was required to develop a disinfection profile or benchmark under 40 CFR 141.172 or 40 CFR 141.170(d) , or a community or nontransient noncommunity public water system that serves a population of less than ten thousand persons and was required to develop a disinfection profile or benchmark under 40 CFR 141.530 , shall follow these requirements:

(1) Prior to making a significant change in its disinfection practice, the public water system shall submit the disinfection profile to the director for review and consultation. Such changes may require approval if determined substantial by the director as specified by rule 3745-91-02 of the Administrative Code. Significant changes to disinfection practice include any of the following:

(a) Changes to the point of disinfection;

(b) Changes to the disinfectant used in the treatment plant;

(c) Changes to the disinfection process; and

(d) Any other modification identified by the director, including those identified and proposed in a general plan required by paragraph (A)(7) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

[Comment: The 40 CFR 141.172 , 40 CFR 141.170(d) , and 40 CFR 141.530 refer to the "Code of Federal Regulations" published on July 1, 2012. At the effective date of this rule, a copy may be obtained from the "Superintendent of Documents, PO Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954," (866) 512-1800, or http://bookstore.gpo.gov. This document is available for review at "Ohio EPA, Lazarus Government Center, 50 West Town Street, Columbus, OH, 43215-3425."]

(2) The public water system shall calculate its disinfection benchmark using the following procedure:

(a) The disinfection benchmark is the lowest monthly average value (for public water systems with one year of profiling data) or average of lowest monthly average values (for public water systems with more than one year of profiling data) of the monthly logs of Giardia lamblia inactivation in each year of profiling data.

(b) For each year of profiling data collected and calculated, the public water system shall determine the lowest average monthly Giardia lamblia inactivation in each year of profiling data. The average Giardia lamblia inactivation shall be determined by dividing the sum of Giardia lamblia inactivation values by the number of values calculated for that month. For public water systems with a combined population of at least ten thousand persons, daily values shall be used. For public water systems with a combined population less than ten thousand persons, weekly values may be used. Values for each calendar month for each year of profiling data shall be used in the calculation.

(3) A public water system that uses chloramines, chlorine dioxide, or ozone for primary disinfection shall also calculate the disinfection benchmark for viruses using a method acceptable to the director.

(4) Prior to making a significant change, the public water system shall submit the following information for review by the director:

(a) A description of the proposed change;

(b) The disinfection profile for Giardia lamblia (and, if necessary, viruses) and disinfection benchmark; and

(c) An analysis of how the proposed change will affect the current levels of disinfection.

(5) The public water system shall retain the disinfection profile data in graphic form, as a spreadsheet, or in some other format acceptable to the director for review as part of a sanitary survey. The disinfection profile, disinfection benchmark, and all data and analysis used to complete the disinfection profile shall be retained by the public water system indefinitely.

(E) Disinfection profiling and benchmarking requirements for any system making a significant change to their disinfection practice.

(1) Following the completion of initial source water monitoring in accordance with paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-65 of the Administrative Code, a system that plans to make a significant change to its disinfection practice, as defined in paragraph (E)(2) of this rule, shall develop disinfection profiles and calculate disinfection benchmarks for Giardia lamblia and viruses as described in paragraphs (E)(3) to (E)(7) of this rule. Prior to changing the disinfection practice, the system shall notify the director and shall include in this notice the following information:

(a) A completed disinfection profile and disinfection benchmark for Giardia lamblia and viruses as described in paragraphs (E)(3) to (E)(7) of this rule.

(b) A description of the proposed change in disinfection practice.

(c) An analysis of how the proposed change will affect the current level of disinfection.

(2) Significant changes to disinfection practices include any of the following:

(a) Changes to the point of disinfection;

(b) Changes to the disinfectant used in the treatment plant:

(c) Changes to the disinfection process; or

(d) Any other modification identified by the director as a significant change to disinfection practice.

(3) Systems required to develop disinfection profiles in accordance with paragraphs (E)(1) and (E)(2) of this rule shall monitor at least weekly for a period of twelve consecutive months to determine the total log inactivation for Giardia lamblia and viruses. If systems monitor more frequently, the monitoring frequency shall be evenly spaced. Systems that operate for fewer than twelve months per year shall monitor weekly during the period of operation. Systems shall determine log inactivation for Giardia lamblia and viruses through the entire plant, based on CT99.9 values in tables B-1 to B-13 of this rule, as applicable. Systems shall determine log inactivation of viruses through the entire treatment plant based on a protocol accepted by the director.

(4) Systems with a single point of disinfectant application prior to the entrance to the distribution system shall conduct the monitoring in this paragraph. Systems with more than one point of disinfectant application shall conduct the monitoring in this paragraph for each disinfection segment. Systems shall monitor the parameters necessary to determine the total inactivation ratio, using analytical methods in accordance with paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code.

(a) For systems using a disinfectant other than UV, the temperature of the disinfected water shall be measured at each residual disinfectant concentration sampling point during peak hourly flow or at an alternative location accepted by the director.

(b) For systems using chlorine, the pH of the disinfected water shall be measured at each chlorine residual disinfectant concentration sampling point during peak hourly flow or at an alternative location accepted by the director.

(c) The disinfectant contact time(s), T, shall be determined during peak hourly flow.

(d) The residual disinfectant concentration(s), C, of the water before or at the first customer and prior to each additional point of disinfectant application shall be measured during peak hourly flow.

(5) In lieu of conducting new monitoring under paragraph (E)(4) of this rule, systems may elect to meet the requirements of paragraph (E)(5)(a) or (E)(5)(b) of this rule.

(a) Systems that have at least one year of existing data that are substantially equivalent to data collected under the provisions of paragraph (E)(4) of this rule may use these data to develop disinfection profiles as specified in this rule if the system has neither made a significant change to the treatment practice nor changed sources since the data were collected. Systems may develop disinfection profiles using up to three years of existing data.

(b) Systems may use disinfection profile(s) developed in accordance with paragraph (D) of this rule in lieu of developing a new profile if the system has neither made a significant change to the treatment practice nor changed sources since the profile was developed. Systems that have not developed a virus profile under paragraph (D) of this rule shall develop a virus profile using the same monitoring data on which the Giardia lamblia profile is based.

(6) Systems shall calculate the total inactivation ratio for Giardia lamblia as specified in paragraphs (E)(6)(a) to (E)(6)(c) of this rule.

(a) Systems using only one point of disinfectant application may determine the total inactivation ratio for the disinfection segment based on either of the following:

(i) Determine one inactivation ratio (CTcalc/CT99.9) before or at the first customer during peak hourly flow.

(ii) Determine successive CTcalc/CT99.9 values, representing sequential inactivation ratios, between the point of disinfectant application and a point before or at the first customer during peak hourly flow. The system shall calculate the total inactivation ratio by determining (CTcalc/CT99.9) for each sequence and then adding the (CTcalc/CT99.9) values together to determine ([SIGAM] (CTcalc/CT99.9)).

(b) Systems using more than one point of disinfectant application before the first customer shall determine the CT value of each disinfection segment immediately prior to the next point of disinfectant application, or for the final segment, before or at the first customer, during peak hourly flow. The (CTcalc/CT99.9) value of each segment and ([SIGAM] (CTcalc/CT99.9)) shall be calculated using the method in paragraph (E)(6)(a)(ii) of this rule.

(c) The system shall determine the total logs of inactivation by multiplying the value calculated in paragraph (E)(6)(a) or (E)(6)(b) of this rule by 3.0.

(d) Systems shall calculate the log of inactivation for viruses using a protocol approved by the director.

(7) Systems shall use the following procedures to calculate a disinfection benchmark:

(a) For each year of profiling data collected and calculated under paragraphs (E)(3) to (E)(6) of this rule, systems shall determine the lowest average monthly level of both Giardia lamblia and virus inactivation. Systems shall determine the average Giardia lamblia and virus inactivation for each calendar month for each year of profiling data by dividing the sum of daily or weekly Giardia lamblia and virus log inactivation by the number of values calculated for that month.

(b) The disinfection benchmark is the lowest monthly average value (for systems with one year of profiling data) or the average of the lowest monthly average values (for systems with more than one year of profiling data) of Giardia lamblia and virus log inactivation in each year of profiling data.

Table A Minimum Requirements For Inactivation Or Removal of Cryptosporidium, Giardia Lamblia, and Viruses

Type of Filtration

Required Minimum Log Removal/Inactivation

Expected Log Removal by Filtration

Minimum Log Inactivation by Disinfection

  

Cryptosporidium (Log Removal Only)

Giardia

Viruses

Cryptosporidium

Giardia

Viruses

Giardia

Viruses

Conventional

2

3

4

2

2.5

2.0

0.5

2.0

Direct

2

3

4

2

2.0

1.0

1.0

3.0

Slow Sand

2

3

4

2

2.0

2.0

1.0

2.0

Comment: Log removal and log inactivation refer to the negative logarithm of the quotient of the concentration of an impurity after treatment divided by the concentration before treatment. For instance, a 99.9 per cent decrease in viruses has a post treatment concentration 0.001 times the pretreatment concentration and a 3 log removal designation. Common conversions include:

Removal designation

Concentration decrease

Quotient after/before

0.5 log

70%

0.3

1 log

90%

0.1

1.5 log

97%

0.03

2 log

99%

0.01

2.5 log

99.7 %

0.003

3 log

99.9 %

0.001

4 log

99.99 %

0.0001

Table B-1 Required CT For Inactivation Of Giardia Cysts By Free Chlorine At 0.5 ° Celsius Or Less

  

pH<=6 ..............................................................

pH= 6.5 ................................................................

pH= 7.0 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentration

Log Inactivations .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.4

23

46

69

91

114

137

27

54

82

109

136

163

33

65

98

130

163

195

0.6

24

47

71

94

118

141

28

56

84

112

140

168

33

67

100

133

167

200

0.8

24

48

73

97

121

145

29

57

86

115

143

172

34

68

103

137

171

205

1

25

49

74

99

123

148

29

59

88

117

147

176

35

70

105

140

175

210

1.2

25

51

76

101

127

152

30

60

90

120

150

180

36

72

108

143

179

215

1.4

26

52

78

103

129

155

31

61

92

123

153

184

37

74

111

147

184

221

1.6

26

52

79

105

131

157

32

63

95

126

158

189

38

75

113

151

188

226

1.8

27

54

81

108

135

162

32

64

97

129

161

193

39

77

116

154

193

231

2

28

55

83

110

138

165

33

66

99

131

164

197

39

79

118

157

197

236

2.2

28

56

85

113

141

169

34

67

101

134

168

201

40

81

121

161

202

242

2.4

29

57

86

115

143

172

34

68

103

137

171

205

41

82

124

165

206

247

2.6

29

58

88

117

146

175

35

70

105

139

174

209

42

84

126

168

210

252

2.8

30

59

89

119

148

178

36

71

107

142

178

213

43

86

129

171

214

257

3

30

60

91

121

151

181

36

72

109

145

181

217

44

87

131

174

218

261

 

pH= 7.5 ...............................................................

pH= 8.0 ................................................................

pH= 8.5 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentration

Log Inactivations .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.4

40

79

119

158

198

237

46

92

139

185

231

277

55

110

165

219

274

329

0.6

40

80

120

159

199

239

48

95

143

191

238

286

57

114

171

228

285

342

0.8

41

82

123

164

205

246

49

98

148

197

246

295

59

118

177

236

295

354

1

42

84

127

169

211

253

51

101

152

203

253

304

61

122

183

243

304

365

1.2

43

86

130

173

216

259

52

104

157

209

261

313

63

125

188

251

313

376

1.4

44

89

133

177

222

266

54

107

161

214

268

321

65

129

194

258

323

387

1.6

46

91

137

182

228

273

55

110

165

219

274

329

66

132

199

265

331

397

1.8

47

93

140

186

233

279

56

113

169

225

282

338

68

136

204

271

339

407

2

48

95

143

191

238

286

58

115

173

231

288

346

70

139

209

278

348

417

2.2

50

99

149

198

248

297

59

118

177

235

294

353

71

142

213

284

355

426

2.4

50

99

149

199

248

298

60

120

181

241

301

361

73

145

218

290

363

435

2.6

51

101

152

203

253

304

61

123

184

245

307

368

74

148

222

296

370

444

2.8

52

103

155

207

258

310

63

125

188

250

313

375

75

151

226

301

377

452

3

53

105

158

211

263

316

64

127

191

255

318

382

77

153

230

307

383

460

  

pH= 9.0 or pH> 9.0 ..............................................................

Chlorine Concentration

Log Inactivations .............................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.4

65

130

195

260

325

390

0.6

68

136

204

271

339

407

0.8

70

141

211

281

352

422

1

73

146

219

291

364

437

1.2

75

150

226

301

376

451

1.4

77

155

232

309

387

464

1.6

80

159

239

318

398

477

1.8

82

163

245

326

408

489

2

83

167

250

333

417

500

2.2

85

170

256

341

426

511

2.4

87

174

261

348

435

522

2.6

89

178

267

355

444

533

2.8

91

181

272

362

453

543

3

92

184

276

368

460

552

[Comment: CT99.9 = CT for 3 log inactivation.]

Table B-2 Required CT For Inactivation Of Giardia Cysts By Free Chlorine At 5° Celsius

  

pH<=6 ..............................................................

pH= 6.5 ................................................................

pH= 7.0 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.4

16

32

49

65

81

97

20

39

59

78

98

117

23

46

70

93

116

139

0.6

17

33

50

67

83

100

20

40

60

80

100

120

24

48

72

95

119

143

0.8

17

34

52

69

86

103

20

41

61

81

102

122

24

49

73

97

122

146

1

18

35

53

70

88

105

21

42

63

83

104

125

25

50

75

99

124

149

1.2

18

36

54

71

89

107

21

42

64

85

106

127

25

51

76

101

127

152

1.4

18

36

55

73

91

109

22

43

65

87

108

130

26

52

78

103

129

155

1.6

19

37

56

74

93

111

22

44

66

88

110

132

26

53

79

105

132

158

1.8

19

38

57

76

95

114

23

45

68

90

113

135

27

54

81

108

135

162

2

19

39

58

77

97

116

23

46

69

92

115

138

28

55

83

110

138

165

2.2

20

39

59

79

98

118

23

47

70

93

117

140

28

56

85

113

141

169

2.4

20

40

60

80

100

120

24

48

72

95

119

143

29

57

86

115

143

172

2.6

20

41

61

81

102

122

24

49

73

97

122

146

29

58

88

117

146

175

2.8

21

41

62

83

103

124

25

49

74

99

123

148

30

59

89

119

148

178

3

21

42

63

84

105

126

25

50

76

101

126

151

30

61

91

121

152

182

  

pH= 7.5 ..............................................................

pH= 8.0 ................................................................

pH= 8.5 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.4

28

55

83

111

138

166

33

66

99

132

165

198

39

79

118

157

197

236

0.6

29

57

86

114

143

171

34

68

102

136

170

204

41

81

122

163

203

244

0.8

29

58

88

117

146

175

35

70

105

140

175

210

42

84

126

168

210

252

1

30

60

90

119

149

179

36

72

108

144

180

216

43

87

130

173

217

260

1.2

31

61

92

122

153

183

37

74

111

147

184

221

45

89

134

178

223

267

1.4

31

62

94

125

156

187

38

76

114

151

189

227

46

91

137

183

228

274

1.6

32

64

96

128

160

192

39

77

116

155

193

232

47

94

141

187

234

281

1.8

33

65

98

131

163

196

40

79

119

159

198

238

48

96

144

191

239

287

2

33

67

100

133

167

200

41

81

122

162

203

243

49

98

147

196

245

294

2.2

34

68

102

136

170

204

41

83

124

165

207

248

50

100

150

200

250

300

2.4

35

70

105

139

174

209

42

84

127

169

211

253

51

102

153

204

255

306

2.6

36

71

107

142

178

213

43

86

129

172

215

258

52

104

156

208

260

312

2.8

36

72

109

145

181

217

44

88

132

175

219

263

53

106

159

212

265

318

3

37

74

111

147

184

221

45

89

134

179

223

268

54

108

162

216

270

324

  

pH= 9.0 or pH> 9.0 ..............................................................

Chlorine Concentration

Log Inactivations .............................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.4

47

93

140

186

233

279

0.6

49

97

146

194

243

291

0.8

50

100

151

201

251

301

1

52

104

156

208

260

312

1.2

53

107

160

213

267

320

1.4

55

110

165

219

274

329

1.6

56

112

169

225

281

337

1.8

58

115

173

230

288

345

2

59

118

177

235

294

353

2.2

60

120

181

241

301

361

2.4

61

123

184

245

307

368

2.6

63

125

188

250

313

375

2.8

64

127

191

255

318

382

3

65

130

195

259

324

389

[Comment: CT99.9 = CT for 3 log inactivation.]

Table B-3 Required CT For Inactivation Of Giardia Cysts By Free Chlorine At 10° Celsius

  

pH<=6 ..............................................................

pH= 6.5................................................................

pH= 7.0................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on

.............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

12

24

37

49

61

73

15

29

44

59

73

88

17

35

52

69

87

104

0.6

13

25

38

50

63

75

15

30

45

60

75

90

18

36

54

71

89

107

0.8

13

26

39

52

65

78

15

31

46

61

77

92

18

37

55

73

92

110

1

13

26

40

53

66

79

16

31

47

63

78

94

19

37

56

75

93

112

1.2

13

27

40

53

67

80

16

32

48

63

79

95

19

38

57

76

95

114

1.4

14

27

41

55

68

82

16

33

49

65

82

98

19

39

58

77

97

116

1.6

14

28

42

55

69

83

17

33

50

66

83

99

20

40

60

79

99

119

1.8

14

29

43

57

72

86

17

34

51

67

84

101

20

41

61

81

102

122

2

15

29

44

58

73

87

17

35

52

69

87

104

21

41

62

83

103

124

2.2

15

30

45

59

74

89

18

35

53

70

88

105

21

42

64

85

106

127

2.4

15

30

45

60

75

90

18

36

54

71

89

107

22

43

65

86

108

129

2.6

15

31

46

61

77

92

18

37

55

73

92

110

22

44

66

87

109

131

2.8

16

31

47

62

78

93

19

37

56

74

93

111

22

45

67

89

112

134

3

16

32

48

63

79

95

19

38

57

75

94

113

23

46

69

91

114

137

  

pH= 7.5 ..............................................................

pH= 8.0 ................................................................

pH= 8.5 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

21

42

63

83

104

125

25

50

75

99

124

149

30

59

89

118

148

177

0.6

21

43

64

85

107

128

26

51

77

102

128

153

31

61

92

122

153

183

0.8

22

44

66

87

109

131

26

53

79

105

132

158

32

63

95

126

158

189

1

22

45

67

89

112

134

27

54

81

108

135

162

33

65

98

130

163

195

1.2

23

46

69

91

114

137

28

55

83

111

138

166

33

67

100

133

167

200

1.4

23

47

70

93

117

140

28

57

85

113

142

170

34

69

103

137

172

206

1.6

24

48

72

96

120

144

29

58

87

116

145

174

35

70

106

141

176

211

1.8

25

49

74

98

123

147

30

60

90

119

149

179

36

72

108

143

179

215

2

25

50

75

100

125

150

30

61

91

121

152

182

37

74

111

147

184

221

2.2

26

51

77

102

128

153

31

62

93

124

155

186

38

75

113

150

188

225

2.4

26

52

79

105

131

157

32

63

95

127

158

190

38

77

115

153

192

230

2.6

27

53

80

107

133

160

32

65

97

129

162

194

39

78

117

156

195

234

2.8

27

54

82

109

136

163

33

66

99

131

164

197

40

80

120

159

199

239

3

28

55

83

111

138

166

34

67

101

134

168

201

41

81

122

162

203

243

  

pH= 9.0 or pH> 9.0 ..............................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

35

70

105

139

174

209

0.6

36

73

109

145

182

218

0.8

38

75

113

151

188

226

1

39

78

117

156

195

234

1.2

40

80

120

160

200

240

1.4

41

82

124

165

206

247

1.6

42

84

127

169

211

253

1.8

43

86

130

173

216

259

2

44

88

133

177

221

265

2.2

45

90

136

181

226

271

2.4

46

92

138

184

230

276

2.6

47

94

141

187

234

281

2.8

48

96

144

191

239

287

3

49

97

146

195

243

292

[Comment: CT99.9 = CT for 3 log inactivation.]

Table B-4 Required CT For Inactivation Of Giardia Cysts By Free Chlorine At 15° Celsius

  

pH<=6 ..............................................................

pH= 6.5 ................................................................

pH= 7.0 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

8

16

25

33

41

49

10

20

30

39

49

59

12

23

35

47

58

70

0.6

8

17

25

33

42

50

10

20

30

40

50

60

12

24

36

48

60

72

0.8

9

17

26

35

43

52

10

20

31

41

51

61

12

24

37

49

61

73

1

9

18

27

35

44

53

11

21

32

42

53

63

13

25

38

50

63

75

1.2

9

18

27

36

45

54

11

21

32

43

53

64

13

25

38

51

63

76

1.4

9

18

28

37

46

55

11

22

33

43

54

65

13

26

39

52

65

78

1.6

9

19

28

37

47

56

11

22

33

44

55

66

13

26

40

53

66

79

1.8

10

19

29

38

48

57

11

23

34

45

57

68

14

27

41

54

68

81

2

10

19

29

39

48

58

12

23

35

46

58

69

14

28

42

55

69

83

2.2

10

20

30

39

49

59

12

23

35

47

58

70

14

28

43

57

71

85

2.4

10

20

30

40

50

60

12

24

36

48

60

72

14

29

43

57

72

86

2.6

10

20

31

41

51

61

12

24

37

49

61

73

15

29

44

59

73

88

2.8

10

21

31

41

52

62

12

25

37

49

62

74

15

30

45

59

74

89

3

11

21

32

42

53

63

13

25

38

51

63

76

15

30

46

61

76

91

  

pH= 7.5 ..............................................................

pH= 8.0 ................................................................

pH= 8.5 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

14

28

42

55

69

83

17

33

50

66

83

99

20

39

59

79

98

118

0.6

14

29

43

57

72

86

17

34

51

68

85

102

20

41

61

81

102

122

0.8

15

29

44

59

73

88

18

35

53

70

88

105

21

42

63

84

105

126

1

15

30

45

60

75

90

18

36

54

72

90

108

22

43

65

87

108

130

1.2

15

31

46

61

77

92

19

37

56

74

93

111

22

45

67

89

112

134

1.4

16

31

47

63

78

94

19

38

57

76

95

114

23

46

69

91

114

137

1.6

16

32

48

64

80

96

19

39

58

77

97

116

24

47

71

94

118

141

1.8

16

33

49

65

82

98

20

40

60

79

99

119

24

48

72

96

120

144

2

17

33

50

67

83

100

20

41

61

81

102

122

25

49

74

98

123

147

2.2

17

34

51

68

85

102

21

41

62

83

103

124

25

50

75

100

125

150

2.4

18

35

53

70

88

105

21

42

64

85

106

127

26

51

77

102

128

153

2.6

18

36

54

71

89

107

22

43

65

86

108

129

26

52

78

104

130

156

2.8

18

36

55

73

91

109

22

44

66

88

110

132

27

53

80

106

133

159

3

19

37

56

74

93

111

22

45

67

89

112

134

27

54

81

108

135

162

  

pH= 9.0 or pH> 9.0 ..............................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

23

47

70

93

117

140

0.6

24

49

73

97

122

146

0.8

25

50

76

101

126

151

1

26

52

78

104

130

156

1.2

27

53

80

107

133

160

1.4

28

55

83

110

138

165

1.6

28

56

85

113

141

169

1.8

29

58

87

115

144

173

2

30

59

89

118

148

177

2.2

30

60

91

121

151

181

2.4

31

61

92

123

153

184

2.6

31

63

94

125

157

188

2.8

32

64

96

127

159

191

3

33

65

98

130

163

195

[Comment: CT99.9 = CT for 3 log inactivation.]

Table B-5 Required CT For Inactivation Of Giardia Cysts By Free Chlorine At 20° Celsius

  

pH<=6 ..............................................................

pH= 6.5 ................................................................

pH= 7.0 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

6

12

18

24

30

36

7

15

22

29

37

44

9

17

26

35

43

52

0.6

6

13

19

25

32

38

8

15

23

30

38

45

9

18

27

36

45

54

0.8

7

13

20

26

33

39

8

15

23

31

38

46

9

18

28

37

46

55

1

7

13

20

26

33

39

8

16

24

31

39

47

9

19

28

37

47

56

1.2

7

13

20

27

33

40

8

16

24

32

40

48

10

19

29

38

48

57

1.4

7

14

21

27

34

41

8

16

25

33

41

49

10

19

29

39

48

58

1.6

7

14

21

28

35

42

8

17

25

33

42

50

10

20

30

39

49

59

1.8

7

14

22

29

36

43

9

17

26

34

43

51

10

20

31

41

51

61

2

7

15

22

29

37

44

9

17

26

35

43

52

10

21

31

41

52

62

2.2

7

15

22

29

37

44

9

18

27

35

44

53

11

21

32

42

53

63

2.4

8

15

23

30

38

45

9

18

27

36

45

54

11

22

33

43

54

65

2.6

8

15

23

31

38

46

9

18

28

37

46

55

11

22

33

44

55

66

2.8

8

16

24

31

39

47

9

19

28

37

47

56

11

22

34

45

56

67

3

8

16

24

31

39

47

10

19

29

38

48

57

11

23

34

45

57

68

  

pH= 7.5 ..............................................................

pH= 8.0 ................................................................

pH= 8.5 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

10

21

31

41

52

62

12

25

37

49

62

74

15

30

45

59

74

89

0.6

11

21

32

43

53

64

13

26

39

51

64

77

15

31

46

61

77

92

0.8

11

22

33

44

55

66

13

26

40

53

66

79

16

32

48

63

79

95

1

11

22

34

45

56

67

14

27

41

54

68

81

16

33

49

65

82

98

1.2

12

23

35

46

58

69

14

28

42

55

69

83

17

33

50

67

83

100

1.4

12

23

35

47

58

70

14

28

43

57

71

85

17

34

52

69

86

103

1.6

12

24

36

48

60

72

15

29

44

58

73

87

18

35

53

70

88

105

1.8

12

25

37

49

62

74

15

30

45

59

74

89

18

36

54

72

90

108

2

13

25

38

50

63

75

15

30

46

61

76

91

18

37

55

73

92

110

2.2

13

26

39

51

64

77

16

31

47

62

78

93

19

38

57

75

94

113

2.4

13

26

39

52

65

78

16

32

48

63

79

95

19

38

58

77

96

115

2.6

13

27

40

53

67

80

16

32

49

65

81

97

20

39

59

78

98

117

2.8

14

27

41

54

68

81

17

33

50

66

83

99

20

40

60

79

99

119

3

14

28

42

55

69

83

17

34

51

67

84

101

20

41

61

81

102

122

  

pH= 9.0 or pH> 9.0 ..............................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations .............................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

18

35

53

70

88

105

0.6

18

36

55

73

91

109

0.8

19

38

57

75

94

113

1

20

39

59

78

98

117

1.2

20

40

60

80

100

120

1.4

21

41

62

82

103

123

1.6

21

42

63

84

105

126

1.8

22

43

65

86

108

129

2

22

44

66

88

110

132

2.2

23

45

68

90

113

135

2.4

23

46

69

92

115

138

2.6

24

47

71

94

118

141

2.8

24

48

72

95

119

143

3

24

49

73

97

122

146

[Comment: CT99.9 = CT for 3 log inactivation.]

Table B-6 Required CT For Inactivation Of Giardia Cysts By Free Chlorine At 25° Celsius And Greater

  

pH<=6 ..............................................................

pH= 6.5 ................................................................

pH= 7.0 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

4

8

12

16

20

24

5

10

15

19

24

29

6

12

18

23

29

35

0.6

4

8

13

17

21

25

5

10

15

20

25

30

6

12

18

24

30

36

0.8

4

9

13

17

22

26

5

10

16

21

26

31

6

12

19

25

31

37

1

4

9

13

17

22

26

5

10

16

21

26

31

6

12

19

25

31

37

1.2

5

9

14

18

23

27

5

11

16

21

27

32

6

13

19

25

32

38

1.4

5

9

14

18

23

27

6

11

17

22

28

33

7

13

20

26

33

39

1.6

5

9

14

19

23

28

6

11

17

22

28

33

7

13

20

27

33

40

1.8

5

10

15

19

24

29

6

11

17

23

28

34

7

14

21

27

34

41

2

5

10

15

19

24

29

6

12

18

23

29

35

7

14

21

27

34

41

2.2

5

10

15

20

25

30

6

12

18

23

29

35

7

14

21

28

35

42

2.4

5

10

15

20

25

30

6

12

18

24

30

36

7

14

22

29

36

43

2.6

5

10

16

21

26

31

6

12

19

25

31

37

7

15

22

29

37

44

2.8

5

10

16

21

26

31

6

12

19

25

31

37

8

15

23

30

38

45

3

5

11

16

21

27

32

6

13

19

25

32

38

8

15

23

31

38

46

  

pH= 7.5 ..............................................................

pH= 8.0 ................................................................

pH= 8.5 ................................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations on .............................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

Log Inactivations ................................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

7

14

21

28

35

42

8

17

25

33

42

50

10

20

30

39

49

59

0.6

7

14

22

29

36

43

9

17

26

34

43

51

10

20

31

41

51

61

0.8

7

15

22

29

37

44

9

18

27

35

44

53

11

21

32

42

53

63

1

8

15

23

30

38

45

9

18

27

36

45

54

11

22

33

43

54

65

1.2

8

15

23

31

38

46

9

18

28

37

46

55

11

22

34

45

56

67

1.4

8

16

24

31

39

47

10

19

29

38

48

57

12

23

35

46

58

69

1.6

8

16

24

32

40

48

10

19

29

39

48

58

12

23

35

47

58

70

1.8

8

16

25

33

41

49

10

20

30

40

50

60

12

24

36

48

60

72

2

8

17

25

33

42

50

10

20

31

41

51

61

12

25

37

49

62

74

2.2

9

17

26

34

43

51

10

21

31

41

52

62

13

25

38

50

63

75

2.4

9

17

26

35

43

52

11

21

32

42

53

63

13

26

39

51

64

77

2.6

9

18

27

35

44

53

11

22

33

43

54

65

13

26

39

52

65

78

2.8

9

18

27

36

45

54

11

22

33

44

55

66

13

27

40

53

67

80

3

9

18

28

37

46

55

11

22

34

45

56

67

14

27

41

54

68

81

  

pH= 9.0 or pH> 9.0 ..............................................................

Chlorine Concentrati

Log Inactivations .............................................................

(mg/L)

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

<= 0.4

12

23

35

47

58

70

0.6

12

24

37

49

61

73

0.8

13

25

38

50

63

75

1

13

26

39

52

65

78

1.2

13

27

40

53

67

80

1.4

14

27

41

55

68

82

1.6

14

28

42

56

70

84

1.8

14

29

43

57

72

86

2

15

29

44

59

73

88

2.2

15

30

45

60

75

90

2.4

15

31

46

61

77

92

2.6

16

31

47

63

78

94

2.8

16

32

48

64

80

96

3

16

32

49

65

81

97

[Comment: CT99.9 = CT for 3 log inactivation.]

Table B-7 Required CT For Inactivation of Viruses by Free Chlorine

 

····························· Log Inactivation ·····························

  

2.0 Log

3.0 Log

4.0 Log

Temperature (Celsius)

pH 6-9

pH 10

pH 6-9

pH 10

pH 6-9

pH 10

0.5

6

45

9

66

12

90

5

4

30

6

44

8

60

10

3

22

4

33

6

45

15

2

15

3

22

4

30

20

1

11

2

16

3

22

25

1

7

1

11

2

15

Table B-8 CT Values for Inactivation of Giardia Cysts by Chlorine Dioxide pH 6-9

  

···························· Temperature (Celsius) ···························

Log Inactivation

<=1

5

10

15

20

>=25

0.5

10

4.3

4

3.2

2.5

2

1

21

8.7

7.7

6.3

5

3.7

1.5

32

13

12

10

7.5

5.5

2

42

17

15

13

10

7.3

2.5

52

22

19

16

13

9

3

63

26

23

19

15

11

Table B-9 CT Values for Inactivation of Viruses By Chlorine Dioxide pH 6-9

  

··························· Temperature (Celsius) ····························

Log Inactivation

<=1

5

10

15

20

>=25

2

8.4

5.6

4.2

2.8

2.1

1.4

3

25.6

17.1

12.8

8.6

6.4

4.3

4

50.1

33.4

25.1

16.7

12.5

8.4

Table B-10 CT Values for Inactivation of Giardia Cysts By Ozone pH 6-9

  

·························· Temperature (Celsius) ····························

Log Inactivation

<=1

5

10

15

20

>=25

0.5

0.48

0.32

0.23

0.16

0.12

0.08

1

0.97

0.63

0.48

0.32

0.24

0.16

1.5

1.5

0.95

0.72

0.48

0.36

0.24

2

1.9

1.3

0.95

0.63

0.48

0.32

2.5

2.4

1.6

1.2

0.79

0.60

0.40

3

2.9

1.9

1.43

0.95

0.72

0.48

Table B-11 CT Values for Inactivation of Viruses by Ozone

  

·························· Temperature (Celsius) ·······················

Log Inactivation

<=1

5

10

15

20

>=25

2

0.9

0.6

0.5

0.3

0.25

0.15

3

1.4

0.9

0.8

0.5

0.4

0.25

4

1.8

1.2

1.0

0.6

0.5

0.3

Table B-12

Required CT Values for Inactivation of Giardia Cysts by Chloramine, pH 6.0 - 9.0

Temperature (Celsius)

Log Inactivation

<=1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

0.5

635

568

500

433

365

354

343

332

321

310

298

286

274

262

250

237

224

211

198

185

173

161

149

137

125

1

1270

1136

1003

869

735

711

687

663

639

615

592

569

546

523

500

474

448

422

396

370

346

322

298

274

250

1.5

1900

1700

1500

1300

1100

1066

1032

998

964

930

894

858

822

786

750

710

670

630

590

550

515

480

445

410

375

2

2535

2269

2003

1736

1470

1422

1374

1326

1278

1230

1184

1138

1092

1046

1000

947

894

841

788

735

688

641

594

547

500

2.5

3170

2835

2500

2165

1830

1772

1714

1656

1598

1540

1482

1424

1366

1308

1250

1183

1116

1049

982

915

857

799

741

683

625

3

3800

3400

3000

2600

2200

2130

2060

1990

1920

1850

1780

1710

1640

1570

1500

1420

1340

1260

1180

1100

1030

960

890

820

750

Table B-13

Required CT for Inactivation of Viruses by Chloramine1

Temperature (Celsius)

Log Inactivation

<=1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

2

1243

1147

1050

954

857

814

771

729

686

643

600

557

514

471

428

407

385

364

342

321

300

278

257

235

214

3

2063

1903

1743

1583

1423

1352

1281

1209

1138

1067

996

925

854

783

712

676

641

605

570

534

498

463

427

392

356

4

2883

2659

2436

2212

1988

1889

1789

1690

1590

1491

1392

1292

1193

1093

994

944

895

845

796

746

696

646

597

547

497

1These required CT may be assumed to achieve greater than 99.99 per cent inactivation of viruses only if chlorine is added and mixed in the water prior to the addition of ammonia. If this condition is not met, the public water system must demonstrate, based on onsite studies or other information, as approved by the director, that the public water system is achieving at least 99.99 per cent inactivation of viruses.

image: oh/admin/2014/3745-81-72_PH_FF_A_RU_20130925_1030-1.jpg

Click to view Appendix

Effective: 10/05/2013
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/16/2013 and 10/05/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 01/01/05, 01/08/10, 10/31/10

3745-81-73 Filtration of water from surface water sources.

A public water system that uses a surface water source, in whole or in part, shall provide treatment consisting of both disinfection, as specified in paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code, and filtration treatment which complies with paragraph (A), (B), or (C) of this rule.. Distinction between surface water sources and ground water sources is set forth in rule 3745-81-76 of the Administrative Code. Filtration treatment shall consistently and reliably achieve at least ninety-nine per cent (2 log) removal of Cryptosporidium. Failure to meet any requirement of this rule shall be a treatment technique violation and shall require public notification as set forth in rule 3745-81-32 of the Administrative Code.

(A) Conventional filtration treatment or direct filtration treatment. All public water systems using conventional filtration treatment or direct filtration treatment to treat surface water shall meet the following :

(1) Turbidity levels of representative samples of filtered water shall be less than or equal to 0.3 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) in at least ninety-five per cent of the samples analyzed each month.

(2) The turbidity level of representative samples of a public water system's filtered water shall not exceed one NTU.

(B) Slow sand filtration. Filtration by a public water system filtering surface water by slow sand filtration shall meet the following :

(1) For a public water system using slow sand filtration, the turbidity level of representative samples of filtered water shall be less than or equal to one NTU in at least ninety-five per cent of the samples each month.

(2) The turbidity level of representative samples of a public water system's filtered water shall not exceed five NTU.

(C) Alternative filtration technologies. If a public water system using a surface water source, in whole or in part, can demonstrate to the director, using pilot plant studies or other means, that a filtration technology not listed in paragraph (A) or (B) of this rule, in combination with disinfection treatment that meets the requirements of paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code, consistently and reliably achieves ninety-nine per cent (2 log) removal of Cryptosporidium, 99.9 per cent (3 log) removal and/or inactivation of Giardia lamblia cysts and 99.99 per cent (4 log) removal and/or inactivation of viruses, the director may accept this alternative filtration technology for use by the public water system. For a public water system that makes this demonstration, the requirements of paragraph (A) of this rule apply. For a public water system that makes this demonstration, the minimum log removal and inactivation requirements for conventional filtration in table A of rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code shall apply. Each membrane filter which has been awarded credit for log removal as described in this paragraph shall undergo direct integrity testing daily to verify the log removal it has been credited to achieve. The direct integrity testing requirements in paragraph (K)(3) of rule 3745-81-68 of the Administrative Code shall apply. In addition, continuous filtrate turbidity monitoring shall be performed on each membrane filter. If the turbidity of a membrane filter exceeds 0.15 NTU in two consecutive readings taken fifteen minutes apart, the system shall conduct a direct integrity test on the membrane filter. A membrane filter shall be removed from service for repairs until the membrane filter can pass a direct integrity test to verify the log removal it has been credited to achieve. Systems shall submit a monthly report including daily direct integrity test results, any turbidity monitoring results which trigger direct integrity testing, and any corrective action taken.

Effective: 10/05/2013
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/16/2013 and 10/05/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/31/90, 09/13/93, 01/01/02, 01/01/05, 01/08/10

3745-81-74 Turbidity and disinfection monitoring requirements for surface water systems.

A public water system that uses a surface water source, in whole or in part, shall conduct turbidity and disinfection monitoring in accordance with this rule.

(A) Turbidity measurements to ensure compliance with rule 3745-81-73 of the Administrative Code shall be performed on representative samples of filtered water at least every four hours that the water treatment plant is in operation. If using grab sampling for turbidity monitoring, samples shall be obtained within the first and last hours of filter operation and at least every four hours in between. Systems using grab sampling and monitoring at the clearwell effluent, the plant effluent, or immediately prior to entry into the distribution system shall monitor turbidity at least every four hours unless the high service pumps are locked out for a portion of the day. If the pumps are locked out for a portion of the day, samples shall be taken during the first and last hours of pump operations, and every four hours in-between. A public water system may substitute continuous turbidity monitoring (a reading at least every fifteen minutes) for grab sample monitoring if the public water system validates the continuous measurement for accuracy on a regular basis using a protocol acceptable to the director. Turbidity monitoring of filtered water may be:

(1) At the combined filter effluent prior to entry into the clearwell; or

(2) The average of turbidity measurements from each individual filter effluent if each filter has essentially the same loading rate; or

(3) At the clearwell effluent; or

(4) At the plant effluent or immediately prior to entry into the distribution system.

(B) A public water system using conventional filtration treatment or direct filtration treatment, shall also conduct individual filter turbidity monitoring as follows:

(1) A public water system that provides conventional filtration treatment or direct filtration treatment shall conduct continuous monitoring of turbidity for each individual filter effluent. The public water system shall validate the continuous measurement for accuracy on a regular basis using the protocol acceptable to the director. The public water system shall record the results of individual filter monitoring every fifteen minutes. A public water system serving a combined population of less than ten thousand and which has two filters may conduct continuous monitoring of turbidity of the combined filter effluent, prior to entry into the clearwell, in lieu of individual filter effluent turbidity monitoring. The public water system shall record the results of the combined filter monitoring every fifteen minutes.

(2) If there is a failure in the continuous turbidity monitoring equipment, the public water system shall conduct grab sampling every four hours in lieu of continuous monitoring until the continuous turbidity monitoring equipment is repaired and placed back online. A public water system serving a combined population of at least ten thousand has no more than five working days after the failure of the equipment to repair the continuous turbidity monitoring equipment and to place it back online. A public water system serving a combined population of less than ten thousand has no more than fourteen days after the failure of the equipment to repair the continuous turbidity monitoring equipment and to place it back online.

(C) Turbidity analysis shall be conducted as specified in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code.

(D) The residual disinfectant concentration of the water entering the distribution system shall be monitored continuously, and the lowest value must be recorded each day, except that:

(1) If there is a failure in the continuous disinfection monitoring equipment, the public water system shall conduct grab sampling every four hours in lieu of continuous monitoring until the continuous monitoring equipment is repaired and placed back online. A public water system has no more than five working days after failure of the equipment to repair the continuous monitoring equipment and place it back online; and

(2) Public water systems serving three thousand three hundred or fewer persons may, with prior acceptance by the director, take grab samples in lieu of providing continuous monitoring. Grab sample monitoring shall require at least one sample every four hours that the water treatment plant is in operation. Systems shall monitor disinfectant residual at least every four hours unless the high service pumps are locked out for a portion of the day. If the pumps are locked out for a portion of the day, samples shall be taken during the first and last hours of pump operations, and every four hours in-between.

(E) The residual disinfectant concentration shall be measured at least at the same points in the distribution system and at the same time as total coliforms are sampled, as specified in rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code.

(F) Parameters necessary to determine the sufficiency of disinfection prior to the first customer as required in rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code shall be measured and recorded at the peak hourly flow rate each day the public water system is in operation. Public water systems which do not record any or all of the parameters set forth in paragraphs (F)(1) to (F)(3) of this rule on continuously recording devices, may estimate the period at which peak hourly flow will occur from records of flow rates from previous days for that water plant. The parameters necessary to calculate the actual CT value may then be those measured during this estimated peak hourly flow period. Temperature, pH, and residual disinfection concentration shall be analyzed in accordance with the methods specified in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code. The parameters necessary to calculate the actual CT value include:

(1) The temperature of the disinfected water at each residual disinfectant concentration sampling point.

(2) The pH of the disinfected water at each residual disinfectant concentration sampling point.

(3) The kind of disinfectant used and the residual disinfectant concentration at each sampling point before or at the first customer.

(4) The flow rate, clearwell used volume or depth, approved effective volume factor, and any other parameters needed to calculate the disinfectant contact time for each sampling point during each day's peak hourly flow.

(5) The actual CT value as determined for each day in the month, calculated from the above water temperature, pH, residual disinfectant concentration, disinfectant contact time(s), and other characteristics of the water treatment plant as it was operating at peak hourly flow rate for that day.

(6) The required CT value for each day of the month, determined from the water temperature, the water pH, the disinfectant in use, and other information referred to in rule 3745-81-72 of the Administrative Code.

(7) The number of days, if any, for which the required CT value was greater than the actual CT value.

Effective: 10/05/2013
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/16/2013 and 10/05/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/31/90, 01/01/02, 01/01/05

3745-81-75 Recordkeeping, reporting and actionable requirements.

A public water system that uses a surface water source shall report monthly to the director the information specified in paragraphs (A) to (F) of this rule. In addition, a public water system that must monitor for TTHM, HAA5, bromate, chlorite, total residual chlorine, chlorine dioxide, or TOC shall comply with the applicable sections of paragraph (G) of this rule.

(A) Turbidity determinations as required by paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-74 of the Administrative Code shall be reported to the director within ten days after the end of each month the public water system serves water to the public. The information reported shall include the following:

(1) The total number of filtered water turbidity determinations during the month. When filtered water turbidity is recorded continuously, the reported number shall be the number of hours in which turbidity values were recorded during the month.

(2) The number and per cent of filtered water turbidity determinations during the month which are less than or equal to the turbidity limits specified in paragraph (A)(1) or (B)(1) of rule 3745-81-73 of the Administrative Code for the filtration method being used. For public water systems which continuously monitor turbidity, the duration and per cent of filtered water turbidity readings during the month which are less than or equal to the turbidity limits in paragraph (A)(1) or (B)(1) of rule 3745-81-73 of the Administrative Code shall be reported.

(3) The date and value of each turbidity determination during the month which exceeds any applicable turbidity limit specified in rule 3745-81-73 of the Administrative Code for the filtration method being used. For public water systems which continuously monitor turbidity, the date and duration of each period during the month that the turbidity exceeds the turbidity limit specified in paragraph (A)(1) or (B)(1) and paragraph (A)(2) or (B)(2) of rule 3745-81-73 of the Administrative Code shall be reported.

(B) The following individual filter turbidity monitoring activities as required by paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-74 of the Administrative Code shall be reported to the director as follows:

(1) Confirmation that individual filter monitoring was conducted shall be reported within ten days after the end of each month the public water system serves water to the public.

(2) Public water systems serving a combined population of at least ten thousand shall report individual filter turbidity monitoring results within ten days after the end of each month the public water system serves water to the public only if measurements demonstrate one or more of the following conditions:

(a) For any individual filter that has a measured turbidity level of greater than 1.0 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) in two consecutive measurements taken fifteen minutes apart, the public water system shall report the filter number, the turbidity measurements, and the date and times on which the exceedance occurred. In addition, the public water system shall either produce a filter profile for the filter within seven days of the exceedance and report that the filter profile has been produced or report the obvious reason for the exceedance.

(b) For any individual filter that has a measured turbidity level of greater than 0.5 NTU in two consecutive measurements taken fifteen minutes apart between the end of the first four hours of continuous filter operation after the filter has been backwashed or otherwise taken offline, and at the end of a filter run the public water system shall report the filter number, the turbidity measurements, and that date and times on which the exceedance occurred. In addition, the public water system shall either produce a filter profile for the filter within seven days of the exceedance and report that the profile has been produced or report the obvious reason for the exceedance.

(c) For any individual filter that has a measured turbidity level of greater than 1.0 NTU in two consecutive measurements taken fifteen minutes apart at any time in each of three consecutive months, the public water system shall report the filter number, the turbidity measurements, and the dates and times on which the exceedance occurred. In addition, the public water system shall conduct a self-assessment of the filter within fourteen days of the exceedance and report that the self-assessment was conducted. The self assessment shall consist of at least the following components: assessment of filter performance; development of a filter profile; identification and prioritization of factors limiting filter performance; assessment of the applicability of corrections; and preparation of a filter self-assessment report.

(d) For any individual filter that has a measured turbidity level of greater than 2.0 NTU in two consecutive measurements taken fifteen minutes apart at any time in each of two consecutive months, the public water system shall report the filter number, the turbidity measurements, and the dates and times on which the exceedance occurred. In addition, no later than thirty days following the exceedance, the public water system shall arrange for a comprehensive performance evaluation (CPE) to be conducted by the director. If the director decides not to conduct the CPE, then the CPE shall be conducted by a third party in accordance with procedures acceptable to the director. A report of the evaluation shall be completed and submitted to the director no later than ninety days following the exceedance. The director may require the public water system to correct any or all of the deficiencies noted in the report.

(3) Public water systems serving a combined population of less than ten thousand shall report individual filter turbidity monitoring results within ten days after the end of each month the public water system serves water to the public only if measurements demonstrate one or more of the following conditions:

(a) For any individual filter (or combined filter effluent for systems with two filters that monitor combined filter effluent in lieu of individual filters) that has a measured turbidity level of greater than 1.0 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) in two consecutive measurements taken fifteen minutes apart, the public water system shall report the filter number, the turbidity measurements, and the dates and times on which the exceedance occurred. In addition, the public water system shall report the cause of the exceedance if known.

(b) For any individual filter (or combined filter effluent for systems with two or fewer filters that monitor combined filter effluent in lieu of individual filters) that has a measured turbidity level of greater than 1.0 NTU in two consecutive measurements taken fifteen minutes apart at any time in each of three consecutive months, the public water system shall report the filter number, the turbidity measurements, and the dates and times on which the exceedance occurred. In addition, the public water system shall conduct a self-assessment of the filter (or both filters if the system monitors the combined filter effluent in lieu of individual filters) within fourteen days of the exceedance and report that the self-assessment was conducted unless the requirement to conduct a comprehensive performance evaluation which includes a self-assessment of this filter is required during this time period by paragraph (B)(3)(c) of this rule. The self-assessments shall consist of at least the following components: assessment of filter performance; development of a filter profile; identification and prioritization of factors limiting filter performance; assessment of the applicability of corrections; and preparation of a filter self-assessment report.

(c) For any individual filter (or combined filter effluent for systems with two or fewer filters that monitor combined filter effluent in lieu of individual filters) that has a measured turbidity level of greater than 2.0 NTU in two consecutive measurements taken fifteen minutes apart at any time in each of two consecutive months, the public water system shall report the filter number, the turbidity measurements, and the dates and times on which the exceedance occurred. In addition, no later than sixty days following the exceedance, the public water system shall arrange for a comprehensive performance evaluation (CPE) to be conducted by the director. If the director decides not to conduct the CPE, then the CPE shall be conducted by a third party in accordance with procedures acceptable to the director. A report of the evaluation shall be completed and submitted to the director no later than one hundred twenty days following the exceedance. The director may require the public water system to correct any or all of the deficiencies noted in the report. If a CPE has been completed within twelve months prior to the exceedance or if the director and public water system are jointly participating in an ongoing comprehensive technical assistance (CTA) at the system, the director may not require a new CPE to be conducted.

(4) Recorded results of individual filter turbidity monitoring shall be maintained by the public water system for a minimum of three years.

(C) Disinfection information specified in rule 3745-81-74 of the Administrative Code shall be reported to the director within ten days after the end of each month the public water system serves water to the public. The information reported shall include the following:

(1) For each day, the lowest residual disinfectant concentration in milligrams per liter in water entering the distribution system.

(2) The date and duration of each period when the residual disinfectant concentration in water entering the distribution system fell below 0.2 milligram per liter free chlorine or one milligram per liter combined chlorine and when the director was notified of the occurrence.

(3) The following information on all the residual disinfectant concentration samples taken in the distribution system in conjunction with total coliform monitoring pursuant to rule 3745-81-21 of the Administrative Code:

(a) The number of residual disinfectant concentration samples analyzed for the distribution system;

(b) The number of samples with residual disinfectant concentration determined to be less than 0.2 milligram per liter free chlorine or one milligram per liter combined chlorine; and

(c) The per cent of samples with residual disinfectant concentration of at least 0.2 milligram per liter free chlorine or one milligram per liter combined chlorine.

(4) The CT parameters during peak hourly flow rate for each day, including the temperature, pH, disinfectant, residual disinfectant concentration, disinfectant contact time, actual CT value, required CT value, and the number of days, if any, for which the required CT value is larger than the actual CT value.

(D) Each public water system, upon discovering that a waterborne disease outbreak potentially attributable to that public water system has occurred, shall report that occurrence to the director as soon as possible, but no later than by the end of the next business day.

(E) If at any time the turbidity in representative samples of filtered water in accordance with paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-74 of the Administrative Code exceeds one NTU, for conventional or direct filtration or alternative filtration surface water systems, the public water system shall notify the director as soon as practical, but no later than twenty-four hours after the exceedance is known. For all other surface water systems, if at any time the turbidity in representative samples of filtered water in accordance with paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-74 exceeds five NTU, the public water system shall notify the director as soon as practical, but no later than twenty-four hours after the exceedance is known.

(F) If at any time the residual disinfectant concentration falls below 0.2 milligram per liter free chlorine or one milligram per liter combined chlorine in the water entering the distribution system, the public water system shall notify the director as soon as possible, but no later than by the end of the next business day. The public water system also shall notify the director by the end of the next business day whether or not the residual disinfectant concentration was restored to at least 0.2 milligram per liter free chlorine or one milligram per liter combined chlorine within four hours.

(G) This paragraph is applicable to public water systems that monitor for TTHM, HAA5, bromate, chlorite, chlorine, chloramines, chlorine dioxide, or TOC:

(1) Public water systems monitoring for TTHM and HAA5 under the provisions of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code shall ensure that the analytical results are reported to the director according to the requirements specified in rule 3745-89-08 of the Administrative Code. In order to determine compliance with the sample monitoring plan for total TTHM and HAA5, the sample submission reports shall contain the sample location description. Compliance with the MCLs for TTHM and HAA5 in rule 3745-81-12 of the Administrative Code shall be determined by the director. Exceedance of the operational evaluation level for TTHM and HAA5 in paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code shall be determined by the director.

(2) Public water systems monitoring for bromate under rule 3745-81-23 of the Administrative Code shall report the following:

(a) The number of samples taken during the last quarter .

(b) The location, date, and result of each sample taken during the last quarter .

(c) The arithmetic average of the monthly arithmetic averages of all samples taken in the last year .

(d) Whether the MCL was exceeded.

(3) Public water systems monitoring for chlorite under rule 3745-81-23 of the Administrative Code shall report the following:

(a) The number of entry point samples taken each month for the last three months .

(b) The location, date, and result of each sample (both entry point and distribution) taken during the last quarter .

(c) For each month in the reporting period, the arithmetic average of all samples taken in each three sample sets taken in the distribution system .

(d) Whether the MCL was exceeded, in which month, and how many times it was exceeded each month.

(4) Public water systems monitoring for total chlorine under rule 3745-81-70 of the Administrative Code shall report the following:

(a) The number of samples taken during each month of the last quarter .

(b) The monthly arithmetic average of all samples taken in each month for the last twelve months .

(c) The arithmetic average of the monthly averages for the last twelve months .

(d) Whether the MRDL was exceeded.

(5) Public water systems monitoring for chlorine dioxide under rule 3745-81-70 of the Administrative Code shall report the following:

(a) The dates, results, and locations of samples taken during the last quarter .

(b) Whether the MRDL was exceeded .

(c) Whether the MRDL was exceeded in any two consecutive daily samples and whether the resulting violation was acute or nonacute.

(6) Public water systems monitoring monthly or quarterly for TOC under rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code and required to meet the enhanced coagulation or enhanced softening requirements in rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code shall report the following:

(a) The number of paired (source water and treated water, prior to continuous disinfection) samples taken during the last quarter .

(b) The location, date, and result of each paired sample and associated alkalinity taken during the last quarter .

(c) For each month in the reporting period that paired samples were taken, the arithmetic average of the per cent reduction of TOC for each paired sample and the required TOC per cent removal .

(d) Calculations for determining compliance with the TOC per cent removal requirements, as provided in rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code .

(e) Whether the public water system is in compliance with the enhanced coagulation or enhanced softening per cent removal requirements in rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code for the last four quarters.

(7) Public water systems monitoring monthly or quarterly for TOC under rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code and meeting one or more of the alternative compliance criteria in rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code shall report the following:

(a) The alternative compliance criterion that the system is using .

(b) The number of paired samples taken during the last quarter .

(c) The location, date, and result of each paired sample and associated alkalinity taken during the last quarter .

(d) The running annual arithmetic average based on monthly averages (or quarterly samples) of source water TOC for public water systems meeting a criterion in paragraph (D)(1) or (D)(3) of rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code or of treated water TOC for public water systems meeting the criterion in paragraph (D)(2) of rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code .

(e) The running annual arithmetic average based on monthly averages (or quarterly samples) of source water SUVA for public water systems meeting the criterion in paragraph (D)(6) of rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code or of treated water SUVA for public water systems meeting the criterion in paragraph (D)(7) of rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code .

(f) The running annual average of source water alkalinity for public water systems meeting the criterion in paragraph (D)(3) of rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code and of treated water alkalinity for public water systems meeting the criterion in paragraph (E)(1) of rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code .

(g) The running annual average for both TTHM and HAA5 for public water systems meeting the criterion in paragraph (D)(3) or (D)(5) of rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code .

(h) The running annual average of the amount of magnesium hardness removal (as CaCO 3 , in mg/l) for public water systems meeting the criterion in paragraph (E)(2) of rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code .

(i) Whether the public water system is in compliance with the particular alternative compliance criterion in rule 3745-81-77 of the Administrative Code.

Effective: 10/05/2013
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/16/2013 and 10/05/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/31/90, 01/01/02, 01/01/05, 01/01/10

3745-81-76 Water source designation.

(A) Source water which is open to the atmosphere or subject to surface runoff is designated as surface water. Surface water sources include streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, reservoirs, springs, roof collection and impoundments.

(B) Source water which is obtained from a well is designated as ground water unless the director designates the source as surface water.

(C) The director may designate a well as surface water based on information available in Ohio environmental protection agency files about the water source and the water produced from the source, information from on-site sanitary or geological surveys, information supplied by the public water system upon a request from the director, any additional information which becomes available, and the guidelines outlined in the following paragraphs. A public water system shall provide information requested by the director within six months of receipt of a written request. Information requested for each water source may concern water quality, well construction and location, geological information, particulate analysis, Cryptosporidium analysis, Giardia lamblia analysis, E.coli analysis, ground water source samples related to rules 3745-81-41 to 3745-81-43 of the Administrative Code, and other information related to designation of the water source. A well may be designated as surface water if it meets any of the following criteria:

(1) The well does not meet all of the requirements for wells in Chapter 3745-9 of the Administrative Code;

(2) The well obtains water from a site at which rapid pathways or compromised hydrogeologic barriers have been identified; or

(3) If required by the director, analysis shows the annual mean E. coli concentration is greater than or equal to ten E. coli per one hundred milliliters.

(D) The director shall at a minimum consider the following criteria in making a surface water designation for a well:

(1) A well does not meet all of the requirements for wells in Chapter 3745-9 of the Administrative Code;

(2) A well obtains water from a site at which rapid pathways or compromised hydrogeologic barriers have been identified;

(3) A well is cased less than fifteen feet in depth;

(4) A vertical well where the sum of the casing depth plus the horizontal distance to a normal surface water pool is less than forty feet;

(5) A horizontal collector well lateral or infiltration gallery collector pipe less than twenty-five feet below the ground surface;

(6) A horizontal collector well where the sum of the depth of any lateral below grade or stream, lake, reservoir bed plus the horizontal distance measured at the end of any lateral to a normal surface water pool is less than fifty feet; or

(7) An annual mean E. coli concentration equal to or more than ten E.coli colonies per one hundred milliliters based on monitoring of the source.

(E) Assessment source water monitoring as described in paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-42 of the Administrative Code shall be completed for the source when one of the following conditions exist:

(1) A well is cased between fifteen and twenty-five feet in depth;

(2) A well is located less than fifty feet from a normal water surface;

(3) Infiltration galleries, recharge lagoons or other basins constructed to increase the rate of infiltration are used;

(4) A horizontal collector which meets the criteria in paragraph (D)(5) or (D)(6) of this rule;

(5) Any potential for surface water contamination exists within the approved isolation radius, including but not limited to improperly abandoned wells, leach beds, sanitary or combined sewers, or septic tanks;

(6) Gravity sewers built to water line standards and pressure tested are closer than one third the usually required isolation or if there are manholes on these pressure tested lines within the isolation area;

(7) A well is located in bedrock where the bedrock may be directly connected to surface water such as through fractures or solution features;

(8) A waterborne disease outbreak has been associated with the well; or

(9) Other surface water contamination hazards exist.

(F) Designation of a public water system's water sources as including surface water shall bring this public water system under the requirements of rules 3745-81-64 to 3745-81-69 and 3745-81-71 to 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code.

(G) Designation of a public water system's water sources as including ground water shall bring this public water system under the requirements of rules 3745-81-41 to 3745-81-45 of the Administrative Code, unless all of the ground water is combined with surface water prior to treatment under rule 3745-81-71 of the Administrative Code.

(H) The director may redesignate a water source as surface water or as ground water at any time that additional information indicates that redesignation is appropriate.

Replaces: 3745-81-76

Effective: 08/01/2014
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/01/2019
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 12/31/90, 01/01/02, 01/08/10, 10/31/10

3745-81-77 Treatment techniques for control of disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors.

(A) Surface water community and nontransient noncommunity public water systems using conventional filtration treatment shall operate with enhanced coagulation or enhanced softening to achieve the TOC per cent removal levels specified in paragraph (F) of this rule unless the system meets at least one of the alternative compliance criteria listed in paragraph (D) or (E) of this rule.

(B) Surface water systems using conventional filtration treatment shall comply with the following monitoring requirements for disinfection byproduct precursors (DBPP).

(1) Routine monthly monitoring: public water systems using surface water as a source which use conventional filtration treatment shall monitor each treatment plant for TOC no later than the point of combined filter effluent turbidity monitoring and representative of the treated water. All public water systems required to monitor under this paragraph shall also monitor for TOC in the source water prior to any treatment at the same time as monitoring for TOC in the treated water. These samples (source water and treated water) are referred to as paired samples. At the same time as the source water sample is taken, all systems shall monitor for alkalinity in the source water prior to any treatment. Public water systems shall take one paired sample and one source water alkalinity sample every thirty days per plant at a time representative of normal operating conditions and influent water quality. The thirty day monitoring frequency may be extended or reduced by three days to allow for unplanned circumstances that prevent monitoring precisely thirty days apart, as long as the samples are collected during each calendar month.

(2) Reduced quarterly monitoring: public water systems using surface water as a source with an average treated water TOC of less than 2.0 mg/l for two consecutive years, or less than 1.0 mg/l for one year, may reduce monitoring for both TOC and alkalinity to one paired sample and one source water alkalinity sample per plant every ninety days. The ninety day monitoring frequency may be extended or reduced by five days to allow for unplanned circumstances that prevent monitoring precisely ninety days apart, as long as the samples are collected during each calendar quarter. The public water system must revert to routine monitoring in the month following the quarter when the running annual average treated water TOC >2.0 mg/l.

(C) Public water systems may begin monitoring twelve months prior to the compliance date for the system, to determine whether step 1 TOC removals can be met. This monitoring is not required and failure to monitor during this period is not a violation. However, any public water system that does not monitor during this period, and then determines in the first twelve months after the compliance date that it is not able to meet the step 1 requirements in paragraph (F)(2) of this rule and must apply for alternate minimum TOC removal (step 2) requirements, is not eligible for retroactive approval of alternate minimum TOC removal (step 2) requirements as allowed by paragraph (F)(3) of this rule and is in violation of the treatment technique for TOC removal of this rule. Public water systems may apply for alternate minimum TOC removal (step 2) requirements any time after the compliance date.

(D) Alternative compliance criteria for enhanced coagulation and enhanced softening systems. Surface water systems using conventional filtration treatment may use one or more of the alternative compliance criteria in paragraphs (D)(1) to (D)(7) of this rule to comply with this rule in lieu of complying with paragraph (F) of this rule. Public water systems must still comply with the monitoring requirements of paragraph (B) of this rule.

(1) The system's source water TOC level, measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, is less than 2.0 mg/l, calculated quarterly as a running annual average.

(2) The system's treated water TOC level, measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, is less than 2.0 mg/l, calculated quarterly as a running annual average.

(3) The system's source water TOC level, measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, is less than 4.0 mg/l, calculated quarterly as a running annual average; the source water alkalinity, measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code , is greater than 60.0 mg/l (as CaCO3), calculated quarterly as a running annual average and the TTHM and HAA5 running annual averages are no greater than 0.040 mg/l and 0.030 mg/l, respectively.

(4) The system's source water TOC level, measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, is less than 4.0 mg/l, calculated quarterly as a running annual average; the source water alkalinity, measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, is greater than 60.0 mg/l (as CaCO3), calculated quarterly as a running annual average and the system has made a clear and irrevocable financial commitment to use technologies that will limit the levels of TTHMs and HAA5 to no more than 0.040 mg/l and 0.030 mg/l, respectively. Systems must submit evidence of a clear and irrevocable financial commitment, in addition to a schedule containing milestones and periodic progress reports for installation and operation of appropriate technologies, to the director for approval. Failure to install and operate these technologies by the date in the approved schedule will constitute a violation of the Administrative Code primary drinking water regulations for control of disinfection byproduct precursors.

(5) The TTHM and HAA5 running annual averages are no greater than 0.040 mg/l and 0.030 mg/l, respectively, and the system uses only chlorine for primary disinfection and maintenance of a residual in the distribution system.

(6) The system's source water SUVA, prior to any treatment and measured monthly according to of rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, is less than or equal to 2.0 l/mg-m, calculated quarterly as a running annual average.

(7) The system's finished water SUVA, measured monthly according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, is less than or equal to 2.0 l/mg-m, calculated quarterly as a running annual average.

(E) Additional alternative compliance criteria for softening systems. Systems practicing enhanced softening that cannot achieve the TOC removals required by paragraph (F)(2) of this rule may use the alternative compliance criteria in paragraph (E)(1) or (E)(2) of this rule in lieu of complying with paragraph (F) of this rule. Systems must still comply with monitoring requirements in paragraph (B) of this rule.

(1) Softening that results in lowering the treated water alkalinity to less than 60.0 mg/l (as CaCO3), measured monthly according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code and calculated quarterly as a running annual average.

(2) Softening that results in removing at least 10.0 mg/l of magnesium hardness (as CaCO3), measured monthly according to paragraph (C)(4)(c) of rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code and calculated quarterly as an annual running average.

(F) Enhanced coagulation and enhanced softening performance requirements.

(1) Public water systems must achieve the per cent reduction of TOC specified in paragraph (F)(2) of this rule between the source water and the combined filter effluent, unless the director approves a system's request for alternate minimum TOC removal (step 2) requirements under paragraph (F)(3) of this rule.

(2) Required step 1 TOC reductions, indicated in the following table, are based upon specified source water parameters measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code. Systems practicing softening are required to meet the step 1 TOC reductions in the far-right column(source water alkalinity >120 mg/l) for the specified source water TOC:

Step 1 required removal of TOC by enhanced coagulation and enhanced softening for surface water systems using conventional treatment1,2

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-77_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(3) Surface water conventional treatment systems that cannot achieve the step 1 TOC removals required by paragraph (F)(2) of this rule due to water quality parameters or operational constraints shall apply to the director, within three months of failure to achieve the TOC removals required by paragraph (F)(2) of this rule, for approval of alternative minimum TOC removal (step 2) requirements submitted by the system. If the director approves the alternative minimum TOC removal (step 2) requirements, the director may make those requirements retroactive for the purposes of determining compliance. Until the director approves the alternate minimum TOC removal (step 2) requirements, the system must meet the step 1 TOC removals contained in paragraph (F)(2) of this rule.

(4) Alternate minimum TOC removal (step 2) requirements. Applications made to the director by enhanced coagulation systems for approval of alternative minimum TOC removal (step 2) requirements under paragraph (F)(3) of this rule shall include, at a minimum, results of bench- or pilot-scale testing conducted under paragraphs (F)(6) to (F)(9) of this rule. The submitted bench- or pilot-scale testing shall be used to determine the alternate enhanced coagulation level.

(5) Alternate enhanced coagulation level is defined as coagulation at a coagulant dose and pH as determined by the method described in paragraphs (F)(6) to (F)(9) of this rule such that an incremental addition of 10.0 mg/l of alum (or equivalent amount of ferric salt) results in a TOC removal of <0.3 mg/l. The per cent removal of TOC at this point on the "TOC removal versus coagulant dose" curve is then defined as the minimum TOC removal required for the system. Once approved by the director, this minimum requirement supersedes the minimum TOC removal required by the table in paragraph (F)(2) of this rule. This requirement will be effective until such time as the director approves a new value based on the results of a new bench- or pilot-scale test. Failure to achieve alternative minimum TOC removal levels as set by the director is a violation of the Administrative Code primary drinking water regulations for control of disinfection byproduct precursors.

(6) Bench- or pilot-scale testing of enhanced coagulation must be conducted by using representative water samples and adding 10.0 mg/l increments of alum (or equivalent amounts of ferric salt) until the pH is reduced to a level less than or equal to the enhanced coagulation step 2 target pH shown in the following table:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-77_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(7) For waters with alkalinities of less than 60.0 mg/l for which addition of small amounts of alum or equivalent addition of iron coagulant drives the pH below 5.5 before significant TOC removal occurs, the system must add necessary chemicals to maintain the pH between 5.3 and 5.7 in samples until the TOC removal of 0.3 mg/l per 10.0 mg/l alum added (or equivalent addition of iron coagulant) is reached.

(8) The system may operate at any coagulant dose or pH necessary (consistent with other state primary drinking water regulations) to achieve the minimum TOC per cent removal approved under paragraph (F)(3) of this rule.

(9) If the TOC removal is consistently less than 0.3 mg/l of TOC per 10.0 mg/l of incremental alum dose at all dosages of alum (or equivalent addition of iron coagulant), the water is deemed to contain TOC not amenable to enhanced coagulation. The system may then apply to the director for a waiver of enhanced coagulation requirements.

(G) Compliance calculations: surface water systems other than those identified in paragraph (D) or (E) of this rule shall comply with requirements contained in paragraph (F)(2) or (F)(3) of this rule. Systems shall calculate compliance quarterly, beginning after the system has collected twelve months of data, by determining a running annual average using the following method:

(1) Determine actual monthly TOC per cent removal. This is equal to: ( 1.0 - (treated water TOC/source water TOC)) x 100.0.

(2) Determine the required monthly TOC per cent removal (from either the table in paragraph (F)(2) of this rule or from paragraph (F)(3) of this rule).

(3) Divide the value determined according to paragraph (G)(1) of this rule by the value determined according to paragraph (G)(2) of this rule.

(4) Add together the results of paragraph (G)(3) of this rule for the last twelve months and divide by twelve.

(5) If the value calculated in paragraph (G)(4) of this rule is less than 1.00, the system is not in compliance with the TOC per cent removal requirements.

(6) Systems may use the provisions in paragraphs (G)(7) to (G)(11) of this rule in lieu of the calculations in paragraphs (G)(1) to (G)(5) of this rule to determine compliance with TOC per cent removal requirements.

(7) In any month that the system's treated or source water TOC level, measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, is less than 2.0 mg/l, the system may assign a monthly value of 1.0 (in lieu of the value calculated in paragraph (G)(3) of this rule).

(8) In any month that a system practicing softening removes at least 10.0 mg/l of magnesium hardness (as CaCO3), the system may assign a monthly value of 1.0 (in lieu of the value calculated in paragraph (G)(3) of this rule).

(9) In any month that the system's source water SUVA, prior to any treatment and measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, is<2.0 l/mg-m, the system may assign a monthly value of 1.0 (in lieu of the value calculated in paragraph (G)(3) of this rule).

(10) In any month that the system's finished water SUVA, measured according to rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code , is<2.0 l/mg-m, the system may assign a monthly value of 1.0 (in lieu of the value calculated in paragraph (G)(3) of this rule).

(11) In any month that a system practicing enhanced softening lowers alkalinity below 60.0 mg/l (as CaCO3), the system may assign a monthly value of 1.0 (in lieu of the value calculated in paragraph (G)(3) of this rule).

(12) Surface water systems using conventional treatment may also comply with the requirements of this rule by meeting the criteria in paragraph (D) or (E) of this rule.

(H) Treatment technique requirements for DBP precursors. The director identifies the following as treatment techniques to control the level of disinfection byproduct precursors in drinking water treatment and distribution systems: for surface water systems using conventional treatment, enhanced coagulation or enhanced softening.

(I) Each public water system required to monitor under this rule shall develop and implement a monitoring plan. The public water system shall maintain the plan and make it available for inspection by the director and the general public no later than thirty days following the applicable compliance dates in this rule. All surface water systems serving more than three thousand three hundred people shall submit a copy of the monitoring plan to the director no later than the date of the first report required under paragraph (G) of rule 3745-81-75 of the Administrative Code. The director may also require any other public water system to submit such a plan. After review, the director may require changes in any plan elements to ensure monitoring will be adequate for required compliance determinations. The public water system shall modify the plan as required by the director. The plan shall include how the public water system will calculate compliance with the treatment technique for disinfection byproduct precursors. Failure to sample according to the monitoring plans is monitoring violation.

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/18/2009 and 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 01/01/02, 01/01/04

3745-81-78 Optimization of distribution systems for control of disinfection by-products.

(A) Applicability. All consecutive community public water systems that receive water from public water systems that use sources of water designated as surface water according to rule 3745-81-76 of the Administrative Code and distribute water that has been treated with any combination of chlorine, chloramines, chlorine dioxide and/or ozone but do not treat their water with any of these chemicals shall monitor for TTHM and HAA5 according to this rule. Beginning on the applicable compliance date identified in paragraph (D)(1) of rule 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code, these systems will no longer have to comply with this rule and shall comply with rules 3745-81-12 and 3745-81-24 of the Administrative Code.

(B) Definition. For purposes of this rule, optimization of distribution system operation is defined as:

(1) Reduction of TTHM to below 0.080 mg/l and HAA5 to below 0.060 mg/l as a running annual average as determined according to paragraph (E) of this rule;

(2) A significant reduction in the running annual averages of TTHM and HAA5. The reduction shall be determined by comparing the running annual averages from the first four quarters of monitoring to running annual averages determined by subsequent monitoring conducted according to this rule; or

(3) Demonstration of the implementation of an approved optimization plan.

(C) Monitoring requirements.

(1) Monitoring required by this rule shall be done using analytical procedures listed in rule 3745-81-27 of the Administrative Code, which are acceptable for monitoring TTHM and HAA5, and analyzed by laboratories certified to perform such analyses according to rule 3745-89-03 of the Administrative Code.

(2) Routine monitoring: public water systems specified in paragraph (A) of this rule shall conduct routine monitoring for TTHM and HAA5 according to the following table:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-78_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(3) Reduced monitoring. Public water systems specified in paragraph (A)(2) of this rule may reduce monitoring according to the following table:

See Table at

http://www.registerofohio.state.oh.us/pdfs/3745/0/81/3745-81-78_PH_FF_A_RU_20091204_0807.pdf

(a) Public water systems on a reduced monitoring schedule may remain on that reduced schedule as long as the average of all samples taken in the year (for public water systems which must monitor quarterly) or the result of the sample (for public water systems which must monitor no more frequently than annually) is no more than 0.060 mg/l and 0.045 mg/l for TTHMs and HAA5, respectively. Public water systems that do not meet these levels shall resume monitoring at the frequency identified in paragraph (C)(1) of this rule (routine monitoring) in the quarter immediately following the quarter in which the public water system exceeds either 0.060 mg/l and 0.045 mg/l for TTHM and HAA5, respectively.

(b) The director may return a public water system to routine monitoring at the director's discretion.

(c) All samples taken and analyzed under the provisions of this rule must be included in determining compliance with the annual running average for TTHMs and HAA5, even if that number is greater than the minimum required.

(4) Public water systems shall take all samples during normal operating conditions. For each quarterly interval, all samples for each public water system shall be collected within a twenty-four hour period. This requirement may be waived in the event of any unforseen, temporary or uncontrollable circumstances. Failure to monitor according to this rule is a monitoring violation.

(D) Reporting requirements. Public water systems monitoring for TTHM and HAA5 according to this rule shall ensure that the analytical results are reported to the director according to the requirements specified in rules 3745-89-08 and 3745-81-61 of the Administrative Code.

(E) For TTHMs and HAA5 the director will calculate a running annual arithmetic average, computed quarterly, of quarterly arithmetic averages of all samples collected by the public water system as prescribed by paragraph (C) of this rule.

(F) Trigger for optimization. The requirements of paragraph (G) of this rule apply to those public water systems described in paragraph (A)(1) of this rule. If the running annual arithmetic average of quarterly averages covering any consecutive four-quarter period exceeds 0.080 mg/l for TTHMs or 0.060 mg/l for HAA5, public water systems shall operate their distribution system in a manner that will minimize the level of TTHM and HAA5 present in the system by optimizing operation of their distribution systems.

(G) Optimization requirements.

(1) Water systems that are required to optimize their distribution systems by paragraph (F) of this rule shall do so according to a written plan submitted to the director. The plan shall be submitted within six months of exceeding the levels specified in paragraph (F) of this rule. Water systems shall complete distribution optimization as soon as practical, but no later than thirty-six months following the date of exceeding the level specified in paragraph (F) of this rule. Failure to optimize according to this rule is a treatment technique violation.

(2) Plans for optimizing a distribution system shall include but not be limited to the following.

(a) Optimal replacement of water in storage tanks. Replacement of at least twenty-five per cent of water is recommended on a daily basis;

(b) Calculations or modeling to determine water age, identification of deficiencies in the distribution system, an evaluation of options for improvements and corrections, and consultation with the director on the feasibility of implementing the improvements and corrections. Improvements and corrections considered may include the installation of additional water lines, looping and modifying flow through adjustment of valves;

(c) Planned flushing program;

(d) If multiple water sources are used, varying the source or percentage of the source used based on the potential to form disinfection byproducts; and

(e) A schedule indicating when operational improvements and capital improvements will be completed.

(H) The director shall review and approve the written distribution optimization plan.

Effective: 01/01/2010
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/18/2009 and 01/01/2015
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 01/01/02, 01/01/04

3745-81-79 Filter backwash recycling.

A surface water system that uses conventional filtration treatment or direct filtration treatment and that recycles spent filter backwash water, thickener supernatant, or liquid from a dewatering process shall meet the following:

(A) Surface water systems shall notify the director in writing if spent filter backwash water, thickener supernatant, or liquid from a dewatering process is recycled prior to initiation of recycling if the notification requirements of this paragraph have not been completed previously. This notification must include at least the following information:

(1) A plant schematic showing the origin of all flows which are recycled that may include, but are not limited to:

(a) Spent filter backwash water .

(b) Thickener supernatant .

(c) Liquid from a dewatering process .

(d) Filter to waste .

(e) The hydraulic conveyance used to transport them .

(f) The location where they are mixed in the water treatment process .

(2) The typical recycle flow, the highest observed plant flow during the previous twelve months and the state approved design capacity. All flows shall be reported in gallons per minute.

(B) Surface water systems which recycle spent filter backwash water, thickener supernatant, or a liquid from a dewatering process shall return these flows through the existing conventional filtration treatment or direct filtration treatment, or through an alternative location that is approved by the director. Failure to comply with this paragraph is a treatment technique violation.

(C) Surface water systems which recycle spent filter backwash water, thickner supernatant, or liquid from a dewatering process shall collect and retain on file the following recycle flow information for review and evaluation:

(1) A copy of the recycle notification and information that was submitted to the director in accordance to paragraph (A)(1) of this rule:

(2) A list of all recycle flows and the frequency with which they are returned .

(3) The average and maximum backwash flow rates through the filters and the average and maximum durations of the filter backwash in minutes .

(4) The typical filter run length and a written summary of how filter run length is determined .

(5) The type of treatment provided for the recycle flow .

(6) Data on the physical dimensions of the equilization and treatment units, typical and maximum hydraulic loading rates, type of treatment chemicals used and average dose and frequency of use, and, if applicable, frequency that solids are removed.

Effective: 10/05/2013
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/16/2013 and 10/05/2018
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.03 , 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 08/03/04

3745-81-80 Control of lead and copper - general requirements.

(A) Applicability. The requirements of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code are based on the national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. Unless otherwise indicated, each of the provisions of these rules applies to community water systems and non-transient non-community water systems(hereinafter referred to as "water systems" or "systems").

(B) Scope. These regulations establish a treatment technique that includes requirements for corrosion control treatment, source water treatment, lead service line replacement, and public education. Lead and copper action levels, measured in samples collected at consumers' taps, may trigger these requirements.

(C) Lead and copper action levels.

(1) The lead action level is exceeded if the concentration of lead in more than ten per cent of tap water samples collected during any monitoring period conducted in accordance with rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code is greater than 0.015 milligram per liter, i.e., if the"ninetieth percentile" lead level is greater than 0.015 milligram per liter.

(2) The copper action level is exceeded if the concentration of copper in more than ten percent of tap water samples collected during any monitoring period conducted in accordance with rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code is greater than 1.3 milligrams per liter, i.e., if the"ninetieth percentile" copper level is greater than 1.3 milligrams per liter.

(3) The ninetieth percentile lead and copper levels shall be computed as follows:

(a) The analytical results of all lead or copper samples taken during a monitoring period shall be placed in ascending order from the sample with the lowest concentration to the sample with the highest concentration. Each analytical result shall be assigned a consecutive whole number, beginning with the number one for the sample with the lowest contaminant level. The number assigned to the sample with the highest contaminant level shall be that of the total number of samples analyzed.

(b) The number of samples taken during the monitoring period shall be multiplied by 0.9.

(c) The contaminant concentration in the numbered sample with the number yielded by the calculation in paragraph (C)(3)(b) of this rule is the ninetieth percentile contaminant level.

(d) For public water systems that monitor five samples per monitoring period, the ninetieth percentile is computed by taking the average for the two samples with highest concentrations.

(e) For public water systems that have been allowed by the director to collect fewer than five samples under rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code, the sample result with the highest concentration is considered the ninetieth percentile value.

(D) Corrosion control treatment requirements.

(1) All water systems shall install and operate optimal corrosion control treatment as defined in rule 3745-81-01 of the Administrative Code.

(2) Any water system that complies with the applicable corrosion control treatment requirements approved by the director under rules 3745-81-81 and 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code shall be deemed in compliance with the treatment requirement contained in paragraph (D)(1) of this rule.

(E) Source water treatment requirements. Any system exceeding the lead or copper action level shall implement all applicable source water treatment requirements specified by the director under rule 3745-81-83 of the Administrative Code.

(F) Lead service line replacement requirements. Any system exceeding the lead action level after implementation of applicable corrosion control and source water treatment requirements shall complete the lead service line replacement requirements contained in rule 3745-81-84 of the Administrative Code.

(G) Consumer notification and public education requirements.

(1) Consumer notification. Pursuant to paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-85 of the Administrative Code, all public water systems shall provide a consumer notice of lead tap water monitoring results to persons served at the sites(taps) that are sampled.

(2) Public education. Any system exceeding the lead action level shall implement the public education requirements contained in rule 3745-81-85 of the Administrative Code.

(H) Monitoring and analytical requirements. Monitoring of tap water for lead and copper, monitoring for water quality parameters, monitoring of source water at seach entry point to the distribution system for lead and copper, and analyses of these monitoring samples shall be completed in compliance with rules 3745-81-86 to 3745-81-89 of the Administrative Code and Chapter 3745-89(laboratory approval) of the Administrative Code.

(I) Reporting requirements. Public water systems shall report to the director any information required by the treatment provisions of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code.

(J) Recordkeeping requirements. Public water systems shall maintain records in accordance with rule 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code.

(K) Violation of primary drinking water regulations. Failure to comply with the applicable requirements of rules 3745-81-80 to 3745-81-90 of the Administrative Code, including requirements established by the director pursuant to these provisions, shall constitute a violation of the Administrative Code primary drinking water regulations for lead and/or copper.

R.C. 119.032 review dates: 04/24/2014 and 04/24/2019
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 9/13/93, 10/17/03

3745-81-81 Control of lead and copper; applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium, and large water systems.

(A) Public water systems shall complete the applicable corrosion control treatment requirements described in rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code by the deadlines established in this rule.

(1) A large system (serving more than fifty thousand persons) shall complete the corrosion control treatment steps specified in paragraph (D) of this rule, unless it is deemed to have optimized corrosion control under paragraph (B)(2) or (B)(3) of this rule.

(2) A small system (serving less than or equal to three thousand three hundred persons) and a medium system (serving more than three thousand three hundred and less than or equal to fifty thousand persons) shall complete the corrosion control treatment steps specified in paragraph (E) of this rule, unless it is deemed to have optimized corrosion control under paragraph (B)(1), (B)(2), or (B)(3) of this rule.

(B) A public water system is deemed to have optimized corrosion control and is not required to complete the applicable corrosion control treatment steps identified in this rule if the system satisfies one of the criteria specified in paragraphs (B)(1) to (B)(3) of this rule. Any such system deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph, and which has treatment in place, shall continue to operate and maintain optimal corrosion control treatment and meet any requirements that the director determines appropriate to ensure optimal corrosion control treatment is maintained.

(1) A small or medium water system is deemed to have optimized corrosion control if during each of two consecutive six-month monitoring periods conducted in accordance with rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code the system does not exceed the lead or copper action levels.

(2) Any public water system may be deemed by the director to have optimized corrosion control treatment if the system demonstrates to the satisfaction of the director that it has conducted activities equivalent to the corrosion control steps applicable to such system under this rule. If the director makes this determination, the director shall provide the system with written notice explaining the basis for the director's decision and shall specify the water quality control parameters representing optimal corrosion control in accordance with paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code. Water systems deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph shall operate in compliance with the designated optimal water quality control parameters in accordance with paragraph (G) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code and continue to conduct lead and copper tap and water quality parameter sampling in accordance with paragraph (D)(3) of rule 3745-81-86 and paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code, respectively. A system shall provide the director with the following information in order to support a determination under this paragraph:

(a) The results of all test samples collected for each of the water quality parameters in paragraph (C)(3) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code;

(b) A report explaining the test methods used by the water system to evaluate the corrosion control treatments listed in paragraph (C)(1) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code, the results of all tests conducted, and the basis for the system's selection of optimal corrosion control treatment;

(c) A report explaining how corrosion control has been installed and how it is being maintained to insure minimal lead and copper concentrations at consumers' taps; and

(d) The results of tap water monitoring with samples collected in accordance with rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code at least once every six months for one year after corrosion control has been installed.

(3) Any water system is deemed to have optimized corrosion control if, for two consecutive six-month monitoring periods, the difference between the ninetieth percentile tap water level computed under paragraph (C)(3) of rule 3745-81-80 of the Administrative Code and the highest source water at the entry point to the distribution system lead concentration is less than the practical quantitation level(PQL) of 0.005 milligrams per liter. Monitoring shall be conducted in accordance with rules 3745-81-86 and 3745-81-88 of the Administrative Code.

(a) Those systems whose highest source water at the entry point to the distribution system lead level is below the method detection limit (MDL) may also be deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph if the ninetieth percentile tap water lead level is less than or equal to the PQL of 0.005 milligram per liter for two consecutive six-month monitoring periods.

(b) Any water system deemed to have optimized corrosion control in accordance with this paragraph shall continue monitoring for lead and copper at the tap no less frequently than once every three calendar years using the reduced number of sites specified in paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code and collecting the samples at times and locations specified in paragraph (D)(4)(d) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code.

(c) Any water system deemed to have optimized corrosion control in accordance with this paragraph shall notify the director in writing of any change or modification in treatment or the addition of a new source in accordance with paragraph (A)(3) of rule 3745-81-90.Thedirectorshallreview and approve the addition of a new source or substantial change in treatment before it is implemented by the water system. The director may require any such water system to conduct additional monitoring or to take other action the director deems appropriate to ensure that minimal levels of corrosion in the distribution system are maintained.

(d) As of the effective date of this rule, a system is not deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph, and shall implement corrosion control treatment pursuant to paragraph (B)(3)(e) of this rule unless it meets the copper action level.

(e) Any system triggered into corrosion control because it is no longer deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph shall implement corrosion control treatment in accordance with the deadlines in paragraph (E) of this rule. Any such large system shall adhere to the schedule specified in that paragraph for medium systems, with the time periods for completing each step being triggered by the date the system is no longer deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph.

(C) Any small or medium water system that is required to complete the corrosion control steps due to exceeding the lead or copper action level may cease completing the treatment steps whenever both action levels are no longer exceeded by the public water system during each of two consecutive monitoring periods conducted pursuant to rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code and the system submits the results to the director. If any such water system thereafter exceeds the lead or copper action level during any monitoring period, the system(or the director, as the case may be) shall recommence completion of the applicable treatment steps, beginning with the first treatment step which was not previously completed in its entirety. The director may require a system to repeat treatment steps previously completed where the director determines that this is necessary to implement properly the treatment requirements of this rule. The director shall notify the system in writing of such a determination and explain the basis for the decision. The requirement for any small or medium water system to implement corrosion control treatment steps in accordance with paragraph (E) of this rule (including systems deemed to have optimized corrosion control under paragraph (B)(1) of this rule) is triggered whenever monitoring exceeds the lead or copper action level.

(D) Treatment steps for large systems. Except as provided in paragraphs (B)(2) and (B)(3) of this rule, large systems shall complete the following corrosion control treatment steps (described in the referenced portions of rules 3745-81-82 , 3745-81-86 , and 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code).

(1) Step one: The system shall conduct initial monitoring (in accordance with paragraph (D)(1) of rule 3745-81-86 and paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code) during two consecutive six-month monitoring periods.

(2) Step two: The system shall complete corrosion control studies (in accordance with paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code).

(3) Step three: The director shall complete the review and approval of optimal corrosion control treatment plans (in accordance with paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code).

(4) Step four: The system shall install optimal corrosion control treatment (in accordance with paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code).

(5) Step five: The system shall complete follow-up monitoring (in accordance with paragraph (D)(2) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code and paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code).

(6) Step six: The director shall review installation of treatment and specify optimal water quality parameters (in accordance with paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code).

(7) Step seven: The system shall operate in compliance with the director-specified optimal water quality control parameters (in accordance with paragraph (G) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code) and continue to conduct tap sampling (in accordance with paragraph (D)(3) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code and paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code).

(E) Treatment steps and deadlines for small and medium systems. Except as provided in paragraph (B) of this rule, small and medium systems shall complete the following corrosion control treatment steps (described in the referenced portions of rules 3745-81-82 , 3745-81-86 , and 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code) within the indicated time periods.

(1) Step one: The system shall conduct initial tap monitoring (in accordance with paragraph (D)(1) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code and paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code) until the system either exceeds the lead or copper action level or becomes eligible for reduced monitoring under paragraph (D)(4) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code.

(a) A small system exceeding the lead or copper action level shall recommend optimal corrosion control treatment (in accordance with paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code), and submit plans therefor if required by Chapter 3745-91 of the Administrative Code, within six months after the end of the monitoring period during which it exceeds one of the action levels.

(b) A medium system exceeding the lead or copper action level shall proceed to step two, paragraph (E)(2) of this rule, requiring corrosion control studies (in accordance with paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code).

(2) Step two: Within twelve months after the end of the monitoring period during which a small system exceeds the lead or copper action level, the director may require the system to perform corrosion control studies (in accordance with paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code). If the director does not require the small system to perform such studies, the director shall complete the review and approval of optimal corrosion control treatment plans (in accordance with paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code) within twenty-four months after the end of the monitoring period during which the system exceeds the lead or copper action level.

Any medium system exceeding the lead or copper action level is required to perform corrosion control studies (in accordance with paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code).

(3) Step three: When the director requires a system to perform corrosion control studies under step two, the system shall complete the studies and submit approvable plans for optimum corrosion control treatment (in accordance with paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code) within eighteen months after the director requires that such studies be conducted.

(4) Step four: If the system has performed corrosion control studies under step two, the director shall complete the review and approval of optimal corrosion control treatment plans (in accordance with paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code) within six months after completion of step three.

(5) Step five: The system shall install optimal corrosion control treatment (in accordance with paragraph (E) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code) within twenty-four months after the director approves plans therefor.

(6) Step six: The system shall complete follow-up monitoring (in accordance with paragraphs (D)(2) of rule 3745-81-86 and (C) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code) within thirty-six months after the director approves optimal corrosion control treatment plans.

(7) Step seven: The director shall review the system's installation of treatment and specify optimal water quality control parameters (in accordance with paragraph (F) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code) within six months after completion of step six.

(8) Step eight: The system shall operate in compliance with the director-specified optimal water quality control parameters (in accordance with paragraph (G) of rule 3745-81-82 of the Administrative Code) and continue to conduct tap sampling (in accordance with paragraphs (D)(3) of rule 3745-81-86 and (D) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code).

Effective: 07/24/2009
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 04/20/2009 and 07/24/2014
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 04/01/96, 10/17/03

3745-81-82 Control of lead and copper; description of corrosion control treatment requirements.

Each public water system shall complete the corrosion control treatment requirements described below which are applicable to such system under rule 3745-81-81 of the Administrative Code.

(A) Small public water system recommendation regarding corrosion control treatment. Based upon the results of lead and copper tap monitoring and water quality parameter monitoring, small water systems exceeding the lead or copper action level shall recommend installation of and submit plans for one or more of the corrosion control treatments listed in paragraph (C)(1) of this rule which the system believes constitute optimal corrosion control for that system. The director may require the small system to conduct additional water quality parameter monitoring in accordance with paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code to assist the director in reviewing the system's recommendation.

(B) Studies of corrosion control treatment by small and medium systems. The director may require any small system that exceeds the lead or copper action level to perform corrosion control studies under paragraph (C) of this rule to identify optimal corrosion control treatment for the system. Any medium system that exceeds the lead or copper action level shall perform corrosion control studies under paragraph (C) of this rule in order to identify optimal corrosion control treatment for the system.

(C) Performance of corrosion control studies.

(1) Any public water system performing corrosion control studies shall evaluate the effectiveness of each of the following treatments and, if appropriate, combinations of the following treatments to identify the optimal corrosion control treatment for that system:

(a) Alkalinity and pH adjustment;

(b) Calcium hardness adjustment; and

(c) The addition of a phosphate-based or silicate-based corrosion inhibitor at a concentration sufficient to maintain an effective residual concentration in all test tap samples.

(2) The water system shall evaluate each of the corrosion control treatments using either pipe rig/loop tests, metal coupon tests, partial-system tests, or analyses based on documented analogous treatments with other systems of similar size, water chemistry, and distribution system configuration.

(3) The water system shall measure the following water quality parameters in any tests conducted under this paragraph before and after evaluating the corrosion control treatments listed above:

(a) Lead;

(b) Copper;

(c) pH;

(d) Alkalinity;

(e) Calcium;

(f) Conductivity;

(g) Orthophosphate (when an inhibitor containing a phosphate compound is used);

(h) Silicate (when an inhibitor containing a silicate compound is used); and

(i) Water temperature.

(4) The water system shall identify all chemical or physical constraints that limit or prohibit the use of a particular corrosion control treatment and document such constraints with at least one of the following:

(a) Data and documentation showing that a particular corrosion control treatment has adversely affected other water treatment processes when used by another water system with comparable water quality characteristics; and/or

(b) Data and documentation demonstrating that the water system has previously attempted to evaluate a particular corrosion control treatment and has found that the treatment is ineffective or adversely affects other water quality treatment processes.

(5) The water system shall evaluate the effect of the chemicals used for corrosion control treatment on other water quality treatment processes.

(6) On the basis of an analysis of the data generated during each evaluation, the water system shall recommend to the director in writing the treatment option that the corrosion control studies indicate constitutes optimal corrosion control treatment for that system, and submit approvable plans therefor in accordance with Chapter 3745-91 of the Administrative Code. The water system shall provide a rationale for its recommendation along with all supporting documentation specified in paragraphs (C)(1) to (C)(5) of this rule.

(D) Director approval of optimal corrosion control treatment plans.

(1) Based upon consideration of available information, including, where applicable, studies performed under paragraph (C) of this rule and a system's recommended treatment alternative, the director shall review the corrosion control treatment plan submitted by the system. When reviewing the submitted optimal treatment plan the director shall consider the effects that additional corrosion control treatment will have on water quality parameters and on other water quality treatment processes.

(2) The director shall notify the system of the decision on the optimal corrosion control treatment plan in writing and explain the basis for this determination. If the director requests additional information to aid the review, the water system shall provide the information.

(E) Installation of optimal corrosion control. Each public water system shall properly install and operate throughout its distribution system the optimal corrosion control treatment approved by the director under paragraph (D) of this rule.

(F) Director review of treatment and specification of optimal water quality control parameters. The director shall evaluate the results of all lead and copper tap monitoring and water quality parameter monitoring submitted by the public water system and determine whether the system has properly installed and operated the optimal corrosion control treatment plan approved by the director in paragraph (D) of this rule. Upon reviewing the results of tap water and water quality parameter monitoring by the system, both before and after the system installs optimal corrosion control treatment, the director shall specify values for the applicable water quality control parameters listed in paragraphs (F)(1) to (F)(5) of this rule to reflect optimal corrosion control treatment for the system. The director may specify values for additional water quality control parameters determined by the director to reflect optimal corrosion control for the system. The director shall notify the system in writing of these determinations and explain the basis for the decisions. Common water quality control parameters include:

(1) A minimum value or a range of values for pH measured at each entry point to the distribution system;

(2) A minimum value for pH measured in all tap samples taken for water quality parameter determinations. Such value shall be equal to or greater than 7.0, unless the director determines that meeting a pH level of 7.0 is not technologically feasible or is not necessary for the system to optimize corrosion control;

(3) If a corrosion inhibitor is used, a minimum concentration or a range of concentrations for the inhibitor, measured at each entry point to the distribution system and in all tap samples, that the director determines is necessary to form a passivating film on the interior walls of the pipes of the distribution system;

(4) If alkalinity is adjusted as part of optimal corrosion control treatment, a minimum concentration or a range of concentrations for alkalinity, measured at each entry point to the distribution system and in all tap samples; and

(5) If calcium carbonate stabilization is used as part of corrosion control, a minimum concentration or range of concentrations for calcium, measured in all tap samples.

(G) Continued operation and monitoring. All public water systems optimizing corrosion control shall continue to operate and maintain optimal corrosion control treatment, including maintaining water quality parameters at or above minimum values or within ranges designated by the director under paragraph (F) of this rule, in accordance with this paragraph for all samples collected under paragraphs (D) to (F) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code. Compliance with the requirements of this paragraph shall be determined every six months, as specified under paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-87 of the Administrative Code. A water system is out of compliance with the requirements of this paragraph for a six-month period if it has excursions for any director-specified parameter on more than nine days during the period. An excursion occurs whenever the daily value for one or more of the water quality parameters measured at the sampling location is below the minimum value or outside the range designated by the director. Daily values are calculated as follows. The director has discretion to delete results of obvious sampling errors from this calculation.

(1) On days when more than one measurement for the water quality parameter is collected at the sampling location, the daily value shall be the average of all results collected during the day regardless of whether they are collected through continuous monitoring, grab sampling, or a combination of both.

(2) On days when only one measurement for the water quality parameter is collected at the sampling location, the daily value shall be the result of that measurement.

(3) On days when no measurement is collected for the water quality parameter at the sampling location, the daily value shall be the daily value calculated on the most recent day on which the water quality parameter was measured at the site.

(H) Modification of the director's treatment decisions. Upon the director's own initiative or in response to a request by a public water system, the director may modify the approval of the optimal corrosion control treatment plans under paragraph (D) of this rule or optimal water quality control parameters under paragraph (F) of this rule. A request for modification by a system shall be in writing, explain why the modification is appropriate, and provide supporting documentation. The director may modify the approval where the director concludes that such change is necessary to ensure that the system continues to optimize corrosion control treatment. A revised approval shall be made in writing, set forth the new treatment requirements, explain the basis for the director's decision, and provide an implementation schedule for completing the treatment modifications.

R.C. 119.032 review dates: 04/24/2014 and 04/24/2019
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 09/13/93, 10/17/03

3745-81-83 Control of lead and copper; source water treatment requirements.

Public water systems shall complete the applicable source water at the entry point to the distribution system monitoring and treatment requirements (described in the referenced portions of paragraph (B) of this rule and in rules 3745-81-86 and 3745-81-88 of the Administrative Code) by the deadlines in paragraphs (A)(1) to (A)(6) of this rule.

(A) Deadlines for completing source water treatment steps.

(1) Step one: a system exceeding the lead or copper action level shall complete source water at the entry point to the distribution system monitoring for lead and copper (in accordance with paragraph (B) of rule 3745-81-88 of the Administrative Code), make a treatment recommendation, and submit approvable plans, if needed, to the director (in accordance with paragraph (B)(1) of this rule) no later than one hundred eighty days after the end of the monitoring period during which the lead or copper action level was exceeded.

If monitoring is required annually, triennially, or less frequently, the end of the monitoring period is September thirtieth of the calendar year in which the sampling occurs. If the director has established an alternate period, then the end of the monitoring period will be the last day of that period.

(2) Step two: the director shall complete the review and approval of plans regarding source water treatment (in accordance with paragraph (B)(2) of this rule) within six months after submission of monitoring results under step one.

(3) Step three: if the director requires installation of source water treatment, the system shall install the treatment (in accordance with paragraph (B)(3) of this rule) within twenty-four months after completion of step two.

(4) Step four: the system shall complete follow-up tap water monitoring (in accordance with paragraph (D)(2) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code) and source water at the entry point to the distribution system monitoring (in accordance with paragraph (C) of rule 3745-81-88 of the Administrative Code) within thirty-six months after completion of step two.

(5) Step five: the director shall review the system's installation and operation of source water treatment and specify maximum permissible source water at the entry point to the distribution system levels (in accordance with paragraph (B)(4) of this rule) within six months after completion of step four.

(6) Step six: the system shall operate in compliance with the director-specified maximum permissible lead and copper source water at the entry point to the distribution system levels (in accordance with paragraph (B)(4) of this rule) and continue monitoring (in accordance with paragraph (D) of rule 3745-81-88 of the Administrative Code).

(B) Description of source water treatment requirements.

(1) System treatment recommendation. Any system which exceeds the lead or copper action level shall recommend in writing to the director the installation and operation of one of the source water treatments listed in paragraph (B)(2) of this rule. A system may recommend that no treatment be installed based upon a demonstration that source water treatment is not necessary to minimize lead and copper levels at user's taps.

(2) Director determination regarding source water treatment. The director shall complete an evaluation of the results of all source water at the entry point to the distribution system monitoring submitted by the water system to determine whether source water treatment is necessary to minimize lead or copper levels in water delivered to users' taps. If the director determines that treatment is needed, the system shall submit approvable plans for source water treatment selected from ion exchange, reverse osmosis, lime softening, or coagulation/filtration. If the director requests additional information to aid in the review, the water system shall provide the information by the date specified in the director's request. The director shall notify the system in writing of the determination and set forth the basis for the decision.

(3) Installation of source water treatment. Each system shall properly install and operate the source water treatment approved by the director under paragraph (B)(2) of this rule.

(4) Director's review of source water treatment and specification of maximum permissible levels of lead and copper at source water at the entry points to the distribution system. The director shall review the source water at the entry point to the distribution system monitoring completed by the water system both before and after the system installs source water treatment, and determine whether the system has properly installed and operated the source water treatment approved by the director. Based upon the review, the director shall specify the maximum permissible lead and copper concentrations for finished water entering the distribution system. Such levels shall reflect the contaminant removal capability of the treatment properly operated and maintained. The director shall notify the system in writing and explain the basis for the decision.

(5) Continued operation and maintenance. Each water system shall maintain lead and copper levels below the maximum permissible concentrations specified by the director at each sampling point monitored in accordance with rule 3745-81-88 of the Administrative Code. The system is out of compliance with this paragraph if the level of lead or copper at any sampling point is greater than the maximum permissible concentration specified by the director.

(6) Modification of director treatment decisions. Upon the director's initiative or in response to a request by a water system, the director may modify the approval of the source water treatment plans under paragraph (B)(2) of this rule, or maximum permissible lead and copper concentrations for finished water entering the distribution system under paragraph (B)(4) of this rule. A request for modification by a system shall be in writing, explain why the modification is appropriate, and provide supporting documentation. The director may modify the approval where the director concludes that such change is necessary to ensure that the system continues to minimize lead and copper concentrations in source water at the entry point to the distribution system. A revised approval shall be made in writing, set forth the new treatment requirements, explain the basis for the director's decision, and provide an implementation schedule for completing the treatment modifications.

R.C. 119.032 review dates: 04/24/2014 and 04/24/2019
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.04
Prior Effective Dates: 09/13/93, 10/17/03

3745-81-84 Control of lead and copper - lead service line replacement requirements.

(A) Public water systems that exceed the lead action level in tap water monitoring pursuant to paragraph (D)(2) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code, after installing corrosion control and/or source water treatment (whichever sampling occurs later), shall replace lead service lines in accordance with the requirements of this rule. If a system is in violation of rule 3745-81-81 or rule 3745-81-83 of the Administrative Code for failure to install source water treatment or corrosion control treatment, the director may require the system to commence lead service line replacement under this rule after the date by which the system was required to conduct monitoring under paragraph (D)(2) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code has passed.

(B) Lead service line replacement schedule.

(1) A water system shall replace annually at least seven per cent of the initial number of lead service lines in its distribution system. The initial number of lead service lines is the number of lead lines in place at the time the replacement program begins. The system shall identify the initial number of lead service lines in its distribution system, including an identification of the portion(s) owned by the system, based on a materials evaluation, including the evaluation required under paragraph (A) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code and relevant legal authorities regarding the portion owned by the system(e.g., contracts and local ordinances).

The first year of lead service line replacement shall begin on the first day following the end of the monitoring period in which the action level was exceeded under paragraph (A) of this rule. If monitoring is required annually, triennially, or less frequently, the end of the monitoring period is September thirtieth of the calendar year in which the sampling occurs. If the director has established an alternate period, then the end of the monitoring period will be the last day of that period.

(2) Any water system resuming a lead service replacement program after the cessation of its lead service line replacement program, as allowed by paragraph (F) of this rule, shall update its inventory of lead service lines to include those sites that were previously determined not to require replacement through the sampling provision under paragraph (C) of this rule. The system will then divide the updated number of remaining lead service lines by the number of remaining years in the program to determine the number of lines that must be replaced per year (seven per cent lead service line replacement is based on a fifteen year replacement program: e.g., systems resuming lead service line replacement after previously conducting two years of replacement would divide the updated inventory by thirteen). For those systems that have completed a fifteen year lead service line replacement program, the director will determine a schedule for replacing or retesting lines that were previously tested out under the replacement program when the system re-exceeds the action level.

(C) A public water system is not required to replace an individual lead service line if the lead concentration in all service line samples from that line, taken pursuant to paragraph (B)(3) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code, is less than or equal to 0.015 milligram per liter.

(D) A public water system shall replace that portion of the lead service line that it owns. In cases where the system does not own the entire lead service line, the system shall notify the owner of the line, or the owner's authorized agent, that the system will replace the portion of the service line that it owns and shall offer to replace the owner's portion of the line. A system is not required to bear the cost of replacing the privately-owned portion of the line, nor is it required to replace the privately-owned portion where the owner chooses not to pay the cost of replacing the privately-owned portion of the line, or where replacing the privately-owned portion would be precluded by state, local, or common law. A water system that does not replace the entire length of the service line also shall complete the following tasks.

(1) At least forty-five days prior to commencing with the partial replacement of a lead service line, the water system shall provide notice to the residents of all buildings served by the line explaining that they may experience a temporary increase of lead levels in their drinking water, along with guidance on measures consumers can take to minimize their exposure to lead. The director may allow the water system to provide notice under the previous sentence less than forty-five days prior to commencing partial lead service line replacement where such replacement is in conjunction with emergency repairs. In addition, the water system shall inform the residents serviced by the line that the system will, at the system's expense, collect a sample from each partially-replaced lead service line that is representative of the water in the service line for analysis of lead content, as prescribed under paragraph (B)(3) of rule 3745-81-86 of the Administrative Code, within seventy-two hours after the completion of the partial replacement of the service line. The 3745-81-842systemshall collect the sample and report the results of the analysis to the owner and the residents served by the line within three business days of receiving the results. Mailed notices post-marked within three business days of receiving the results shall be considered"on time".

(2) The water system shall provide the information required by paragraph (D)(1) of this rule to the residents of individual dwellings by mail or by other methods approved by the director. In instances where multi-family dwellings are served by the line, the water system shall have the option to post information at a conspicuous location.

(E) The director shall require a public water system to replace lead service lines on a shorter schedule than that required by this rule, taking into account the number of lead service lines in the system, where such a shorter replacement schedule is feasible. The director shall make this determination in writing and notify the system of the finding within six months after the system is required to commence lead service line replacement based on monitoring referenced in paragraph (A) of this rule.