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This website publishes administrative rules on their effective dates, as designated by the adopting state agencies, colleges, and universities.

Chapter 3344-21 | Policy on Academic Misconduct

 
 
 
Rule
Rule 3344-21-01 | General procedures.
 

Once a grade has been submitted to the registrar's office, a faculty member may change it only because of an error in computation and only with permission of the dean. If an instructor and a student disagree on a grade issued the student may request a meeting with the faculty member and his or her superior whether it be chairperson or dean. If the matter is not resolved the issue then follows collegiate procedures and may come before a review committee. Finally, a recommendation is made to the university admissions and standards committee of the faculty senate by the college. The burden is on the student to prove that a computational error has been made or that non-uniform standards have been applied.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 111.15
Amplifies: 3344
Prior Effective Dates: 11/4/1977
Rule 3344-21-02 | Policy on academic misconduct.
 

(A) Policy.

(1) Academic honesty is essential to maintain the integrity of the university as an institution and to foster an environment conducive to the pursuit of knowledge. The Cleveland state university community values honesty and integrity and holds its members to high standards of ethical conduct. Academic dishonesty is, unacceptable, and students who are found to have engaged in academic dishonesty, or knowingly facilitated academic dishonesty by another student, may be sanctioned as outlined in the procedures for charges of academic misconduct. Academic misconduct refers to any fraudulent actions or behaviors designed to affect the evaluation of a student's academic performance or record of academic progress. It includes, but is not limited to:

(a) Cheating: using or attempting to use or possessing any aid, information, resources, or means in the completion of any graded course content such as, but not limited to, an academic assignment, quiz, examination, paper, portfolio, project, thesis, dissertation, or assessment (collectively defined as "assessment") that are not explicitly permitted by the instructor, or facilitating cheating by another student.

Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to:

(i) Possessing, referring to, or using in any way unauthorized textbooks, notes, study aids, websites, crib/cheat sheets, electronic transmissions, or other information when completing an academic assessment;

(ii) Possessing, referring to, giving, or using in any way unauthorized electronic devices, transmissions or other materials when completing an academic assessment;

(iii) Looking at, using, or obtaining unauthorized information from another individual's work when completing an academic assessment;

(iv) Giving or receiving answers, information, or materials from another individual when completing any academic assessment when not explicitly permitted by the instructor;

(v) Utilizing or soliciting another person or entity to complete any portion of an academic assessment in place of the student or submitting the work of another person or entity as the student's own;

(vi) Submitting the identical or substantially the same assessment or portions of an assessment to fulfill the requirements for two or more courses without approval of both instructors involved, including when repeating a course; or submitting the identical or substantially the same assessment or portions of an assessment from a previously completed course to fulfill the requirements for another course without the approval of the instructor of the latter course; or submitting the identical or substantially the same assessment or portions of the assessment to fulfill the requirements for two or more academic assessments within a course without the approval of the instructor;

(vii) Completing or participating in the completion of any portion of an academic assessment for another student to submit as his or her own work, including taking a quiz or an examination for another student, or writing any portion of an essay, paper, thesis, project, or dissertation for another student for submission in person or submitting to an online learning management system;

(viii) Providing answers, information, or materials to another student in a manner not authorized by the instructor, including providing the student's own completed coursework.

(b) Plagiarism: presenting as one's own the work, the ideas, the representations, or the words of another person/source without proper attribution. Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to:

(i) Submitting material that in part or whole is not entirely one's own work without accurate and appropriate citations and attribution (including appropriate use of quotation marks);

(ii) Using the words, ideas, or structure/sequence of another person or source without accurate and appropriate citation and attribution (including the appropriate use of quotation marks);

(iii) Too closely paraphrasing by the wholesale reproduction of the structure and ideas of the original text, but merely changing some of the wording.

(iv) Submitting material using translation software/devices without permission from the instructor.

(c) Fabrication: falsification, invention, or manipulation of any information, citation, data, or method. Examples of fabrication include, but are not limited to:

(i) Changing material on a graded academic assessment after it has been returned to the student by the instructor and then requesting the instructor to regrade that assessment, without specific instruction from the instructor to do that;

(ii) Presenting false or invented information as fact in any academic assessment;

(iii) Presenting false claims or an inaccurate account regarding how information or data was collected or generated;

(iv) Inventing, inaccurately presenting, or manipulating data and/or its outcomes;

(v) Inventing or inaccurately presenting citations or sources.

(vi) Changing or manipulating, or attempting to change or manipulate, the grade for any assessment in any grade recording system. Misrepresenting, or attempting to misrepresent, a grade to any campus person or entity.

(vii) Changing, manipulating or misrepresenting the course grade or course information on an official or unofficial document for review by a university official.

(d) Unauthorized collaboration: working with another individual or individuals in any phase of or in the completion of an individual academic assessment without explicit permission from the instructor to complete the work in such a manner.

(e) Sharing CSU credentials with another person to login to an online learning management system.

(f) Misrepresentation: falsely representing oneself or one's efforts or abilities in an academic assessment. Examples of misrepresentation include, but are not limited to:

(i) Utilizing another person to complete any portion of an academic assessment in place of one's self;

(ii) Having another individual sign-in to indicate attendance for a course or use an electronic device to record one's presence or participation in a class.

(iii) Signing another student's name or using an electronic device to record another's presence or participation in a class or on an academic assessment;

(iv) Having another person or entity sign-in to the electronic learning management system on behalf of a current student.

(v) Including one's own name on a group project, allowing one's name to be included when one did not contribute to the work, or claiming credit for work completed by another group member;

(vi) Including unacknowledged sources or citations in an academic assessment.

(g) Gaining an unfair advantage: completing an academic assessment through use of information or means not available to other students or engaging in any activity that interferes with another student's ability to complete his or her academic work. Examples of gaining an unfair advantage include, but are not limited to:

(i) Retaining, possessing, using, distributing or making public previous or current academic assessment materials when the instructor has indicated that those materials are not to be retained or shared or are to be returned to the instructor at the conclusion of the academic assessment or course (including originals, copies, reproductions, pictures and electronic or hard copy formats, or uploading to websites or providing for sale);

(ii) Taking pictures of, making copies of, or reproducing any academic assignment materials when the instructor has indicated that those materials are not to be copied or reproduced in any form;

(iii) Obstructing or interfering with another student's academic work or ability to gain access to information to be used in the completion of an academic assessment;

(iv) Taking or using another student's work without his or her knowledge;

(v) Removing or tampering with academic assessment materials from an instructor's office, classroom, computer, or any other university space (physical or virtual/electronic);

(vi) Violating the procedures intended to maintain the integrity of an academic assessment, including any procedures associated with online proctoring.

(vii) Using an electronic device in any capacity for any purpose when the assessment instructions strictly prohibit its use.

(h) Bribery: offering money or any item or service to a faculty member or any other person to gain academic advantage for oneself or another.

(2) Attempts to engage in any of the listed actions will be treated the same as completed acts.

(3) Students may be held responsible for committing academic dishonesty while enrolled in a course even if the student has withdrawn from, or subsequently withdraws from the course.

(4) Students may be held responsible for committing academic misconduct at any point evidence of academic misconduct comes to light. This includes after a course is completed and a grade has been received, and/or after a student graduates. If a student no longer meets the degree requirements because of a sanction imposed as a result of academic misconduct, the degree will be rescinded.

(5) For purposes referenced in paragraphs (A)(6)(a) to (A)(6)(c) of this rule, all of the listed actions in this rule shall fall under the heading of "academic misconduct."

(6) For the purpose of differentiating the degree of seriousness of acts of academic misconduct and the sanctions that should be imposed, the following definitions apply:

(a) "Minor Infraction" - Minor infractions are instances of academic misconduct on an individual assessment which comprises less than twenty per cent of the overall course grade. Two or more instances of minor infractions within a course or across courses constitute a major infraction.

(b) "Major infraction" - Major infractions are instances of academic misconduct on an individual class assessment which comprises twenty per cent or more of the overall course grade. Two or more instances of minor infractions within a course or across courses constitute a major infraction. The second minor infraction will result in a major infraction in the second course if both minor infractions did not happen in the same course.

(c) "Program infraction" - Program infractions comprise those instances of cheating which affect the integrity of the student's degree program. Examples include, but are not limited to, committing academic misconduct on capstone projects, theses, dissertations, portfolios, clinical activities, internships, and externships, or committing academic misconduct in more than one course essential to degree program completion. Other examples include falsifying documents or providing doctored transcripts.

(7) Any member of the university community can raise allegations of academic misconduct. Generally, the determination that a student has engaged in academic misconduct, will be made following investigation by the faculty member or instructor, although, depending on the circumstances, that determination may be made following investigation by the department chairperson or college, dean or provost's designee in accordance with the circumstances.

(B) The policy on academic misconduct is implemented by the procedures on academic misconduct, which are promulgated by the provost, after appropriate notice to the university community.

(C) Any question of interpretation or application of the policy on academic misconduct shall be referred to the provost for final determination.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 111.15
Amplifies: 3344
Prior Effective Dates: 11/4/1977
Rule 3344-21-03 | Credit by examination.
 

At Cleveland state university, matriculated students can earn credit toward degree requirements through examination. The credit by examination program permits a student to begin college work at a level consistent with his or her academic background, to avoid repeating course material already mastered, to pursue a more flexible schedule, and to reduce the time required for graduation. Students may use the credit by examination program to demonstrate college level achievements and proficiencies acquired outside a university classroom. Most often this means knowledge gained by independent study, employment, specialized study courses, or honors courses in high school.

(A) Cleveland state university recognizes four different types of examinations for credit.

(1) Advanced placement program ("APP"). This is the oldest credit by examination program. It is offered under the auspices of the college entrance examination board to high school students who have completed an official advanced placement course. Arrangements for testing are made through the high school in which the student is enrolled. CSU grants freshman year credit, (four to twelve term credits), for each examination score of three, four, or five. Credit is available in art, biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, English, foreign languages, history, mathematics, music, physics, political science, and psychology. A transfer student who received APP credit at another institution should have the official score report mailed directly to the CSU admission office.

(2) Departmental examinations. Some departments at the university have developed end-of-course examinations for certain courses or learning sequences in the curriculum. The administration and grading of these examinations, as well as the level of achievement required for credit, are in the hands of the department chairperson. Questions about course examinations for credit should be directed to the appropriate department office.

(3) College level examination program-general examinations ("CLEP-general exams"). This is a series of five comprehensive examinations developed under the auspices of the college entrance examination board. CLEP-general exams are administered at the CSU counseling and testing center as well as at other testing centers across the country and by the defense activity for non-traditional education support. For a score of five hundred or above, credit is granted as follows: Humanities, twelve term hours; mathematics, four term hours; natural sciences, twelve term hours; social science - history, twelve term hours. For a score of five hundred and a satisfactory essay, four term hours are granted in English. Registration forms for the CLEP-general examinations are available at the CSU counseling and testing center, rhodes tower, room 1235. A transfer student who received credit for the CLEP-general exams at another institution should have the official score report sent to the CSU admission office along with his or her college transcript.

(4) College level examination program-subject examinations. These are essentially end-of-course-examinations for thirty-five widely taught undergraduate courses. The examinations are administered at the CSU counseling and testing center as well as at testing centers across the country and by the defense activity for non-traditional education support. Examinations are available for courses taught in the departments of accounting, biology, business law, chemistry, computer and information science, economics, English, foreign languages, history, management, marketing, mathematics, political science, psychology, and sociology. Either four or eight term hours of credit, depending upon whether the course covers one or two terms of work is available for each examination. With the exception of the mathematics examinations all CLEP-subject examinations are composed of an objective and an essay section. An objective examination score of fifty-two and, for most courses, the essay section approved by the department concerned is necessary for credit to be granted. Registration forms for the CLEP-subject examination and additional information about the examinations are available from the CSU counseling and testing center, rhodes tower, room 1235. A transfer student who received credit for CLEP-subject examinations at another institution should have the official score report and essay sent to the CSU admission office along with his or her college transcript.

(B) The following regulations apply to the credit by examination program:

(1) Credit is available only to matriculated degree seeking students.

(2) Credit granted for successful completion of an examination shall be entered on the student's permanent record as hours earned. A grade is not assigned.

(3) If a student does not receive a score high enough for credit, no entry is made on the student's permanent record.

(4) Credit shall not be granted for areas of study or for particular courses in which a student has already earned or been granted CSU credit.

(5) Credit shall not be granted for a course if the student has previously earned or been granted credit for a more advanced course in a learning sequence.

(6) Generally, CSU does not approve for credit the score made when an examination has been repeated.

(7) CLEP credit may not be part of a student's final fourty-five term hours.

(8) The maximum amount of credit for each type of examination is listed below:

(a) Advanced placement program no limit

(b) Departmental examinations fourty-five term hours

(c) CLEP-general examinations fourty-four term hours

(d) CLEP-subject examinations fourty-four term hours

(9) All students are urged to discuss their plans with their academic advisors before taking any examinations for credit.

(C) For graduate students, not more than one-half the credits required for the degree may be earned by a combination of examination and transfer.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 111.15
Amplifies: 3344
Prior Effective Dates: 11/4/1977
Rule 3344-21-04 | Grade reporting.
 

Each term the registrar's office sends to each college grade sheets and instructions. Grades are due in the registrar's office forty-eight hours after the completion of each final examination. Grades not returned on time shall be recorded as double asterisk on the students' grade reports. The double asterisk will be changed to an "NR" if the grade sheet is not returned to the registrar's office by the first date corrections are updated for the term. The "NR" grade is computed as an "F" in the term and cumulative average. The grade can be changed according to the regulations applying to "I" grades. If not removed, the grade remains an "NR," carrying the same quality point value as an "F." Graduate student's "NR" grades are not immediately computed as an "F." However, if not changed in the prescribed time, the "NR" shall become an "F." Grades are to be delivered in person to the registrar's office, not through the U.S. mail or campus mail. The vice provost of the undergraduate college, the dean of the graduate college, and the provost are all notified of any instructors who fail to return grades by the deadline.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 111.15
Amplifies: 3344
Prior Effective Dates: 11/4/1977
Rule 3344-21-05 | Incomplete grade.
 

(A) The grade of incomplete ("I") is given when the work in a course has been generally passing, but when some specifically required task has not been completed through no fault of the student. The grade of "I" will be changed to "F" if the student does not complete the remaining work by established university deadlines as follows: If the grade of "I" was assigned for a fall, spring, or summer term, the deadline is the last day of classes of the following term. If the grade of "I" was assigned for a spring term, the deadline is the Friday of the fourth week of classes of the following fall term. These deadlines apply both to undergraduate and graduate students. These deadlines apply whether or not the student is enrolled for the term during which the deadline falls. An earlier (but not a later) deadline may be assigned by the instructor. An extension of a university deadline date may be obtained only if approved by the college, which offered the course.

(B) There are two important conditions for giving an incomplete:

(1) The student can receive a passing grade if the student completes all of the work of the course, and

(2) Failure to complete through no fault of the student.

(C) Assignment of an incomplete also assumes that the incomplete part of the course represents only some limited portion such as the final examination or a term paper or a laboratory report. The extent of the permissible deficiency would have to be left to the instructor. It should be assumed that the instructor is aware of the reasons for the student's failure to complete the work and has given permission for the student to make up the work. Failure of a student to appear for the final examination without an explanation to the instructor would not be sufficient ground for giving an incomplete. In general the grade should be avoided except where it is clearly justified as in the case of illness or accident.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 111.15
Amplifies: 3344
Rule 3344-21-06 | Releasing information about students.
 

The registrar's office has available copies of the university policies dealing with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 111.15
Amplifies: 3344