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This website publishes administrative rules on their effective dates, as designated by the adopting state agencies, colleges, and universities.

Chapter 3341-3 | Graduate and Under-Graduate Policies

 
 
 
Rule
Rule 3341-3-01 | Academic progress, probation, dismissal-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria for academic progress (including graduation), in addition to policies for academic probation and dismissal.

(B) Policy

(1) Academic progress

In order to remain in good standing and to graduate, a student must make "satisfactory progress toward a degree". Academic good standing is defined as:

(a) The maintenance of a three point zero grade point average;

(b) The maintenance of standards of academic and professional integrity expected in a particular discipline or program;

(c) No incomplete grades;

(d) The completion of departmental requirements other than course work, such as comprehensive and preliminary examinations, thesis research, or foreign language requirement, by established deadlines; and

(e) The absence of current suspensions, probations, or other disciplinary sanctions for violations of the student handbook.

A course taken for graduate credit in which a D, F, or WF was received may not be used to meet degree requirements nor to meet the minimum credit hour requirements for a graduate degree; however, the hours and grade are used to compute the cumulative grade point average. If a graduate student repeats a course, each grade received is counted in computing the cumulative grade point average. To compute GPA, the total number of points (on the 4.0 scale) are divided by the total number of hours undertaken for graduate credit, excluding courses in which the marks INC, IP, S, U, or W are recorded.

(2) Academic probation and dismissal

The graduate college monitors all graduate student records at the end of each term once grades have been posted. Students who fail to maintain standards of academic and professional integrity expected in a particular discipline or program, fail to satisfy departmental expectations as noted in item number four under "academic progress", or whose grade point average falls below three point zero are placed on probation, continued on probation, or dismissed.

If it is determined that a student has little or no chance at successful completion, dismissal should be considered. Final approval of dismissal rests with the graduate dean designate. If the decision is made to dismiss the student from his or her program of study, the graduate college will notify the student in writing and the registrar will make the proper notation on the students record.

A student who is on probation is not eligible for a new scholarship contract or assistantship contract unless an exception is requested by program coordinator and granted by the graduate dean designate. Students may lose funding at the end of a term and be placed on probation (without funding) for the subsequent term.

Students who are on probation should work with their graduate coordinator to develop a written success plan that clearly states the outcome required to remedy the academic difficulty, signed by both the student and the program coordinator. This written success plan should be submitted to the graduate college within one month after the start of classes the following semester.

After a semester on probation, a decision will be made jointly by the program and the graduate college to determine whether to: (a) reinstate good standing; (b) continue the probation with an updated written success plan; or (c) dismiss the student from the graduate program.

According to the academic charter, a dismissal is an "administrative withdrawal from the university for a stated period of time not less than one year. . . . After the time has elapsed, the student may apply for readmission on the same basis as any student entering from another school. The student is subject to all regulations dealing with his or her status at the time of dismissal, e.g., academic warning." (See part B, Section.G.2.f.1.b of the academic charter for more details.).

Date: November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-02 | Advanced undergraduates-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria for graduate courses taken by advanced undergraduate students and transfer of BGSU graduate credit taken as an advanced undergraduate.

(B) Policy

(1) Graduate courses for advanced undergraduates

Under certain circumstances, it is permissible for undergraduate students to apply and be approved for advanced undergraduate status for course work prior to having received the baccalaureate degree. Any undergraduate student who wishes to take graduate courses must apply to the graduate college for admission as an advanced undergraduate. Advanced undergraduate requests are term specific and will be processed prior to the first day of the term. To be eligible for advanced undergraduate admission the student must be in Senior Status (having completed ninety semester hours of undergraduate work) during the term the requested courses are to be taken in, and must have a minimum three point zero GPA. Only courses at the 5000 and 6000 levels will be considered. The academic officer in charge of the advanced undergraduates undergraduate degree program will have full authority in determining the appropriateness of a graduate course in fulfilling undergraduate degree requirements. Undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to consult with the director and their advisor.

The student must have the endorsement of the professor of the requested graduate course and the department chair/school director of the unit offering the course. The electronic form will be forwarded for completion once the graduate college is contacted. Upon approval, the graduate college will notify the registration and records office to add the registration to the students schedule. If the course is added to the students schedule, without prior graduate college approval, the course will be dropped from the students schedule. Once processed, if the graduate level course results in the student going over eighteen credit hours, the registration and records office will consult with the students college for final approval. All applicable excess credit fees assessed, as a result of going over eighteen hours, will be the responsibility of the student.

The classification of advanced undergraduate is not equivalent to admission to any particular graduate degree program. Advanced undergraduates wishing to continue their studies as graduate students must apply for admission to their desired graduate degree program, and advanced undergraduate status does not guarantee that admission will be granted. The student who is approved for the classification of advanced undergraduate may not register for more than nine semester hours of graduate course work in any one semester. An advanced undergraduate is eligible for a maximum of nine semester hours of graduate course work during his or her tenure at the university. Note: At the end of both the bachelors degree and masters degree, a student must have a minimum of one hundred fifty credit hours (one hundred twenty plus thirty equals one hundred fifty per state of Ohio regulations).

(2) Transfer of BGSU graduate credit taken as an advanced undergraduate

Students who have been fully admitted into a graduate degree program or graduate certificate program may count (as both graduate and undergraduate credit) up to nine hours of graduate credit earned as a BGSU advanced undergraduate. Students must have earned a grade of A or B for this to be allowed. Specific graduate programs may have additional limitations on the number of credits that can be approved, and the specific courses which are eligible. Students should refer to specific graduate program descriptions for details of these limitations.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-03 | Appeals policy-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes the types of graduate student appeals, pre-appeal procedures, and formal appeal procedures. This includes information on grade appeals, non-grade academic appeals, and assistantship-related appeals.

(B) Policy

(1) Types of appeals

(a) This policy describes the three types of appeals a graduate student may seek.

(i) Grade appeals, including a grade assigned for a graduate course;

(ii) Non-grade academic appeal, including academic standing, qualifying, comprehensive, or preliminary examination results, thesis or dissertation defense, or program dismissal.

(iii) Assistantship-related appeal, including training, work assignments, or financial disputes involving graduate assistant contracts or awards.

(b) This policy includes only the listed types of appeals. This policy does not apply to cases of academic honesty, cases related to student conduct, or cases related to sexual, racial, ethnic and other forms of harassment and discrimination.

(2) Timeline and notification of intent to appeal

(a) To be eligible to appeal, a student must notify the graduate college of their intent to appeal. This notification must be received within fourteen calendar days of the decision under appeal.

(b) Prompt resolution of appeals is in the best interest of all parties. However, there may be situations where exceptions are warranted. All timeline exceptions require approval of the graduate college. Upon approval, all appropriate parties will be informed.

(3) Pre-appeals procedures

(a) Prior to initiating a formal appeal, a student should consult with the instructor (grade appeal), graduate program coordinator (academic appeal), or supervisor (assistantship-related appeal). The graduate college encourages students to seek a solution to all issues at the most local level, ensuring the least disruption to the learning experience.

(4) Formal appeal procedures

(a) Initiating the formal appeal

(i) If an issue is not able to be resolved with the informal consultation, a formal appeal can be initiated with a letter to the instructor (grade appeal), graduate program coordinator (non-grade academic appeal), or supervisor/graduate program coordinator (assistantship-related appeal), with a copy sent to the graduate college dean or designee.

(ii) It is the student's responsibility to inform the graduate college of the intent to appeal, and follow the procedures outlined in this policy.

(iii) To ensure a comprehensive review, the students formal appeal letter should include the following information:

(a) The type of appeal being filed;

(b) All relevant information related to the issue being appealed;

(c) Any evidence to be considered during the appeal review; and

(d) The students desired outcome.

(iv) The graduate college dean or designee should be included in all communications related to appeals.

(b) Formal appeal levels of review

(i) A formal grade appeal includes a separate review at each of the following levels.

(a) Instructor;

(b) Graduate program coordinator;

(c) Department chair / school director; and

(d) Graduate college appeal committee/ graduate college review.

(ii) A formal non-grade academic appeal includes a separate review at each of the following levels:

(a) Graduate program coordinator;

(b) Department chair / school director; and

(c) Graduate college appeal committee/ graduate college review.

(iii) A formal assistantship-related appeal includes a separate review at each of the following levels.

(a) Supervisor (if applicable);

(b) Graduate program coordinator;

(c) Department chair / school director; and

(d) Graduate college appeal committee/ graduate college review.

(iv) In cases in which there are multiple academic or non-academic units involved in an appeal, the student should contact the graduate college, which will determine the appropriate levels of review.

(v) A written response should be sent to the student following each level of review. This response should include a clear statement of support or lack of support for the students requested outcome. The written response should be sent to the student within seven calendar days of the completion of the review.

(vi) After each level of review, it is the students responsibility to forward the appeal to the next level of review with all relevant documents. If the student does not forward their appeal within seven calendar days, the appeal will be closed.

(c) Graduate college appeal hearing

(i) A graduate college appeal committee will only be formed if the appeal is based on new evidence, misinterpretation of evidence, or significant procedural error. Cases not based on new evidence, misinterpretation of evidence, or significant procedural error will receive a final review and letter from the graduate college dean or designee without a committee hearing.

(ii) Appeal committee membership

(a) The appeal committee outlined below includes faculty, staff and graduate students who have had no conflicts of interest with parties involved in the appeal. They must all be from outside the students program.

(b) The committee is comprised of the following members:

(i) An associate dean from the students college (serving as committee chair);

(ii) A graduate student in good academic standing (in the case of a doctoral students appeal, a reasonable effort will be made to have a doctoral student serve on the committee);

(iii) A regular member of the graduate faculty; and

(iv) A representative of the office of student employment services (assistantship-related appeal only).

(c) If it is necessary for the graduate college to change committee membership, all parties will be notified as early as possible.

(iii) Hearing procedures

(a) The hearing and investigation by the appointed appeal committee shall be conducted in closed session with only members of the committee and invited or approved persons present.

(b) Both the student and the instructor / graduate program coordinator / supervisor may be accompanied by someone of their choosing during the hearing. These advisors are not permitted to participate directly in the hearing or speak for the student or instructor / graduate program coordinator / supervisor. If an advisor is invited, the graduate college must be notified and contact information must be shared prior to the hearing.

(c) An audio recording will be made of the appeal hearing and a summary will be prepared by personnel from the graduate college. Copies of the summary will be distributed to the appropriate parties concerned and be kept on file in the office of the graduate college as appropriate.

(d) Both the student and the instructor / graduate program coordinator / supervisor have the right to present and question information at the hearing. The committees final recommendation is to be based on only information provided prior to the hearing and information presented at the hearing.

(e) If the student or the instructor / graduate program coordinator / supervisor fail to attend the hearing, the hearing will be held in their absence. A hearing will only be rescheduled based on compelling extenuating circumstances.

(f) Committee deliberations are not recorded.

(g) The appeal committee will reach a consensus and the chair of the committee should provide a written recommendation to the graduate college dean or designee within seven calendar days of the hearing.

(d) Due process rights

(i) The student and the instructor / graduate program coordinator / supervisor will both have the right to:

(a) Receive official notice of the time and place of the hearing;

(b) Supply evidence to be reviewed at the hearing;

(c) Review evidence prior to the hearing;

(d) Question evidence at the hearing;

(e) Be accompanied an advisor; and

(f) Receive notice of the final recommendation made by the committee.

(e) Graduate college final letter

(i) The graduate college dean or designee will review the recommendation from the appeal committee chair and make a final recommendation in the case. The graduate college will convey the final recommendation in writing to the appropriate parties within seven calendar days. In addition to the final graduate college recommendation, the appeal hearing summary and the appeal committee recommendation will also be shared with all appropriate parties.

(5) Appeal review outcome

For grade appeals and non-grade academic appeals, recommendations following an appeal review are advisory, and the original individual/committee/body retains the right of final decision. For assistantship-related appeals, the graduate college retains the right of final decision.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 12/3/2015
Rule 3341-3-04 | Background checks-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria and procedures for background checks.

In April 2011 BGSU approved a university-wide policy requiring a background investigation for all newly hired or rehired staff including graduate assistants. The purpose of this policy is to enhance the safety and security of BGSU students, faculty, staff, and others, and to safeguard university property and resources.

The policy is in effect for all graduate assistant contracts (stipends) issued after September 1, 2012. International students and students enrolled in a program with a pre-approved background check policy are exempt.

For graduate assistants with stipends who re-hired after a break in employment of twelve months or more from the end of the most recent period of employment, a background check will be required.

(B) Policy

The university has contracted with "PreTrax," a nation-wide professional firm specializing in background searches and investigations, to conduct these checks. The criminal background investigation will be performed as part of the hiring process to verify that the prospective graduate assistant does not have a pending charge, arrest, or criminal record that may make their employment a risk to the university. The university is responsible for covering the cost of the background check.

(1) The basic background check authorized for graduate assistant candidates includes:

(a) Social security address verification

(b) County criminal felony and misdemeanor search based on the past seven year address history:

(i) Up to five counties/municipal courts searched;

(ii) Additional searches at a la carte pricing;

(iii) Some counties charge an access fee.

(c) National criminal and multi-jurisdictional sex offender search

(i) Includes the department of corrections, FBI terrorist watch list, federal/state/local wanted fugitive list, multi state sex offender registry, Interpol most wanted

(d) Federal district criminal search (Up to three searches included additional searches at a la carte pricing)

(2) Notification to graduate assistant candidates

All graduate students issued contracts shall be notified at the time of their contract offer of the requirement to successfully pass the background investigation. The notification will be included in the statement of understanding that accompanies all contract offers.

The background check will not be initiated until the student has signed the contract electronically and accepted the terms of the statement of understanding.

(3) Procedures

The statement of understanding that accompanies all graduate assistant contract offers will be updated to include the following information:

Graduate assistants are required to authorize and pass a background investigation prior to the start of employment. Offers of employment are conditional until a background investigation has been successfully completed and all other pre-employment requirements are satisfied. The university reserves the right to determine and confirm suitability for employment and to end any employment already begun if the background check reveals disqualifying information.

Note that a past criminal conviction identified during a background check does not automatically cancel the contract offer. Candidates will be given the opportunity to provide additional information, to explain the nature and circumstances of the conviction, and any evidence of rehabilitation. In determining suitability for employment, consideration will be given to factors that include: the specific duties of the graduate assistantship position; the number of offenses and circumstances of each; date of conviction; and whether the conviction rose out of employment. If you have any concerns or would like to have a confidential discussion regarding your situation please contact the graduate college office at BGSU (419) 372-2791 and request to speak to the dean or associate dean of the graduate college.

If this is your first assistantship contract you will receive an e-mail notification from "PreTrax," the company BGSU uses to conduct background investigations. Please complete the information requested in the email message and respond to PreTrax within five business days. Failure to complete the background investigation process will disqualify you from employment with Bowling Green state university. You should receive the "PreTrax" e-mail one to five business days after you sign your contract. (If you have not received this email, please be sure it was not filtered as junk mail.)

Please note that international students offered a graduate assistant contract who have visas issued by the U.S. state department in the department of homeland security and students who are already required to complete a background investigation as part of their programs admissions process will not be required to complete an additional background investigation by "PreTrax."

(4) Particular steps in the background check process:

(a) After graduate assistant stipend contracts have been issued, a staff member in the student employment services office will monitor signed assistantship contracts and identify the new GAs who have been identified by their department as requiring background checks.

(b) Student employment services office will notify "PreTrax" of the students who require background checks by entering their name, telephone number, and e-mail address in the "PreTrax" website.

(c) Within five days, "PreTrax" sends an e-mail consent/authorization form to the graduate assistant candidate.

(d) The graduate assistant candidate completes and submits an electronic consumer disclosure authorization form to "PreTrax" within five days. Refusal to submit the form will result in a withdrawal of the contract offer. (Every effort will be made to contact a student who does not respond within this time frame.)

(e) "PreTrax" completes the background check.

(f) Student employment services office reviews the background check reports on the "PreTrax" website and records successfully completed checks. All background checks that identify criminal activity will be referred to the graduate dean/designee for their review.

(g) Student employment services office will also monitor the reports on the "PreTrax" website and be able to see if students have not responded to the e-mail from "PreTrax" to initiate their background check. Follow up e-mails will be sent to these students.

(h) Graduate assistants may not begin work and their contract/payroll data will not be entered in "PeopleSoft"/payroll until the background check is successfully completed.

(i) If criminal activity is found in a background check, the following procedures will be followed (see investigation results and actions).

Student employment services may be reached via email at: stuemp@bgsu.edu, or phone at: 419-372-2865.

(5) Investigation result and actions

(a) Post background check decision

All background checks that identify criminal conviction will be referred to the graduate dean/designee for their review. If a background investigation reveals criminal activity, the dean/designee will consult with the chair/graduate coordinator or the director of the employing office. Together, they will determine the appropriateness of the students employment.

If necessary, at the graduate dean/designees discretion, the results of the background check may also be provided to the director of public safety or the office of general counsel to determine the appropriateness of the graduate assistant employment offer. The graduate dean may consult with other senior university executives as warranted, including the president. The graduate dean/designee will notify the specific graduate program and/or the director of the employing office (if it is different from the graduate program) and the graduate assistant candidate of adverse decisions.

Apart from the persons designated in this section the details of the investigation results will not be provided to any other persons.

(b) Pre-adverse action notice from "PreTrax"

If it is determined that the background check contains potentially disqualifying information the graduate dean/designee will notify "PreTrax" to proceed with a pre-adverse action notice. The pre-adverse action notice informs the candidate of the basis for disqualification, includes a copy of the report, and explains the candidates rights under the fair credit reporting act (FCRA) to appeal. The candidate has the opportunity to provide a written account of the pertinent event(s) and to dispute inaccurate information to PreTrax in accordance with applicable law. If the candidate provides information that is determined to remove or clarify the disqualifying information, the background check will be recorded as completed and satisfactory by "PreTrax" to the university.

(c) Adverse action notice

If the candidate does not respond within five business days, or if the response does not provide satisfactory evidence to record that the background check is successfully completed, the university may withdraw the offer of employment.

If the university takes adverse action, "PreTrax" will send an adverse action notice to the candidate.

Candidates denied employment as a graduate assistant based on prior criminal activity may still be admitted and register for classes, provided the graduate dean, the director of public safety and general counsel agree that the student is not viewed as a risk to the university community.

(d) Evaluating suitability for employment

In determining the withdrawal of the graduate assistant employment offer where there is a record of criminal conviction, consideration will be given to factors including: the specific duties of the position; number of offenses and circumstance of each; date of conviction; whether the conviction arose out of employment; the accuracy of the explanation of the nature and circumstances of the conviction by the applicant; the applicants explanation of events, if any; and probation or parole status.

(e) Contract offer

No graduate assistant should begin his/her contract until a satisfactory background investigation has been completed. Any contract offer shall be considered conditional until a background investigation has been completed and all other pre-employment requirements have been satisfied. Even if, prior to completion of a satisfactory criminal background check, employment is commenced in derogation of this policy, the university reserves the right to determine and confirm the employees suitability for employment and to end any employment already begun if the background check reveals disqualifying information. In the end, a student may not work without a contract and a contract is not finalized until a background check has been successfully completed.

(6) Record retention

Background check results will not be part of the student file in OnBase. Background investigation results initiated through "PreTrax" are stored with "PreTrax," located in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. The data is retained as long as BGSU has an account with "PreTrax." If the account with "PreTrax" is terminated, the data will be transferred to a portable storage device for BGSU use.

Background checks collected by departments as part of the admissions process will be retained in the department in accordance with their approved records retention schedule.

November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-05 | Credit transfer-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria for credit transfer and restrictions on transfer or approval of credit.

(B) Policy

(1) Transfer of BGSU graduate credit taken as an advanced undergraduate

Students who have been fully admitted into a graduate degree program or graduate certificate program may count up to nine hours of graduate credit earned as a BGSU advanced undergraduate. Students must have earned a grade of A or B for this to be allowed. Specific graduate programs may have additional limitations on the number of credits that can be approved, and the specific courses which are eligible. Students should refer to specific graduate program descriptions for details of these limitations.

(2) Internal graduate credit

If appropriate to both programs and within time-to-degree rules, courses may be applied to both a certificate and a master's program, or to both a certificate and a doctoral program.

(3) Transfer of external graduate credit

Students who have been fully admitted into a graduate degree program or graduate certificate program, and have satisfactorily completed eight hours of graduate work at Bowling Green state university may petition to transfer graduate credit from another regionally accredited graduate school. Fully documented petitions for acceptance of transfer credits from non-regionally accredited institutions may be submitted for review provided: the student initiates the petition, and provides all documentation to the academic department; the petition is endorsed by the department before being submitted to the graduate college for final approval. An official transcript must be received by the graduate college before credit can be approved for transfer. Credit may be transferred only for courses in which the student received the grades of A or B (or the equivalent for courses not graded, as determined by the graduate coordinator). Credit for an S grade may be transferred only if the grade is regarded by the grading school as B or better. Courses taken for "professional development" cannot be transferred for graduate credit.

The transfer of credit received for such external courses to satisfy requirements of a degree program at BGSU depends upon the following:

(a) A formal, written petition by the student is required for the transfer of credit. The petition is submitted to the students academic program for its consideration and recommendation. The recommendation of the department is forwarded to the dean designate of the graduate college for a decision.

(b) Documentation is required for courses that are "external" or "nonresident" offerings of another university. The course must be listed and described in the catalog offerings or other official publications of the institution. The content of the course must satisfy a requirement in a graduate degree program at the offering institution and be able to satisfy a degree requirement at BGSU. An official transcript is required at BGSU.

(c) Petitions for acceptance of "summer tour" or "travel" type courses* must be fully documented so that their academic integrity can be judged. Promotional literature from a tour or travel agency or institutional sponsor is not considered documentation of the academic character of the course. Minimal documentation submitted by the student should include the following:

(i) A photocopy of the course description from the graduate catalog or other official literature of the sponsoring institution;

(ii) A statement in the institutions graduate catalog or signed by the dean designate of the graduate school that specifies the graduate degree programs in which the course satisfies degree requirements in the institution offering the course. A viable alternative is a copy of an evaluative statement concerning the course from the department(s) in which it is used to satisfy graduate degree credit;

(iii) An official transcript from the sponsoring institution following completion of the course. Transcripts "issued to student" will not be accepted.

(d) It is necessary for a student to petition, in writing, through the academic department for such transfer after the course has been completed. Prior guarantees of any type that a course will be transferable cannot be given. Any prior assurances given by faculty members or staff of Bowling Green state university must be regarded as estimates or opinions. They do not commit the university to a course of action.

*The minimal documentation on "tour courses" is necessary to evaluate the quality of the course and to determine its applicability to a students degree program. Many accredited graduate schools offer courses for personal and professional development that carry graduate credit but are not applicable to their degree programs. Official assurance is required.

(4) Restrictions on transfer or approval of credit

Transfer of credit is not appropriate for graduate, non-degree students; by definition, they have no graduate degree program toward which credit is to be transferred. The transfer of credit for any graduate student for purposes of consolidating transcripts is not allowed. If a graduate non-degree student later becomes admitted to a graduate degree program, transfer of credit can be requested in consultation with the graduate coordinator of the program. Conditionally admitted students must achieve regular status before petitioning for transfer of credit. Final approval for transferred credit is granted only by the graduate dean designate.

The time limits for completion of a masters degree, a specialist degree and certificate program (six years), and for a doctoral degree (eight years) apply also to transfer credit. That is, all credits within a masters and specialist program must fall within the six-year period dating from the end of the earliest course used to fulfill degree requirements on the tentative degree program or degree audit; similarly, all credits within a doctoral program must fall within the eight-year period.

Once the request for transfer of credit has been approved by the academic program and the graduate college, and official transcripts are received, the credit hoursnot gradesfor the courses are transferred into the students degree program. Because the grades are not officially recognized, they cannot be counted into a students cumulative grade point average. Transfer credit is reviewed at the time of graduation to ensure the course work falls within the time to degree limits.

Courses equivalent to those at the university from another university cannot be transferred for credit and also taken for credit here (course duplication is not allowed). Only graduate level courses qualify for transfer to graduate degree programs. Courses that have already been applied in whole or in part in any way toward any other degree or certificate from another university may not be transferred.

A maximum of nine semester hours of graduate credit taken as a BGSU advanced undergraduate may be counted towards a masters program subject to the approval of the masters program.

One course, up to a maximum of four semester hours of post-baccalaureate credit may be transferred into a graduate certificate.

A maximum of nine semester hours of post-baccalaureate credit may be transferred into a master's program subject to approval of the program and the graduate college.

A maximum of nine semester hours of post-master's credit may be transferred into a doctoral program subject to approval of the program and the graduate college.

Exceptions to the above maximums pertain to approved joint and cooperative degree programs with another university (see joint and cooperative degrees policy).

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-06 | Doctoral requirements-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes requirements for doctoral degrees.

(B) Policy

(1) Doctoral requirements

(a) Doctor of philosophy, doctor of education, and doctor of musical arts

(i) Admission

A student is admitted as a doctoral applicant upon approval by the departmental doctoral committee and the dean designate of the graduate college. Admission as a doctoral applicant does not imply admission to candidacy.

(ii) Residence requirements

The inclusion of the graduate college doctoral residence requirement for individual programs should be left to the discretion of the program. Whatever policy is established must be applied consistently to all applicants/students.

A student is considered to be in residence when registered on campus as a graduate student. The minimum residence requirement beyond the masters degree or equivalent may be met by satisfactorily completing fifteen hours of course work (not 7990 research) on the main campus in no more nor fewer than two consecutive terms with at least three hours of registration in either of the two terms. The residence requirements of individual departments may exceed this minimum requirement.

(iii) Credit hour requirements

Students must complete at least sixty semester hours of graduate credit beyond the masters degree or ninety semester hours beyond the bachelors degree. These hours must include at least sixteen hours of dissertation research (no more than thirty are applicable to the degree). The rest of the students course of study is designed, with the advice of the students doctoral committee, to meet the students needs and interests.

Unless a degree program has been specifically approved by the Ohio board of regents as an off-campus graduate degree program, a student must complete at least fifty-one percent of the graduate course work on the main campus of the university, as distinguished from Firelands branch campus or an extension center.

The policy concerning transfer of credit from other institutions into graduate degree programs at the university is described in this catalog under "academic regulations."

(iv) 5000-level courses

For doctoral-level students, the number of 5000-level credits that may be counted toward the minimum required hours (sixty post-masters) for the doctoral degree shall not exceed ten hours or three courses in post-masters studies.

(v) Doctoral committee

A dissertation committee must have at least three members (including the chair) from the students program and a graduate faculty representative. A non-voting committee member (known as a "reader") does not count toward the minimum number of members required by the students program. Doctoral students may change committee members after passing the preliminary examination, provided the changes are approved by the graduate coordinator, and the graduate dean (or the deans designate) is notified of the change.

The dissertation committee chair must have graduate faculty status at the regular I level. All other committee members should be regular or provisional graduate faculty. If a committee member is not on the graduate faculty, he or she may be eligible for a courtesy appointment to the graduate faculty. To request a courtesy appointment, the department chair or program director must write a letter to the graduate dean, accompanied by the appropriate documentation indicating the scholarly expertise of the individual for whom the courtesy appointment is being sought.

(vi) Graduate faculty representative

The graduate college appoints one graduate faculty representative to each doctoral students committee from the list of qualified members of the regular graduate faculty.

All members of the regular graduate faculty are eligible for appointment regardless of whether their program area offers a graduate degree. Thus, prior experience as a dissertation advisor is not a prerequisite for serving as a graduate faculty representative on doctoral committees.

The graduate dean designate attempts to rotate these assignments to ensure broad participation among the members of the regular graduate faculty.

Although the graduate faculty representative is not assigned as a subject matter expert, the representative may have general familiarity with the disciplinary area of the student. In cases where an individual graduate student (or the students doctoral committee) feels the need for an interdisciplinary contribution from a faculty member outside the students program area; such an individual may be included on the students doctoral committee in addition to the graduate faculty representative appointed by the dean designate.

In general, the graduate faculty representative to a doctoral committee has two primary responsibilities:

(a) To assure that all minimum standards of the graduate college, both written and implied, have been met in all aspects of the preliminary examination process and in the writing of the dissertation; and

(b) To ensure that the student is treated fairly and equitably in all aspects of the exam and dissertation processes.

The graduate faculty representative on preliminary examination and dissertation committees is a full member and must be a participant in all deliberations and actions. As it is for any member of the committee, results of examinations conducted without the participation of the representatives are not acceptable. The representative is expected to contribute to the examinations of a candidate in order to ensure the graduate college of the satisfactory quality of the students performance. The representative is therefore expected to read and critique the dissertation. Any comments and suggestions are to carry equal weight with those of all other committee members. The representative is not to sign the dissertation unless the suggestions have been considered, the questions have been answered, and there is evidence that the student has successfully completed the requirements for the doctoral degree.

The appointment of the graduate faculty representative should be made before the preliminary examination is taken; the representative may assist in the preparation of the examination.

The graduate faculty representative is responsible for monitoring both the content and form of the material under review. This monitoring includes an assessment of the academic quality of the written examination, the oral examination, and the dissertation manuscript.

The procedures associated with the administration of the examination and the dissertation defense are also the province of the graduate faculty representative. Under this procedural category are included such considerations as appropriate scheduling and notification of committee meetings, distribution of material in advance of committee meetings, and the protection of the students rights.

(vii) Examinations

All doctoral students must take a preliminary examination, administered by their preliminary examination committee. Some departments also require students to take qualifying examinations at an earlier stage in the doctoral process. Students must contact their department or departmental graduate coordinator for specific details.

(viii) Preliminary examination

This examination is both written and oral. The student may request permission to take this examination after having:

(a) Removed any conditions upon admission;

(b) Completed or approached completion of at least sixty hours in the approved course of study beyond the bachelors degree; and

(c) Achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least three point zero on all graduate work, including work at the masters level. The request to take the examination, approved by the graduate coordinator, must be filed in the office of the graduate college at least four weeks prior to the date of the examination. The graduate college will appoint a graduate faculty representative to participate in the examination and dissertation once the examination request has been filed.

For a student to pass the comprehensive, preliminary, or final examination, the committee must either cast a unanimous vote or a vote with one dissenter. If the committee decides to pass the candidate with conditions, the conditions must be met before the exam is recorded as satisfactory. These conditions must be conveyed in writing to the graduate college.

(ix) Re-examination

If the student fails the preliminary examination, he or she may (after a lapse of six months or more) take a second examination upon the recommendation of the departmental doctoral committee. Dismissal from the doctoral program will result if the second examination is failed.

(x) Candidacy

After completing the foreign language requirement, where required, and passing the preliminary examination, a student may achieve candidacy by securing approval for the dissertation topic from the graduate coordinator, the departmental doctoral committee, and the graduate college.

Depending upon program guidelines, the composition of this committee may be similar to or different from the preliminary examination committee. However, in all instances, the graduate faculty representative appointed to the preliminary examination committee also serves on the dissertation committee.

Students should begin registering for dissertation research (7990) at the time when they begin planning their dissertation. Students who register for dissertation research are required to maintain continuous registration in dissertation research from one semester to another, regardless of whether they are in residence, until the research is completed and the dissertation is accepted by the graduate college. Students are not required to register for dissertation research during summer sessions unless they use university services. However, they must enroll in dissertation research for the summer term in which they graduate. The minimum continuous registration for a dissertation student is one hour per semester. A student who has completed the hours designated for dissertation research in the TDP/DARS but has not completed the dissertation is required to register for at least one hour each semester until the degree is granted.

Students who do not maintain continuous registration will be required to make up for all terms they have missed. Tuition will be assessed at the current rates when the registration is processed.

A doctoral student must register for a minimum of sixteen credits of dissertation research (7990) as a degree requirement.

(xi) Final examination (dissertation defense)

Each candidate must pass a final oral examination, also called a dissertation defense, which is administered by the dissertation committee. The examination covers the dissertation and may also cover directly related fields of study. A written examination may be required at the discretion of the committee.

Because the dissertation defense is traditionally a public defense of research, the student is required to publicize the date to the campus community, three weeks before the final oral examination is to be held.

(xii) Retaking the final exam

If a student does not pass the dissertation defense, he or she may take a second examination, upon the recommendation of the dissertation committee, four months or more after the date of the first examination. No student is permitted to take the final examination more than twice.

(xiii) Deadlines

Students must be aware of deadlines established by the graduate college and published on the graduate college web site. Specifically, the following procedures should be followed:

(a) Formal application for graduation with the doctoral degree must be filed by the published deadline prior to the commencement at which the student expects to receive the degree.

(b) Copies of the final draft of the dissertation should be submitted to the dissertation committee sufficiently prior to the date set for the final examination to allow for a rigorous and careful reading of the manuscript by the committee. The graduate coordinator or program handbook should be consulted for this deadline.

(c) A student must pass the final examination by the published deadline prior to the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred. A student should be registered at the time he or she takes the oral examination.

(d) The final, error-free dissertation must be electronically submitted via "OhioLINK" by the published deadline.

(e) A signed thesis/dissertation defense and manuscript approval form must be on file in the graduate college by the published deadline.

(xiv) Publication of dissertation

Upon accepting the dissertation and the abstract, the dissertation committee certifies approval for publication. The graduate council approved the implementation of electronic submission of theses and dissertations beginning with Fall 2005 for all graduate programs. With the exception of theses written in the MFA program in creative writing, paper copies are no longer accepted by the graduate college. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the student to format and upload their document to the "OhioLINK" ETD. Details for how the student initiates this process on their own may be found on the graduate college website at http://www.bgsu.edu/graduate/thesis-and-dissertations/ submission-and-approval-of-your-manuscript.html

(b) Consortium Ph.D. in technology management

The college of technology, architecture and applied engineering is a member of a consortium that offers the Ph.D. in technology management through Indiana state university. Other member institutions are university of central Missouri, east Carolina university, and north Carolina A&T state university. The degree consists of a research core, dissertation, a general technology core, a specialization, and an internship. Cognates are typically formed from masters course work. The areas of specialization are: construction management, digital communication systems, human resource development and industrial training, manufacturing systems, and quality systems. Most of the graduate course work is accomplished via distance technology; however, a short residency requirement must be satisfied. For additional information contact the college of technology, architecture and applied engineering, at (419) 372-7613, or check the website for current information, www.indstate.edu/consortphd/.

(c) Interdisciplinary doctoral degree

The interdisciplinary studies degree option is a response to increasing interest by students and faculty in an interdisciplinary approach to graduate study and scholarship. It is available to students who have been admitted to a doctoral degree program, but who have unique educational needs that cannot be met within a single degree program. It is limited to those areas in which sufficient faculty and adequate material resources exist to support the proposed course of study.

Any student who has been admitted to a doctoral degree program and who is interested in pursuing the Interdisciplinary Studies degree option may develop a proposal under the direction of a faculty advisory committee representing each program or major area of scholarship identified in the proposed interdisciplinary course of study. The course of study must be one that is not available through an existing program, must be at the level (i.e., masters, specialist, or doctoral) of the program to which the student has been admitted, and must combine at least two different graduate degree areas which offer the graduate degree at the doctoral level. The faculty advisory committee must include a minimum of four members of the graduate faculty for a doctoral student.

Students submit their proposals to the graduate college in accordance with the "petition for interdisciplinary degree options guidelines," available at the graduate college.

The transcript of doctoral students pursuing the interdisciplinary degree option will designate the doctoral degree in the field of interdisciplinary studies with a specialization noted in two or more areas.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-07 | Enrollment and registration-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes graduate enrollment and registration policies.

(B) Policy

(1) Enrollment and registration

(a) Registration deadlines

Students must make a formal application for admission to the graduate college prior to registering for classes in order to receive graduate credit.

The university requests that all graduate students register for classes at the designated time listed on the registrar's office web site. This process will allow early evaluation of low enrollment courses and the possible cancellation of sections. Register early to ensure that the graduate courses you are planning to take are offered.

Registration may be completed at academic departments, on the web through "MyBGSU" (with a BGSU account), or at the office of registration and records, 110 administration building. Students who register during continuing student registration will be billed by the bursar. In-person registrations after fees are due must be paid by the last business day prior to the start of the term. Funded students will automatically be prepaid.

Graduate students who use university services must be regularly registered for credit.

(b) Credit hour load

A full-time graduate student is defined as a student registered for eight semester hours.

Additional credit hour requirements for holding an assistantship can be found in the college assistantship policies of the graduate college website. Audits do not count toward minimum registration loads. Graduate assistants completing a masters thesis or a doctoral dissertation should consult their advisers for appropriate registration requirements.

Excess credit hour loads (beyond eighteen hours in an academic semester or beyond the twelve-hour limit for summer) require approval from the dean designate of the graduate college. An excess credit fee of two hundred (one hundred fifty- Firelands) is charged for each hour of enrollment in excess of eighteen hours effective Spring semester 2010.

(c) Graduate concurrent registration/enrollment

Bowling Green state university and the university of Toledo offer graduate students enrolled in a degree program, the unique opportunity to enhance their academic experience by taking advantage of resources provided by the participating institutions through the graduate concurrent enrollment program. After receiving the approval of their graduate coordinator (BGSU)/advisor (UT) and participating graduate dean designates, students in the concurrent enrollment Program may take coursework at the host institution and receive credit on their home institutions official transcript.

BGSU students who enroll in the concurrent graduate program at UT are required to complete a minimum of fifty-one per cent of the courses in their graduate degree program on the BGSU main campus. Part-time graduate students who participate in the program pay the instructional and, if applicable, the nonresident fees at the host institution on a per-hour basis.

Instructional and non-resident tuition fees will be waived by UT for a BGSU student who pays full-time instructional and non-resident fees as a graduate student or has been awarded a tuition scholarship grant through a graduate assistantshipbased on the credit hours awarded.

A BGSU full-time graduate student is defined as one who is registered for eight graduate credits hours per term. A UT full-time graduate student will need to be verified by UT. If the students registration goes below the minimum credit hours defined at the home institution (i.e., withdraws from courses during the term), then the student will be billed retroactively by the host institution and their grades at the host institution may be withheld. At BGSU, for fee paying purposes, the minimum credit hours is defined as twelve. If a BGSU students total enrollment for the term is in excess of eighteen hours, effective Spring semester 2010, an excess credit fee of two hundred dollars is charged for each additional hourstarting with the nineteenth hour of registration. The student may be charged an excess fee retroactively from their home institution.

Graduate students who have been awarded an assistantship at BGSU may enroll for a maximum of six credits per term at the host institution with a tuition scholarship grant for instructional and nonresident fees. However, a tuition scholarship grant can only be provided at the host institution when registration at the home institution represents at least two-thirds of the total (home + host) registration for the academic term.

Graduate students from BGSU or UT who seek to enroll under the concurrent registration agreement must submit a completed concurrent enrollment application form (see concurrent enrollment) through the home institution. Not completing this form may result in holds on grades, registration, and transcript records. The graduate application fee, admission fee, transcripts, test scores, and letters of recommendation are not required.

The concurrent enrollment application must be approved by both the home and host institutions; the concurrent enrollment application does not register the student for the approved course(s) to be taken at the host institution. It is the students responsibility to register at the host institution prior to the beginning of the term specified on the application. For information on registration procedures at the host institution, consult the host institutions website or contact the host registrars office. Regardless of any registration at the host institution, a student must register for a minimum of one credit hour at the home institution to remain in good academic standing.

(d) Auditing a class

Students who wish to attend a class without receiving credit for it may register to audit that course. A per-hour instructional fee is charged as if the student had registered for the course for credit. Audits do not count toward minimum registration loads, nor do they satisfy degree requirements. Please see changes in registration in this policy.

(e) Changes in registration

The graduate college will not approve an add of a regularly scheduled class nor the change to or from an audit after the first fourteen calendar days of fall and spring semester or the first three calendar days of each summer session. After these dates exceptions may be granted only by the dean designate of the graduate college.

(f) Withdrawing from a course after the drop date

A grade of "W" (withdrawn) is given, if a student withdraws from a course after the last day to drop (see drop/add policy) but before the twelfth week of a course in a fifteen week session. For summer and all other sessions, a "W" is assigned if a student withdraws after completing at least thirteen percent but not more than eighty percent of the session.

A grade of "WF" (withdrawn failing) is assigned if the student withdraws after the intervals described above, stops attending (including failing to take the final exam) without processing a withdrawal, or has never attended and fails to process a withdrawal.

It is the students responsibility to initiate the withdrawal process within the students college office.

A student who officially withdraws from the university receives a "W" in all courses for the semester, unless the student has previously withdrawn from a course with a "WF."

These provisions apply to all grading options, including "S/U." The grade of "WF" is used with zero quality points in computing the grade point average; "W" is not used in computing the grade point average.

(g) Dismissal/withdrawal from a course

The university reserves the right to withdraw any graduate student from any course when the students continuance is not in the interest of the student, the class, or the university. The dismissal of a graduate student from a course and the grade and/or notation in the official record is determined by the dean designate of the graduate college after consultation with the instructor of the course. Students have the right of appeal as prescribed in the student affairs handbook.

(h) Cancellation of registration

The students class schedule may be cancelled if the fees and charges are not paid prior to the beginning of each semester.

(i) Withdrawal from the university

Students who wish to withdraw from the university in good standing must obtain the permission of the dean designate of the graduate college. After classes begin, a student who drops all classes (even if enrolled for only one class) must withdraw from the university at the graduate college. If a student leaves the university without proper notice and permission, he or she receives a grade of WF in all courses and is not entitled to any refund of fees.

(j) Courses for graduate credit

All courses numbered 5000 through 7000 carry graduate credit. As a matter of policy, no courses numbered lower than 5000 carry graduate credit. Courses not approved for graduate credit cannot be taken and then added to a students degree program for graduate credit. A graduate student who is enrolled in a graduate class open to undergraduates (4000/5000 courses) is required to do additional work of an individual nature to earn graduate credit for the course. The instructor is responsible for designating the type and amount of such work, but the graduate student must take the initiative in arranging for it within the first week of the term.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-08 | Financial information and assistance-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes graduate student fees and expenses, methods of payment, assistantships, fellowships, and other aid, in addition to off-campus housing, supplemental employment, and federal student aid.

(B) Policy

(1) Fees and expenses

Please visit the office of the bursars website at http://www.bgsu.edu/bursar.html for a current listing of all board-approved fees and amounts.

(2) Methods of payment

For more information on payment plan options, please visit: http://www.bgsu.edu/bursar/payment-plan-options.html.

(3) Late payment fees/service charges/delinquent accounts

Students experiencing financial difficulties should contact the office of the bursar promptly to arrange for payment of their outstanding balance and to avoid any further collection activity. Visit: http://www.bgsu.edu/bursar/payment-policy/collection-processes.html for further information.

(4) Refund of fees

For specific information regarding the process of refunding fees, visit: http://www.bgsu.edu/bursar/refund-options.html.

(5) Assistantships and scholarships

(a) Graduate assistantships

Graduate students with service assistantships (i.e., teaching, research, and housing) work a maximum of twenty hours per week (or the standard hours outlined in the contract) during the contracted period.

(b) Programs may offer students funding for up to two academic years (twenty-four consecutive months) at the masters level and up to four years (fourty-eight consecutive months) at the doctoral level. Programs may offer students funding for up to three academic years (thirty-six consecutive months) if the student is enrolled in a dual masters degree program or two concurrent masters degree programs at BGSU.

To retain an appointment, graduate assistants must be regularly enrolled degree-seeking students, must make satisfactory progress toward a degree, and must perform duties satisfactorily according to the terms of the appointment. Additional requirements are listed in the graduate college assistantship policy on the graduate college website. A students funding is terminated if he or she is suspended for ethical or legal misconduct as specified in the student code.

(c) Tuition scholarships

Tuition scholarships are awarded separate from any GA stipend position. Scholarship dollars can be used for tuition payment and may never be used as compensation for services. Scholarships can be used towards graduate credit hours that satisfy requirements for the degree. Tuition scholarships do not cover any student fees.

For more information, see https://www.bgsu.edu/ graduate/graduateassistantships/college-assistantship-policies.html.

(d) Oral proficiency for graduate assistants/fellows who provide classroom-related services and whose native language is not English

According to BGSU policy and section 3345.281 of the Revised Code, all graduate assistants who serve in instructional capacities (teaching, tutoring, laboratory sections, etc.) who are not native speakers of English must demonstrate that they are orally proficient in the English language prior to working with students. Prospective graduate assistants who fulfill the above listed instructional responsibilities (here forward referred to as teaching assistants) can demonstrate this proficiency by either providing an appropriate TOEFL iBT score or by completing the ESOL programs spoken English test (SET).*

It is the responsibility of each department to ensure that all non-native English speaking teaching assistants receive clearance before beginning their assistantship duties and that all teaching assistants who are required to take ITA classes do so in the appropriate semesters. Departments should refer to the procedures posted on the ESOL programs website.

*Teaching assistants/associates who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents only need to demonstrate English proficiency if they do not have an undergraduate/graduate degree from a U.S. institution.

For more information about graduate assistantships, visit: http://www.bgsu.edu/graduate/graduate-assistantships.html.

(e) Graduate hall director

Graduate hall directors may receive graduate assistantships as part of their compensation for their work. For job description, application process, and FAQs, please see: https://www.bgsu.edu/residence-life/employment-opportunities/graduate-residence-hall-director-information.html.

(f) Additional employment

Because academic success is the primary goal of graduate study, graduate assistants are discouraged from working more than twenty hours per week, including the assistantship appointment, when classes are in session. Graduate assistants should confer with their graduate coordinators before accepting additional employment, whether on or off campus. Federal regulations strictly prohibit international students from working more than twenty hours per week.

Additional campus employment may be sought through student employment services website available at: https://www.bgsu.edu/student-employment-services. html. Domestic students are not permitted to work more than twenty-eight hours per week among all on-campus employment positions combined. Additionally, federal regulations strictly prohibit international students from working more than twenty hours per week.

(g) Federal student aid

Regularly admitted students who are U.S. citizens, U.S. permanent residents, as well as some eligible non-citizens can apply for federal student aid through www.fafsa.gov. Please see https://www.bgsu.edu/ financial-aid/graduate-and-professional-students.html for more information.

Students who are admitted in a graduate non-degree status are typically not eligible for federal student aid because federal regulations require students be enrolled in an eligible academic program for the purpose of obtaining a degree or be enrolled in an approved certificate program. More information about federal aid eligibility requirements, as well as exceptions for some graduate non-degree students can be found here: http://www.bgsu.edu/registration-records/admission-services/graduate-graduate-non-degree.html.

For further details regarding the financial aid process please visit http://www.bgsu.edu/graduate/financial-aid.html.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-09 | Grading policies-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes grading policies and incomplete policy.

(B) Policy

(1) Unit of credit

The unit of credit is the semester hour which is ordinarily earned by one hour of recitation or lecture a week per semester.

Depending upon the amount of outside preparation required two or three hours of laboratory work carry the same credit as one hour of recitation or lecture.

(2) Grading system

The following system of marks is used in reporting and recording a graduate students proficiency in courses:

(a) A 4.00 points

(b) B 3.00 points

(c) C 2.00 points

(d) D 1.00 points

(e) F 0.00 points

(f) WF withdraw failing 0.00 points

Some courses are graded on an S/U (satisfactory/unsatisfactory) basis and are so indicated in the individual course descriptions. A grade of S is equivalent to a letter grade of B or higher (with the exception of 6910, 6990, or 7990). If a graduate course has been approved for S/U grading, a graduate student is not eligible to receive a letter grade in that course.

A course taken for graduate credit in which the grade of D, F, or U is received may not be used to meet degree requirements or to meet the minimum credit hour requirements for a graduate degree. Students should consult their academic program for any other requirements.

Prior to Spring 2018, grades for courses numbered 6910, 6990, and 7990 are reported as IP (in progress) until the completed final capstone experience or experiences (e.g., research paper, portfolio, or academic equivalent), thesis, or dissertation is approved when the final grade of S (satisfactory) is substituted.

Starting Spring 2018, grades for courses numbered 6910, 6990, and 7990 are graded on an S/U basis only. A grade of S in one of these courses denotes satisfactory progress that semester, and a grade of U in one of these courses denotes unsatisfactory progress that semester, based on criteria determined at the program level. The evaluation of the final experience, thesis, or dissertation is an independent judgment of the final status of the experience, thesis, or dissertation, and is independent from S or U grades earned.

Masters students are not permitted to use any 6990 thesis credits toward their plan II requirements, regardless of the grade received.

(3) Letter grading versus S/U grading options graduate courses

Unlike undergraduate courses, each graduate course is approved by the university for either letter or S/U grading. Neither students nor instructors have the option to decide if a course is S/U or letter graded.

(4) Grading options undergraduate courses

Graduate students who take undergraduate courses are graded according to the undergraduate grading system. Such students receive a letter grade unless they register to be graded on an S/U basis. Regardless of the grading option, undergraduate courses taken by graduate students are not calculated in the graduate GPA.

(5) Incomplete policy

An INC (incomplete) may be given only when, , a student fails to fulfill a specified requirement in a course.

An incomplete may be given at the discretion of the instructor, only with the agreement of the student (exceptions may be considered on a case by case basis). The instructor should notify the student of the deadline and expectations for completion.

An INC may be removed and a grade substituted if the student completes course requirements to the satisfaction of the instructor prior to the deadline established by the graduate college (or prior to an earlier deadline established by the instructor). The graduate college deadlines for removal of incomplete grades for the respective academic semesters are:

(a) Fall semester: March first

(b) Spring semester: August first

(c) Summer semester: November first

For an extension of the deadline, the student must make a written request to the instructor. If the instructor agrees, the instructor must petition their academic dean or designate for such consideration in writing prior to the expiration of the deadline stated in this rule.

For courses taken for a letter grade, any mark of INC not removed by these deadlines will change to F. For courses taken S/U, any mark of INC not removed by these deadlines will change to U.

A student cannot graduate with a grade of INC in a graduate level course. If a student receives an INC in their graduation semester, they will be removed from the graduation list. They will then need to apply for graduation in a future semester after the incomplete has been resolved.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-10 | Graduate admissions-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria and procedures for graduate admissions.

(B) Policy

(1) Admission deadlines

(a) Domestic application credentials are due no later than:

Fourteen calendar days prior to the start of the admit term

(b) International application and credential materials are due no later than:

(i) Fall admission- July fifteenth

(ii) Spring admission- November fifteenth

(iii) Summer admission- May fifteenth

(c) Academic program deadlines:

Academic programs may have their own earlier deadlines. Prospective students should check with the academic programs to which they intend to apply for specific application deadlines. Programs may refuse to consider applicants who do not comply with posted deadlines.

(d) Applicants are admitted to the graduate college for a specific term only. If an applicant wishes to begin graduate coursework earlier than the admit term, the individual must receive approval from the academic program prior to registering for classes. If an applicant wishes to begin graduate coursework later than the admit term, the individual may request a deferment for up to twelve months. The deferment request should be submitted to the graduate college and must be approved by the academic program. An applicant who has received a deferment must update and/or verify all contact information prior to initial registration.

(e) Applicants who do not enroll for the admit term or receive approval for a deferment will have their application cancelled. In order to be admitted to a subsequent term the applicant must submit a new application, including the application fee and any updated credentials.

(2) Graduate concurrent admissions

http://www.bgsu.edu/content/dam/BGSU/general-counsel/documents/ enrollment-and-registration-graduate.pdf

(3) Admissions categories

There are four graduate admission categories: regular admission, conditional admission, ELS conditional admission, and graduate non-degree.

(a) Regular admission

Applicants are eligible for regular admission to the graduate college if they have a minimum cumulative undergraduate grade point average of two point seventy-five out of four point zero or the equivalent. An academic program may also request regular admission if an applicant has a minimum grade point average of three point zero in the last sixty credits of completed undergraduate work or a grade point average of three point zero or higher in at least nine credits of graduate coursework. Admission to the graduate college is contingent upon completion of the application process, recommendation from the academic program, and approval by the dean of the graduate college.

Final official credentials must be submitted to the graduate college prior to the start of the admit term. All admissions are considered provisional until all required documents have been received. Students who fail to supply the required documents will have a registration hold placed on their accounts for any subsequent term of enrollment until they are received.

(b) Conditional admission

Applicants who do not meet the listed criteria for regular admission, or have deficiencies in other admissions criteria, are not eligible for regular admission to the graduate college. However, conditional admission status may be granted with the recommendation of the academic program and approval by the dean of the graduate college. Applicants admitted conditionally must earn a minimum cumulative grade point average of three point zero in the first nine graded graduate hours completed (e.g., no S/U or audit). Academic programs may specify additional requirements of students granted conditional admission status. Please note that international students cannot be issued an I-20 from BGSU based on a conditional admission.

If a cumulative grade point average of three point zero is not achieved in the first nine graded graduate hours completed, the student shall be dismissed from the program and the graduate college.

A student who has been conditionally admitted is not eligible for a graduate assistantship or scholarship until regular status has been achieved, unless an exception has been requested by the academic program and approved by the graduate college.

(c) ELS conditional admission

Prospective international students may be granted an ELS conditional admission if they enroll in an ELS language center and work toward successfully completing level 112 from an ELS language center rather than submit TOEFL or IELTS scores. Students enrolled at the ELS may apply for regular admission after successfully completing ELS level 112. While enrolled at ELS, students may not enroll in academic courses at BGSU or receive a graduate assistantship or scholarship. Furthermore, ELS conditional admission does not guarantee admission to a graduate program.

(d) Graduate non-degree status

Graduate non-degree status allows students to pursue personal or professional goals by taking graduate courses without enrolling in a certificate or degree program. Admission to graduate non-degree status and successful completion of non-degree course work neither indicates nor assures subsequent admission to a certificate or degree program, nor does it qualify a student for financial aid.

A graduate non-degree student who wishes to be considered for admission to a certificate or degree program should follow the procedures outlined in the next section, "degree program admission requirements."

Some courses completed while on graduate non-degree status may be applied toward a degree program, contingent upon the approval of the degree program and the graduate college. The non-degree student is not limited to the number of credit hours taken at BGSU; however, only nine graduate credit hours will transfer to a graduate degree program. In high demand academic areas, degree candidates will have priority over graduate non-degree students in registering for courses. Some specialized and clinical areas of study are not available for enrollment with graduate non-degree status.

(4) Admission requirements

(a) Degree program admission requirements

Applicants to graduate degree programs at the university must possess a bachelors degree from a regionally accredited college or university and present evidence of broad and thorough undergraduate preparation that indicates probable success in graduate study. Academic programs may have higher admission criteria and standards upon which admissions decisions are made. Prospective students should check with the academic programs to which they intend to apply for specific criteria.

An applicant to a degree program will be evaluated for admission when the following materials are submitted to the graduate college:

(i) The application for admission;

(ii) A non-refundable application fee of forty-five dollars for domestic students and seventy-five dollars for international students (for each application submitted);

(iii) Standardized test scores as specified below (e.g., GRE, PRAXIS II, GMAT);

(iv) Test of English as a foreign language (TOEFL), Michigan English language assessment battery (MELAB), pearson test of English (PTE), and international English language testing system (IELTS) for all whose first language is not English;

(v) A copy of an unofficial transcript from each institution attended must be uploaded at the time of application. Applicants must include all institutions attended regardless of the number or type of credits taken, terms attended, or whether transfer credits are reflected on another transcript. Bowling Green state university transcripts do not need to be submitted; and

(vi) Upon admission, an official transcript must be forwarded directly to the graduate college from every institution where a degree was earned. If the degree has not yet been conferred, final official transcripts (showing the date and degree earned) are required to be submitted to the graduate college as a condition of admission. Personal copies of transcripts are not acceptable. Transcripts "issued to student" are acceptable only if in a sealed envelope with the registrars stamp.

Applicants must submit all materials directly to:

Graduate college, 120 McFall center, Bowling Green state university, Bowling Green, OH, USA, 43403,gradinfo@bgsu.edu

(5) Graduate non-degree admission requirements

Applicants seeking admission as a non-degree graduate student must submit:

(a) A completed non-degree application for admission form;

(b) An unofficial transcript, showing highest degree earned. If no transcript is received with the application, verification of the highest degree earned will be undertaken by the office of registration and records. Applications may be submitted to the office of registration and records, 110 administration building, Bowling Green, OH 43403.

Graduate non-degree status applicants are not required to pay the application fee.

(6) Required tests

See graduate program specifics for required standardized test (GRE GMAT, and PRAXIS II or a state approved teacher licensure exam).

(a) Graduate record examinations (GRE)

Unless otherwise indicated by specific program requirements, all applicants for admission to a graduate degree program must submit valid scores (scores obtained within the last five years) from the GRE general test to the graduate college. Some degree programs require scores from a subject test. Please refer to the individual program descriptions in this catalog to determine which programs require this information. The GRE is administered by the educational testing service. The current GRE Information and registration bulletin is available on-line at www.gre.org.

(b) Graduate management admission test (GMAT)

Valid GMAT scores are required (scores must be obtained within the last five years). The GMAT is administered by the graduate management admission council (GMAC). The current GMAT bulletin of information and registration form is available on-line at www.mba.com.

(c) The Praxis series

Programs that accept the PRAXIS score require applicants to submit Praxis II (NTE) scores (valid for ten years). The current Praxis information is available on-line at www.ets.org.

(d) TOEFL, MELAB, PTE, and IELTS

Valid TOEFL, MELAB, PTE, or IELTS scores (obtained within the last two years) are required of all applying for admission whose first language is not English. For more information, see www.ets.org, http://cambridgemichigan.org/test-takers/tests/melab/, https://pearsonpte.com/, or www.ielts.org.

Official TOEFL, MELAB, PTE, or IELTS score report recommended minimums are:

(i) 80 TOEFL IBT

(ii) 77 MELAB

(iii) 53 PTE

(iv) 6.5 IELTS

Applicants admitted with scores below these minimums or without scores are required to take english ESOL classes within their first two semesters of enrollment. Detailed information about these requirements is available on the ESOL program and graduate college websites.

Applicants are exempt from providing standardized language proficiency test scores if they:

(a) Are US citizens;

(b) Are from a country whose population speaks english as their first language; *

(c) Have a previous degree (associates, bachelors, masters, or doctorate) from a US college/university or from a country in which instruction was delivered in english. *

*A complete list of qualifying countries can be found at: https://www.bgsu.edu/graduate/admissions.html.

Satisfactory completion of all required ESOL courses is mandatory for continued university funding and graduation. More information about the ESOL programs testing and courses is available at http://www.bgsu.edu/esol.

(e) International teaching assistants

All graduate assistants who will serve in instructional capacities (teaching, tutoring, laboratory sections, etc.) who are not native speakers of english must demonstrate that they are orally proficient in the english language prior to working with students. Please see international teaching assistant language policy graduate https://www.bgsu.edu/content/dam/BGSU/generalcounsel/ documents/international-teaching-assistant- language-online-graduate.pdf.

(7) Transferring/applying to another degree program

Students who are currently admitted to a degree program or are completing a graduate degree and wish to be considered for admission to another degree program must complete the admission process for that particular degree program. Students may need to submit a new application for admission.

The following conditions must be met before a file can be forwarded for program evaluation:

(a) A new application must be submitted to the graduate college including required fees;

(b) Required test scores and transcripts must be submitted to the graduate college (if not already on file);

(c) Any specific degree program requirements must be met;

(d) If a transfer from one degree program to another is requested, the graduate coordinator of the degree program from which the transfer is being made must be notified by the student in writing.

When acceptance to a degree program is granted, the change in admission status will become effective at the start of the admit term.

(8) Deferral

Admitted applicants to the graduate college may defer their admission one time up to one year with the permission of the graduate program coordinator in the department to which the admission was granted. Applicants whose requests are denied or wishing to be considered for a later term must reapply. Deferrals apply to admission status only.

(9) Reactivation

If a student has had no registration activity for four or more semesters (including summer), the student will not be able to register for classes.

To apply for reactivation, a student must submit a graduate program reactivation form. Reactivation is subject to the approval of both the graduate coordinator and the graduate college dean or designate.

A degree program may request additional documents prior to approving reactivation.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 11/2/2016, 2/27/2018
Rule 3341-3-11 | Graduate faculty status-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes the application process, criteria, and privileges associated with graduate faculty status.

(B) Policy

(1) Appointments to the BGSU graduate faculty

The BGSU graduate college grants two major categories of graduate faculty status (GFS), provisional and regular status (including three levels). In addition, courtesy appointments (adjunct and ad hoc) may be granted as appropriate. This document describes each categorys privileges, the process for application, and the graduate college minimum qualifications needed for each category. It also includes guidelines for the required creation of academic unit qualifications beyond the graduate college minimum criteria. It should be noted that the granting of graduate faculty status is a graduate college designation and, though obtaining and maintaining graduate faculty status may be an expectation in some units, the review and receipt of graduate faculty status is a separate process from tenure, promotion, and workload allocation. In keeping with HLC and state policies, faculty who teach and supervise doctoral students must possess the terminal degree in the field.

GFS application process- graduate faculty status applications must be approved by:

(a) The tenuring or hiring unit for TTF and NTTF, respectively;

(b) The line college dean; and

(c) The graduate college dean or designate.

Faculty may participate in graduate activities outside of the tenuring or hiring unit at the discretion of that unit. Faculty may not participate in graduate education without GFS. Retired faculty may retain graduate faculty status, if requested by their unit.

(2) Provisional appointments

Provisional appointments may be requested for new full-time BGSU faculty members (TTF and NTTF), or for continuing BGSU faculty members (TTF or NTTF) who have held graduate faculty status for less than six years, or who have not previously held graduate faculty status. These new or continuing faculty members who hold the appropriate terminal degree, or at least a master's degree in addition to additional graduate course work and/or have developed extensive experience in the profession, may be nominated by their graduate programs for provisional membership at either the level II or level III status, depending on credentials. See paragraph (B)(3) of this policy for privileges of each level.

It is expected that the provisional appointment will provide the opportunity for faculty members to acquire the necessary credentials for regular membership. Provisional status is valid for up to six years and is non-renewable. In individual cases, programs may petition the graduate dean designate to permit provisional II members to direct doctoral-level students.

(3) Regular appointments

Regular graduate faculty status (GFS) may be earned by full-time BGSU faculty after a successful provisional status period or when requested for a new full-time faculty member who is hired at the associate or full professor rank. Faculty who are not full-time may apply for adjunct status (see below). Regular graduate faculty status comprises three levels, each with its own privileges and criteria.

Criteria for regular graduate faculty status

The graduate college recognizes that the nature of research, academic scholarship, and creative productions in various departments and schools varies according to discipline; consequently, each unit will determine its criteria and performance indicators for level I, II, and III regular graduate faculty status. Each units policy document will outline its criteria for regular status, and it must meet at least the minimum standards set forth in this policy document. Minimally, these criteria and performance indicators must conform to the goals of graduate education (based on HLC and CCGS definitions of graduate-level education). Initially, the line college dean, the graduate college dean or designate, and graduate council must approve the criteria and performance indicators for each unit. Subsequently, an evaluation of each program's criteria and performance indicators will be conducted routinely as part of the program review process and/or as a part of a discipline specific accreditation review.

Each program's graduate faculty documents must include performance indicators in each of the following categories for each level: degree qualifications; scholarship and creative activity; and graduate teaching. The graduate college minimum criteria are listed in this paragraph for each category. However, individual program GFS policy documents shall expand on these minimal criteria to develop discipline/field-appropriate policies. The graduate college will provide a template for this process.

(a) Level I privileges (for regular I graduate faculty only)

(i) Chair doctoral dissertation or masters thesis committee.

(ii) Participate as a member of a thesis or dissertation committee and all other graduate responsibilities associated with both the masters and doctoral level of graduate study.

(iii) Teach graduate courses of any level (5000, 6000, 7000).

(iv) Participate as a graduate faculty representative (GFR) on dissertation committees.

(v) Represent graduate program at graduate council.

(b) Regular level I criteria

(i) Degree qualifications: members of level I status are tenure-track faculty who hold a graduate degree appropriate to their field, either the doctorate or the terminal degree for those academic areas in which the doctorate is not normally required.

(ii) Scholarship and/or creative activity: the criteria must include evidence of a continuous record of productive scholarship or creative endeavors that represents a significant contribution to the knowledge base and/or the creative practice of one's field of study. While the unit will define the type of research or creative work, the quality of that work will have been verified by a peer review process. At a minimum, the graduate college requires at least three separate pieces of academic/creative work or the equivalent during the previous six years of this reappointment.

(iii) Graduate teaching: the criteria must include evidence of active and productive participation in the instruction of graduate students. This may include activities such as teaching graduate courses, advising, course development, thesis/dissertation advising, and other activities that contribute substantially to the educational experience of graduate students.

(c) Level II privileges (for regular II and provisional II graduate faculty)

(i) Chair master's thesis committees and supervise master's plan II experiences.

(ii) Participate as a member of doctoral dissertation, qualifying exam, and preliminary exam committees, in addition to participating in master's thesis committees and plan II experiences.

(iii) Teach graduate courses at any level (5000, 6000, 7000).

(iv) Participate as a graduate faculty representative on dissertation committees.

(v) Represent graduate program at graduate council.

(d) Regular level II criteria

(i) Degree qualifications: members of level II status are full-time BGSU faculty members (specifically including tenure-track and non-tenure track) and hold a graduate degree appropriate to their field: either the doctorate or the terminal degree for those academic areas in which the doctorate is not normally required. However, in some cases, faculty without the terminal degree may demonstrate qualifications for this status when they have at least a masters degree in addition to additional graduate course work and/or have developed extensive experience in the profession for which they are expected to teach.

(ii) Scholarship and/or creative activity: the criteria must include evidence of a record of productive scholarship or creative endeavors that represents a contribution to the knowledge base and/or the creative practice of one's field of study. While the unit will define the type of research or creative work, the quality of that work will have been verified by a peer review process. At a minimum, the graduate college requires at least two separate pieces of academic/creative work or the equivalent during the previous six years of this reappointment.

(iii) Graduate teaching: the criteria must include evidence of active and productive participation in the instruction of graduate students. This may include activities such as teaching graduate courses, advising, course development, thesis/dissertation committee work, and other activities that contribute substantially to the educational experience of graduate students.

(e) Level III privileges (for regular III and provisional III graduate faculty)

(i) Participate as a non-voting reader on a thesis committee.

(ii) Teach graduate courses at the 5000 and 6000 level.

(iii) Supervise master's plan II experiences (if approved).

(iv) Participate in master's plan II experiences.

(v) Represent graduate program at graduate council.

(f) Regular level III criteria

(i) Degree qualifications: members of level III status are full-time BGSU faculty members (specifically including tenure-track and non-tenure track) and normally hold a graduate degree appropriate to their field: either the doctoral degree or the terminal degree for those academic areas in which the doctorate is not normally required. However, in some cases, faculty without the terminal degree may demonstrate qualifications for this status when they have at least a masters degree in addition to additional graduate course work and/or have developed extensive experience in the profession for which they are expected to teach.

(ii) Scholarship, creative and/or professional activity: the criteria must include evidence of scholarly, creative, or professional activity that represents a contribution to the knowledge base and/or the creative practice, or professional practice of one's field of study. The unit will define the type of scholarly, creative, or professional activity; however the graduate college expects at least one piece of scholarly/creative/professional work or the equivalent during the previous six years of this reappointment.

(iii) Graduate teaching: the criteria must include evidence of active and productive participation in the instruction of graduate students. This may include activities such as teaching graduate courses, advising, and course development.

(4) Courtesy appointments

The majority of work for graduate education at BGSU is conducted by regular or provisional graduate faculty at levels I, II, and III. However, other faculty are also called upon to provide expertise in graduate teaching and mentoring. Two categories of courtesy appointments are adjunct and ad hoc status.

(a) Adjunct appointment

The graduate college dean or designate may grant adjunct graduate faculty appointments to individuals who are not regularly and continuously on the staff full-time and do not normally receive a salary from BGSU. These individuals may be needed to teach graduate courses or serve on thesis or dissertation committees. Such adjunct appointments must have approval of the line college dean, and the graduate dean designate. Adjunct graduate faculty appointments are made for a designated time period and are renewable. The credentials of adjunct graduate faculty must be reviewed at least once every six years.

(i) Adjunct privileges

(a) If approved, serve as members of thesis and dissertation committees, supervise or participate in master's plan II experiences, or other duties.

(b) If approved, teach courses at the 5000 through 7000 levels.

(ii) Adjunct criteria

Graduate faculty adjuncts should hold a graduate degree appropriate to their field, either the doctorate or the terminal degree for those academic areas in which the doctorate is not normally required. However, in some cases, faculty without the terminal degree may demonstrate qualifications for this status when they have at least a masters degree in addition to additional graduate course work and/or have developed extensive experience in the profession for which they are expected to teach.

(b) Ad hoc appointment

BGSU employees, who otherwise do not have graduate faculty status, may be authorized to teach specific graduate courses or serve on a thesis or dissertation committee in a capacity other than chair or principal advisor. An example of ad hoc members may be administrators or ex-administrators who, because of the demands of administrative duties, do not currently meet the criteria for regular graduate faculty status. Ad hoc appointments are for one to three years and may be renewed.

(i) Ad hoc privileges

(a) If approved, serve as members of thesis and dissertation committees, supervise or participate in master's plan II experiences, or other duties.

(b) If approved, teach courses at the 5000 through 7000 levels.

(ii) Ad hoc criteria

(a) Ad hoc graduate faculty should hold a graduate degree appropriate to their field, either the doctorate or the terminal degree for those academic areas in which the doctorate is not normally required. However, in some cases, BGSU employees without the terminal degree may demonstrate qualifications for this status when they have at least a masters degree in addition to additional graduate course work and/or have developed extensive experience in the profession for which they are expected to teach.

(b) Ad hoc appointments will be made only if all of the following stipulations apply:

(i) There is a demonstrated need for the course or committee service to be conducted by the appointee nominee, and

(ii) No regular or provisional graduate faculty are available.

Authorization to teach a specific course or serve on a committee must be gained prior to the beginning of the course or the constitution of the committee.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-12 | Graduation application and minimum registration-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria for graduation application including minimum registration policy.

(B) Policy

(1) Graduation application and minimum registration

To become a candidate for a graduate degreecertificate, masters, specialist, or doctoralthe student must submit an application online by the deadline established by the graduate college.

(a)

Degree candidate deadlines are posted on the graduate college website at https://www.bgsu.edu/graduate/graduation/degree-candidates-deadlines.html. These are firm deadlines and cannot be extended.

Please read the instructions and complete the application carefully. Once you submit your application on-line, you will get a confirmation screen. You are strongly advised to print the confirmation screen for your records. Should any technical issues occur, this is proof of your application. It is the students responsibility to reapply for the next graduation if they do not meet the graduation requirements.

(2) Graduation- minimum registration requirements

Graduate college policy requires that all graduate students be registered for at least one semester hour during the semester in which they graduate.

Note: the student does not need to be registered at BGSU if they are completing revalidation or if they are attending another institution where they are taking a course listed on their TDP/DARS that will be transferred back to BGSU.

As an exception, immediately following a semester of enrollment, students who have completed all degree requirements prior to five oclock p.m. on the first day of classes in the semester they officially graduate, do not have to register for one hour of credit if they can satisfy all of the following conditions:

(a) Have enrolled in all required course work; and

(b) Have submitted an error-free copy of their dissertation or thesis to the graduate college, via "OhioLINK" (hard copy for MFA-creative writing students), for doctoral or plan I (thesis) masters students, or have completed comprehensive exam, presentation, final project, recital, portfolio, etc. if plan II (non-thesis) masters students; and will have removed all incompletes prior to the first day of classes in the semester they graduate.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 6/18/2018
Rule 3341-3-13 | Health insurance-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes health insurance requirements for graduate students.

(B) Policy

(1) Health insurance

All graduate students are required to meet the health regulations in effect at the university. All graduate students enrolled for eight or more credit hours at Bowling Green state university and all international students are required to have adequate medical insurance coverage. Students are automatically enrolled in the university-sponsored medical insurance program for the entire year once registration takes place. Domestic and international graduate students who already have coverage and wish to be exempt from purchasing the university-sponsored medical insurance or wish to be enrolled for less than one year must contact the student insurance office. International Students who wish to be exempt from purchasing the university-sponsored medical insurance or wish to enroll for less than one year must contact international programs. Alternative medical insurance coverage must meet university minimum requirements in order to be acceptable. Students also have the option of purchasing coverage for their spouses and/or dependent children through the university plan. Further information is available at http://www.bgsu.edu/student-insurance-program.html or visit the student insurance office in room 202 of the falcon health center building.

Refer to the following web site for updated information regarding international student health insurance: http://www.bgsu.edu/student-insurance-program/international-students.html.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-14 | International teaching assistant language policy-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy pertains to all graduate assistants who serve in instructional capacities and who are not native speakers of English.

(B) Policy

(1)

According to section 3345.281 of the Revised Code, all graduate assistants who serve in instructional capacities (teaching, tutoring, laboratory sections, etc.) who are not native speakers of English must demonstrate that they are orally proficient in the English language prior to serving an instructional role. Prospective graduate assistants who fulfill the listed instructional responsibilities can demonstrate this proficiency by either providing an appropriate standardized English language ) proficiency test score or by completing the ESOL programs spoken english test (SET). *

It is the responsibility of each department to ensure that all non-native English speaking graduate assistants receive clearance before beginning their assistantship duties and that all graduate assistants who are required to take ITA classes do so in the appropriate semesters. Departments should refer to the procedures posted on the ESOL programs website. (http://www.bgsu.edu/esolita).

*Graduate assistants who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents only need to demonstrate English proficiency if they do not have an undergraduate/graduate degree from a U.S. institution.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-15 | Leave of absence-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria for leave of absence for graduate students.

(B) Policy

Students may request an approved leave of absence from the university by sending a request, endorsed by the graduate coordinator, to the graduate college. A leave of absence must be for a designated period of time (typically one or more semesters), and the maximum approved leave of absence in twelve months. If a student is on an approved leave of absence, the time of the leave does not count against the six- or eight-year time limit for degree completion; the student cannot use university services during a leave of absence. Students may not take a leave of absence for the purpose of taking undergraduate courses. Students should work with the office of registration and records in regard to withdrawing from their coursework while on leave of absence.

International students requesting a leave of absence should consult the office of international student services to discuss potential impacts on immigration status.

For deployed military personnel, the graduate college "dissertation/thesis clock" will stop when a student is granted a military leave of absence for the duration of the military leave of absence and within accordance to the section 3345.53 of the Revised Code. A student will be given one additional year upon returning from a military leave of absence before the "dissertation clock" begins again. The time spent on a military leave of absence will not be counted towards the total time-to-degree, and continuous registration will not be required. Additional accommodations for graduate students returning from active duty should be requested in writing to the graduate college.

Active duty policy per section 3345.53 of the Revised Code: As used in this paragraph, "active duty" means full-time duty in the active military service of the United States, including full-time training duty, annual training duty, and active state duty for members of the national guard.

(1) Each state institution of higher education, as defined in section 3345.011 of the Revised Code, shall grant a student a military leave of absence from the institution while the student is serving on active duty, and for one year after the conclusion of that service, if the student is a member of the United States national guard or other reserve component of the armed forces of the United States, or a member of those armed forces in a retired status, and is called to active duty. The student shall not suffer an academic penalty as a result of the leave of absence.

(2) If requested by a student granted a military leave of absence pursuant to paragraph (A) of this policy not later than one year after the students release from active duty, the state institution of higher education in which the student is enrolled shall do either of the following, as elected by the student:

(a) Credit tuition and fee charges toward a subsequent academic term in an amount that is one hundred per cent of what the student paid the institution for the academic term in which the student withdraws;

(b) Refund tuition and fees paid for the academic term, provided the student withdraws before the withdraw date established by the institution. The refund shall equal one hundred per cent of the tuition and fee charges the student paid the institution for the academic term. If the student withdraws after the withdraw date established by the institution, the student is ineligible for a refund of tuition and fee charges. For the purposes of this section, the "withdraw date" shall be the same as the date set by the institution for its general student population to withdraw from the institution or a course or class without academic penalty.

(3) If requested by a student granted a military leave of absence pursuant to paragraph (A) of this policy not later than one year after the students release from active duty, the state institution of higher education shall restore the student to the educational status the student had attained prior to being called to active duty without loss of academic credits earned, scholarships or grants awarded, or tuition and other fees paid prior to the commencement of active duty, except as provided in paragraph (B) of this policy.

(4) If a state institution of higher education fails to comply with this section, the student may bring an action against the institution to enforce its provisions in the court of claims. The court may award reasonable attorneys fees and expenses if the student prevails in the action.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-16 | Master's degree-general requirements-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes general requirements for masters degree. More specific requirements can be found on department documents.

(B) Policy

(1) General requirements for the masters degree

(a) Types of programs

The specific descriptions of the respective masters degrees are given under the subheadings of master of accountancy, master of architecture, master of arts, master of arts in teaching, master of business administration, master of education, master of fine arts, master of food and nutrition, master of interdisciplinary gerontology, master of music, master of organization development, master of public administration, master of science, master of science in analytics, master of science in criminal justice, and master of technology management. Degree requirements are outlined under the degree headings listed above and in the program descriptions in the "graduate programs" section of this catalog. In several of the programs, students may pursue the degree under either a thesis option (plan I) or a non-thesis option (plan II). Students present their intention to pursue either a plan I or a plan II masters degree program at the time of submission of the TDP/DARS form to the graduate college. All masters degree programs have a culminating option (e.g., thesis, project, comprehensive exam, presentation, final project, recital, portfolio, etc.).

(b) Credit hours

All masters degree programs of the university require at least thirty semester hours of graduate course work. Specific credit hour requirements are listed under the degree and program descriptions. Students must be enrolled for at least one hour of credit in the semester in which they graduate. A student who completes all degree requirements by the end of the first day of the semester in which he or she is graduating is not required to register during the graduation semester.

(c) Level of work

At least eighteen hours of credit in the students masters degree program must be on the 6000-level or higher. Many 5000-level courses are cross-listed with 4000-level undergraduate courses. A graduate student must register for the 5000-level section of the course.

(d) Residence requirements

A minimum of twenty-four hours toward the masters degree must be earned at Bowling Green state university. Exceptions to this minimum pertain to approved joint and cooperative degree programs with another university (cf. p. 51, section entitled "joint and cooperative degrees). In joint and cooperative degree programs, up to eighteen credits may transfer. Credits earned at BGSU Firelands extension branch may apply toward the requirements for the masters degree only when the extension course is specifically given for graduate credit. Transfer credit must be in addition to the minimum of twenty-four hours earned in residence. Unless a degree program has been specifically approved by the Ohio board of regents as an off-campus graduate degree program, the individual student must complete at least fifty-one per cent of graduate course work on the main campus of the university, as distinguished from BGSU Firelands branch campus or another off campus extension center.

(e) Time limits for degree and revalidation

Candidates must complete all requirements for a masters degree within six years from the end of the earliest course used to fulfill degree requirements on the TDP/DARS. Course credits older than six years will not apply unless submitted for revalidation. Courses older than seven years may not be revalidated.

(i) Suggested timeline for one-year masters students:

(a) August - start classes

(b) January- major professor assigned, TDP/DARS completed, human subjects approved (if necessary), thesis topic approved

(c) May- apply for graduation, give final thesis draft to committee, plan I: take oral thesis exam, plan II: take comprehensive exam

(d) August -graduate

(2) Plan options for masters degrees

The two plans under which one may pursue a masters degree are designed to meet the individual needs of students who aspire to varying types of professional careers. In a sense, plan I (thesis) and plan II (non-thesis) represent different experiences. Consequently, the academic departments and the graduate college discourage switching from one plan to another.

If a student wishes to change from one plan to another after the TDP/DARS has been filed, the students request to switch must be submitted as a TDP/DARS addendum to the graduate coordinator. If approved, the graduate coordinator submits the approved TDP/DARS with written rationale from the advisor to the dean designate of the graduate college. If a switch from plan I to plan II is recommended and approved, the grade of IP (in progress) will remain for all thesis hours listed on the transcript.

A graduate student may not switch from plan I to plan II if he or she fails the final thesis examination. A graduate student may not switch from plan II to plan I if he or she fails the non-thesis evaluation (e.g., comprehensive exam, presentation, final project, recital, portfolio, etc.).

(3) Selecting plan I or plan II

(a) Plan I: masters thesis

The steps involved in completing a thesis generally include: proposal submission; proposal approval; research and analysis of findings; preliminary draft submission to committee; changes, additions, and corrections; final draft submission and committee approval; final examination or thesis defense; and submission of original, error-free copy (MFA creative writing submit abstract only) to the graduate college via OhioLINK.

Students must be aware of the policies related to the thesis submission process established by the graduate college and published on the graduate college web site. Specifically, the following procedures should be followed:

(i) The final, error-free thesis must be electronically submitted via "OhioLINK" by the published deadline.

(ii) A signed thesis/dissertation defense and manuscript form (ETD submission form) on file in the graduate college by the published deadline.

(b) Thesis committee

Each student is responsible for forming a thesis committee at the same time approval of the thesis topic is requested. The committee is composed of the thesis advisor (also called the major professor) and a minimum of one other member from the graduate faculty of the student's program. A faculty member cannot be required to be on a thesis committee. Not all professors are members of the graduate faculty; students should consult their graduate coordinator to determine who is eligible to be on or chair a committee. Any changes in committee membership must be approved by the graduate coordinator and filed with the graduate college.

(c) Approval of thesis topic

A thesis is required under plan i for the degrees of master of arts, master of education, master of fine arts, master of food and nutrition, master of public administration, master of science, and master of science in criminal justice or master of technology management. A thesis may be required for the degree of master of music, depending on the field.

The thesis topic should arise out of the students personal exploration in the field of study. The formal petition for approval of the thesis topic must clearly set forth the problem, the intended organization, and the methods of development of the thesis. After approval by the student's committee and graduate coordinator, the thesis topic must be filed with the students department and the petition of topic approval submitted to the graduate college. A student must have a minimum grade point average of three point zero in all graduate work at the time of application for thesis topic approval. For more details, consult the thesis and dissertation handbook.

Depending upon the field and the type of degree sought, the thesis may represent a specifically limited piece of research, the solving of a complex problem of design, a critical understanding of a sector of knowledge of considerable dimensions, or a thorough critical analysis or completed creative production of a substantial piece of literature or art.

(d) Thesis drafts and abstract

A preliminary draft of the completed thesis (defined as a manuscript that answers the stated problem) should be submitted to the thesis committee by the time a student files the application for graduation.

The final draft of the thesis (defined as the thesis manuscript with content embodying all corrections requested by the committee) should be submitted to the thesis committee sufficiently prior to the date set for the final examination to allow for a rigorous and careful reading of the manuscript by the committee. The graduate coordinator and departmental handbook should be consulted for this deadline. The committees approval of the thesis and the abstract are certified by the graduate college at the time of the final examination.

The original, error-free copy of the approved thesis (MFA-creative writing submit abstract only) must be electronically submitted to the graduate college via "OhioLINK" by the published deadline. Students failing to meet this deadline will not be eligible for graduation that semester. The manuscript must conform to the specifications outlined in the thesis and dissertation handbook.

(e) Final examination

A candidate for a thesis degree has a final written and/or oral examination conducted by the committee by the published deadline. This examination does not in any way release the student from the regular examinations in courses for which the student has registered.

(f) Minimum/continuous registration

A plan I masters degree student must register for a minimum of three credits of thesis research (6990) as a degree requirement. A maximum of six hours of thesis research may be credited toward a masters degree, but a student is expected to register for as many additional hours as are necessary to complete the work. The minimum continuous registration for a thesis student is one hour of 6990 per semester. When it is determined that a student does not have sufficient thesis hours, the graduate college, in conjunction with the students academic department, will process a registration for the student for deficient hours. The student will be billed by the bursar for all fees related to the registration (i.e., instructional, nonresident fee, general fee, registration, and late fee as appropriate).

Students should begin registering for thesis research (6990) at the time when they begin planning their thesis project. Students who register for thesis research are required to maintain continuous registration in thesis research from one semester to another, unless they are graduating in the summer term, regardless of whether they are in residence at the university until the research is completed and the thesis is accepted by the graduate college.

Graduate college policy requires that all graduate students be registered for a minimum of one semester hour during the term in which they graduate (fall, spring, or summer). A student who completes all degree requirements by the end of the first day of the semester in which he or she is graduating is not required to register during the graduation semester.

(g) Plan II: non-thesis option

Plan II masters students are often required to take more courses than plan I students. In many departments and programs, students must take and pass a comprehensive examination or satisfactorily complete a project not later than two weeks before commencement. The examination usually consists of written essays and takes several hours to complete. In some departments and programs, a special project may be required instead of a comprehensive examination. Any student who fails the comprehensive examination may, upon recommendation of the programs graduate coordinator and approval of the dean designate of the graduate college, be granted permission to take a second examination. Upon failing a second examination, the student is dropped from the graduate college.

(4) Interdisciplinary master's degree

The interdisciplinary studies degree option is a response to an increasing interest by students and faculty in an interdisciplinary approach to graduate study and scholarship. It is available to students who have been admitted to a masters degree program, but who have unique educational needs that cannot be met within a single degree program. It is limited to those areas in which sufficient faculty and adequate material resources exist to support the proposed course of study.

Any student who has been admitted to a masters degree program and who is interested in pursuing the interdisciplinary studies degree option may develop a proposal under the direction of a faculty advisory committee representing each program or major area of scholarship identified in the proposed interdisciplinary course of study. The course of study must be one that is not available through an existing program, must be at the level (i.e., masters or specialist) of the program to which the student has been admitted, and must combine at least two different graduate degree areas which offer the graduate degree at the masters or specialist level.

The faculty advisory committee must include a minimum of three members of the graduate faculty. Students submit petitions to the graduate college in accordance with the "petition for interdisciplinary degree option guidelines," which are available in the graduate college. Petitions are reviewed by the graduate dean designate.

The transcript of the masters student pursuing the interdisciplinary degree option will designate the masters degree in the field of interdisciplinary studies, with a specialization noted in two or more areas.

An interdisciplinary program can be developed under either a plan I (thesis supervised by interdepartmental committee) or plan II (non-thesis) basis.

(a) Plan I: The program must include a minimum of twenty-eight hours of course credit, plus a thesis (six hours).

(b) Plan II: The program must include a minimum of thirty-two hours of course credit, plus a comprehensive exam, presentation, final project, recital, portfolio, etc.

(5) Joint or cooperative degrees

"In light of the universitys commitment to preparing students for an increasingly globalized world, departments or programs at BGSU have the option to develop a joint or cooperative degree program with another domestic or international university. According to the RACGS guidelines, "In a joint degree program, two or more universities share the administrative, supervisory, and academic responsibility for the proposed program. Degree authority resides jointly in all participating institutions. Individual institutions do not have independent authority to offer the degree" ["Ohio board of regents advisory committee on graduate study," November 30, 2012].

The purpose of the students program, pursued at two different institutions of higher education, is to develop one or more of the following: competency in two collateral fields of inquiry; the interdisciplinary ability to integrate the knowledge and analytical skills in two disciplines; or the capacity to integrate academic practices that draw on methodologies in use within two different national or cultural frames of reference, including immersion and developed proficiency in a second language.

In a typical two-year joint or cooperative degree program, the student will spend a full academic year at each of the two institutions. To demonstrate the capacity for an effective integration of the multiple or, where applicable, interdisciplinary approaches, the student must complete the basic core requirements for each curriculum with a minimum three point zero GPA. Either the plan I or plan II option is available to the student.

Typically, the joint or cooperative degree program will consist of the same number of credits required by the individual masters program, with fifty per cent plus one of the credits issued by BGSU in accordance with the rule mandated by the Ohio board of regents. Students on the plan I track can expect to take up to six credits devoted to the thesis whereas candidates on the plan II track will take at least three credits devoted to the research project.

Students in the joint or cooperative degree program continue to have the option of transferring an additional nine credits as non-BGSU credits when the partner institution offers the masters candidates the option of taking more than seventeen credits during the academic year. Partnerships with non-English-speaking universities may include additional courses in ESOL for foreign students from the partner institution on a case-by-case basis.

In contrast to the dual masters degree program, it is the departments or programs in the two universities, participating in the joint or cooperative degree programs that will establish the rationale and program of study (with electives) in conjunction with the graduate college.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-17 | Posthumous awarding of a graduate degree-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria for posthumous awarding of a graduate degree.

(B) Policy

Bowling Green state university may confer graduate degrees posthumously upon students who are deceased prior to formal completion of all degree requirements of the programs being pursued. Final approval for awarding degrees posthumously shall rest with the board of trustees, which will act upon the recommendation of the president of Bowling Green state university.

(1) Guidelines for consideration

In general, to be considered for conferring of a graduate degree posthumously at Bowling Green state university, the student should have met the following conditions:

(a) At the time of death, the student was in good academic standing.

(b) At the time of death, the student was enrolled in the final year of the program (or equivalent). Graduate students completing a thesis or dissertation should have an approved proposal and should have commenced their research.

(2) Approval process

The process for identifying and considering candidates for the posthumous awarding of a degree is as follows:

(a) The dean of students, dean of the college, or the dean of the graduate college, upon learning of the death of a Bowling Green state university student, shall notify the relevant academic units.

(b) The school or departmental faculty, school director, or department chair, will determine if the students overall record merits awarding the degree posthumously and will forward that recommendation to the college dean.

(c) The college dean will forward her/his recommendation to the graduate dean. The graduate dean will provide a recommendation to the provost.

(d) The provost will weigh all information relating to each case independently and will prepare a recommendation to the president, who will determine if it should be forwarded for board of trustees consideration.

(3) Procedure upon approval

(a) The family of the deceased will be notified of the approval by the provost (or designate).

(b) The degree will be conferred at the next regularly scheduled commencement.

The posthumous nature of the award will be indicated on the diploma, the student's permanent record, and in the commencement program.

(4) Extraordinary circumstances

Cases that do not meet the above specified guidelines may be considered when extraordinary circumstances prevail. In such cases, the appropriate faculty, department head, school director, deans, and the provost will be consulted prior to a recommendation being prepared for board of trustees consideration.

(5) Additional recognition of deceased students

Date: November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-18 | Student research-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria for student research and research support.

(B) Policy

(1) Student research

Thesis and dissertation research projects involving laboratory animals must be reviewed by the institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) prior to the initiation of the study. Student research projects that involve collecting information from or about living persons must be reviewed by the human subjects review board (HSRB). For projects involving collection of any kind of information from or about people by survey, interview, testing, observation, examination, specimen collection, or review of records, graduate students should consult with a member of the human subjects review board. This consultation should take place during the design stage of the research project. The identity of a departments representative may be obtained from the departmental graduate coordinator or by calling the office of research compliance.

Graduate students collecting data or carrying on correspondence in connection with a thesis or dissertation may not use the name of the university without special written permission of the dean designate of the graduate college. Any questionnaires or other materials distributed outside the university must receive the prior approval of the instructor or advisor in charge of the study before a student seeks approval by the dean designate.

Additional information concerning the policies applicable to student research projects can be obtained from the office of sponsored programs and research (OSPR).

(2) Research support

(a) Professional travel support

Travel funds available through the departments are used to encourage and support graduate student attendance, participation, and paper presentations at scholarly and professional meetings. To be eligible to apply for a travel award, graduate students must (i) be fully admitted (i.e., without conditions) to a BGSU graduate degree program, (ii) be in good academic standing, and (iii) be enrolled at the time of the conference.

(b) Final project/thesis/dissertation support

Support funds available through the departments are intended to assist graduate students in meeting expenses of their research or creative activities. Awards may be made to (i) doctoral candidates engaged in dissertation research, and (ii) masters students involved in final project research or creative work under plan II or thesis research under plan I. In order to be eligible to apply, applicants must

(i) Be in good academic standing,

(ii) Be enrolled at BGSU, and

(iii) Have an approved topic.

Applicants whose research involves collection of any kind of information from or about people by survey, interview, testing, observation, examination, specimen collection, or review of records must obtain prior approval from the human subjects review board. Applicants whose research involves laboratory animals must obtain prior approval from the animal care and use committee.

Applications for professional travel and/or thesis/dissertation support should be made directly to the graduate coordinator of each unit receiving funds. Applicants are encouraged to apply early to prevent delays in their research.

November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-20 | Thesis/dissertation- graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes thesis/dissertation policies and procedures.

(B) Policy

(1) Thesis/dissertation

A thesis is required under plan i for the degrees of master of arts, master of education, master of fine arts, master of food and nutrition, master of public administration, master of science, and master of science in criminal justice or master of technology management. A thesis may be required for the degree of master of music, depending on the field.

The thesis topic should arise out of the students personal exploration in the field of study. The formal petition for approval of the thesis topic must clearly set forth the problem, the intended organization, and the methods of development of the thesis. After approval by the student's committee and graduate coordinator, the thesis topic must be filed with the students department and the petition of topic approval submitted to the graduate college.

A preliminary draft of the completed thesis (defined as a manuscript that answers the stated problem) should be submitted to the thesis committee by the time a student files the application for graduation. The final draft of the thesis (defined as the thesis manuscript with content embodying all corrections requested by the committee) should be submitted to the thesis committee sufficiently prior to the date set for the final examination to allow for a rigorous and careful reading of the manuscript by the committee.

Doctoral students must submit a request for dissertation topic approval to the graduate college on the thesis/dissertation topic approval form. Approval of the topic by the graduate college admits the student to doctoral candidacy. To be eligible for candidacy, the student must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher, have completed any foreign language requirements, where required, and have passed the preliminary examinations.

The results of the final examination (e.g., dissertation defense) for the doctoral degree must be received in the graduate college by the published deadlines each semester. The graduate college expects that the official university copy of the submitted manuscript will be error-free and ready for publication on "OhioLINK." Students who upload manuscripts that are not error-free are in danger of a delayed graduation date.

The graduate council approved the implementation of electronic submission of theses and dissertations beginning with Fall 2005 for all graduate programs. With the exception of theses written in the MFA program in creative writing, paper copies are no longer accepted by the graduate college.

(2) The thesis/dissertation committee

You and your department's graduate coordinator should work together to select an advisor (also called "major professor") and a thesis or dissertation committee. If you are a doctoral student, the graduate college will appoint an additional member to your committee to represent the graduate faculty. This representative, commonly referred to as the graduate faculty representative (GFR), will be from a department other than that of your field of study. The responsibility of the GFR is to provide an external, objective evaluation of the dissertation and to verify that graduate standards have been met. You may elect to have a faculty member from a different academic area on your committee, but s/he is considered an additional "regular" member not the GFR. The minimum size for a thesis committee is two (the advisor and one additional member), and for a dissertation committee, four (the advisor, two additional members, and the GFR).

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-21 | Time limits for degree and revalidation - graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes time limits for degree and revalidation/retake policies for graduate students.

(B) Policy

(1) Time limits

The time limit to complete all degree requirements for masters, certificate, or specialist students is six years from the end of the earliest course used to fulfill degree requirements and eight years for doctoral students.

(2) Course revalidation

If a course has been taken more than six years before graduation (masters, certificate, or specialist), or more than eight years before graduation (doctoral), students should consult their graduate program coordinator. The graduate program coordinator will determine if that course needs to be retaken, or if a revalidation experience can be offered. If offered, a revalidation experience may include a special examination or other written assignment, a portfolio, a new comprehensive or preliminary examination, or another academically appropriate experience. A thesis or dissertation may also serve as a revalidation method if approved. Students may be required to register for academic credit to accompany the academic revalidation experiences.

If the revalidation is successful (e.g., passed by a grade of B or better), then the original course grade will be retained and the students transcript will reflect revalidation. If the revalidation is unsuccessful, then no change will be made to the students record. More than one attempt to revalidate a course is permitted if supported by a recommendation from the graduate coordinator of the degree program and approved by the dean designate of the graduate college.

(3) Limits to revalidation

(a) Revalidation opportunities are offered at the discretion of the program, and may not be offered in all situations.

(b) A successfully revalidated course can be used to fulfill degree requirements for up to two years from the semester in which it was revalidated.

(c) Students may not revalidate courses with a grade of c or lower, courses that are internships or other forms of practicum, or courses taken at other institutions.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015, 10/17/2018
Rule 3341-3-22 | Transcripts- graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes transcripts and ownership of transcripts.

(B) Policy

An official transcript of a students record is used for transferring credits to other colleges and universities and for transmitting information to certifying agencies and employers. An official transcript is issued only at the written request of the student. An official transcript is not released for a student who is delinquent on any financial obligation to the university. Details regarding the transcript request process, including a link to a printable transcript order form can be found at ordering official transcripts.

Transcripts from other institutions that have been presented for admission or evaluation become part of the students permanent academic file and are not returned or copied for distribution. Any students desiring transcripts covering work completed elsewhere should request them from the institutions concerned.

Date: November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-23 | Academic forgiveness for undergraduates-undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

The academic forgiveness policy pertains only to former Bowling Green state university (BGSU) students returning to the university as undergraduate students after a significant absence and prior to earning any degree at any institution. This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

A student who returns to the university after an extended absence and who demonstrates the ability to do well academically, as described below, may use academic forgiveness to remove the effect of earlier unsatisfactory grades. Such students are strongly encouraged to meet with an advisor in their college office to develop an academic plan and to discuss this policy.

(1) To be eligible, a student must

(a) Be readmitted to the university after an absence of at least three calendar years;

(b) Have attempted* at least twenty-four letter-graded hours since readmission;

(c) Have earned at least a two point five GPA in all courses attempted* since readmission;

(d) Request academic forgiveness in writing from the office of registration and records.

(e) This request must be made before the end of the semester immediately following the one in which the requirement set forth in paragraph (B)(1)(b) of this rule was met (with the exception of spring semester, when the request must be made by the end of fall semester).

(2) After the student elects academic forgiveness and after eligibility is verified, the following adjustments are made to the student's academic record:

(a) All grades earned at BGSU prior to reentry are excluded from the calculation of the GPA (i.e., forgiven);

(b) Credit hours earned for courses prior to reentry with the grade of at least "S" or "C" are retained;

(c) Credit hours earned for courses prior to reentry with a grade of "D" are not retained;

(d) Each grade that is subject to this policy will remain on the official transcript but will be noted as "forgiven."

(3) All grades, including those that have been forgiven, are used in calculating eligibility for membership in honor societies and graduation with honors.

(4) A student can have the academic forgiveness policy applied to his or her academic record only one time, and academic forgiveness must be prior to the award of the degree for which the hours and grades involved will be applicable. (For example, a student who is pursuing a baccalaureate degree and has earned an associate degree from BGSU cannot apply the policy to any credit earned prior to the completion of the associate degree.)

(5) Students are not eligible for GPA improvements under the course retake policy after academic forgiveness has been applied.

(6) A student who has been granted academic forgiveness must earn a minimum of thirty credit hours from the point of readmission to be eligible to receive a baccalaureate degree.

(7) Any academic probations, suspensions, or dismissals from forgiven semesters will not be forgiven. They will count when the unsatisfactory academic progress policy is applied to the student's record after readmission.

(8) Any punitive grades awarded as the result of an academic honesty case will not be forgiven. Grades of A, B, C, D, F, or WF will continue to be used to calculate the students cumulative grade point average. Grades of S or U will not have any impact on the student's grade point average.

*Attempted hours include all courses that contribute to the GPA, including those for which the student received credit by earning grades of A, B, C, or D or for which the student did not receive credit due to grades of F, WF, or I.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-24 | Academic honesty.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy explains violations of academic honesty, the rights and responsibilities of students, the adjudication process including appeals, and the penalties to a student found guilty of an academic honesty violation.

(B) Policy

Students are expected to maintain the highest level of integrity in their academic work. From time to time, however, issues such as cheating, fabrication, or plagiarism in an academic exercise arise. The original jurisdiction and penalty both vary depending on the offense and when it is discovered. Also, there are specific requirements for record-keeping and for notification of the student and academic dean. The official policy is included in the faculty handbook (academic charter) http://www.bgsu.edu/content/dam/BGSU/catalog/academic-honesty/official-policy.pdf. The policy is also available in the student handbook (codes of conduct).

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-25 | Academic honors- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy provides the requirements for undergraduate academic honors.

(B) Policy

(1) Dean's list

Full-time undergraduate students who demonstrate a high level of excellence in academic work have their names placed on the academic dean's list. The requirement for achieving the academic dean's list is a grade point average of 3.5 or above in the preceding semester with no fewer than twelve credit hours per semester included in the grade point average computation.

(2) Graduation with honors

The record of each undergraduate candidate for graduation with a very high grade point average is carefully reviewed by the university committee on honors and awards so that appropriate recognition and honor may be accorded each student who has achieved outstanding academic success throughout his or her undergraduate years. The tentative honor, announced at commencement and released to the newspapers, is figured without the grades from the student's last academic semester. The final honor that is put on the permanent record and diploma is based on the student's entire academic record. Note that graduation with honors does not imply that the recipient has participated in the university honors program. For further details about graduation with university honors, contact the university honors program.

In determining academic honors, total letter-graded credits (TLC) are credits for those courses that determine the student's grade point average. The GPA requirement will be higher than the minimum of three point five, three point seven five, or three point nine for those students who have completed fewer than one hundred ten TLC (or fifty-five TLC for associate degree candidates). See formula in this policy.

More than twelve semester hours of "S/U" grades may increase the grade point average needed for graduation with honors. Courses taken under advanced placement, credit by exam, CLEP, etc. are considered "S/U" and do not count as letter-graded hours.

(a) With distinction

With distinction signifies a high level of academic achievement in an associate degree program and graduation with praise. The honor requires a minimum of twenty-eight TLC and a cumulative GPA at least as high as the larger of three point five and [four point five - (TLC/fifty-five)].

(b) With highest distinction

With highest distinction signifies the highest level of academic achievement in an associate degree program and graduation with great praise. This honor requires a minimum of fifty TLC and a cumulative GPA at least as high as the larger of three point nine and [four point nine - (TLC/fifty-five)].

(c) Cum laude

Cum laude signifies a high level of academic achievement in a baccalaureate degree program and graduation with praise. This honor requires a minimum of fifty-five TLC and a cumulative GPA at least as high as the larger of three point five and [four point five - (TLC/one hundred ten)].

(d) Magna cum laude

Magna cum laude signifies a very high level of academic achievement in a baccalaureate degree program and graduation with great praise. This honor requires a minimum of eighty-three TLC and a cumulative GPA at least as high as the larger of three point seven five and [four point seventy five - (TLC/one hundred ten)].

(e) Summa cum laude

Summa cum laude signifies the highest level of academic achievement in a baccalaureate degree program and graduation with great praise. This honor requires a minimum of ninety-nine TLC and a cumulative GPA at least as high as the larger of three point nine and [four point nine - (TLC/one hundred ten)].

(3) Transfer credit

In the case of transfer credit, each record from the transfer institution(s) is studied and evaluated individually. In general, the following principles serve as guides:

(a) A student entering the university with transferred credit must meet the cumulative grade point average standard for honors in all hours completed, transferred and otherwise. In addition, the grade point average of all work taken at Bowling Green state university must be of honors quality;

(b) A student must have completed at least thirty hours in letter-graded courses at BGSU (fifteen hours in letter-graded courses for an associate degree candidate);

(c) A candidate should be in residence at least one academic year (one academic semester for an associate degree candidate) or thirty hours in consecutive summers immediately preceding graduation. A student with written permission to participate in an approved combination curriculum in cooperation with a professional school or college of another institution is exempt from this requirement.

The academic honors policy is to apply for students graduating fall semester 2010 and thereafter.

(4) Graduation with university honors

Graduation with university honors is one of the highest honors awarded by the university. The requirements are:

(a) A minimum three point five GPA overall, as well as a three point four or better in university honors courses;

(b) The completion of at least twenty-three semester hours of university honors courses, including the honors core sequence (HNRS 2010 and 2020) and the two-course honors project sequence (HNRS 4980 and 4990) for bachelor degrees (thirteen hours, honors core sequence, and HNRS 2990 for associate degrees, BGSU Firelands only); and

(c) At least a "B" in each course and no more than ten of the twenty-three hours in any single university general education knowledge domain.

(5) Graduation with presidential honors

Graduation with presidential honors is the highest honor awarded by the university. The requirements are:

(a) A minimum three point seventy-five GPA overall, as well as a three point five or better in university honors courses;

(b) The completion of at least twenty-seven semester hours of university honors courses (including the four-course interdisciplinary sequence HNRS 3010, 3020, 3030, 3040) with at least a "B" in each course; and

(c) The completion of the two-course honors project sequence (HNRS 4980 and 4990).

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-26 | Academic load and undergraduate enrollment status- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

(1) Introduction

The academic load of a full-time undergraduate student will not be fewer than twelve hours at any time. A full-time student normally should be registered for fifteen to sixteen hours per semester. Enrollment for more than eighteen hours requires the approval of the student's college office.

Students who maintain an academic load of fifteen to sixteen hours per semester will make progress toward a timely degree completion and will advance in class standing each year, allowing them such benefits as priority for class registration and student housing. A full-time student who drops enough hours to become a part-time student is eligible to remain in university-owned housing and to retain membership in university organizations; however, the student is subject to the following restrictions:

(a) Ineligibility for intercollegiate athletics;

(b) Possible reduction of financial aid awards.

(2) Enrollment status

A student's enrollment status is determined by the number of class hours the student is enrolled during a semester. A full-time undergraduate student is enrolled for twelve or more semester hours. A part-time undergraduate student is enrolled for fewer than twelve semester hours. Based on institutional policy, there are designated internship and co-operative education classes that are considered to be enrolled in a full-time academic experience at BGSU. Students should consult with their college office when scheduling internships and co-operative education classes if they have any questions. See also "academic load."

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-27 | Admission to BGSU- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

For admission to Bowling Green state university a freshman applicant must:

(1) Be a graduate of a senior high school approved or accredited by the department of education of the state in which it is located; or

(2) Have earned high school equivalency through the general educational development (GED) testing program (issued by the state department of education); or

(3) Present GED test results and ACT or SAT test results, if the student completed secondary education through an alternative program such as home schooling; or

(4) Present an international baccalaureate diploma or certificate.

Applications for admission are accepted and processed each semester of the academic year until the capacity of the freshman class is reached on the Bowling Green campus and at BGSU Firelands in Huron, Ohio. Admission is competitive and is based on the high school curriculum, cumulative grade point average, standardized test scores, and class rank.

High school students are encouraged to apply for admission beginning April fifteenth of their junior year. Because housing accommodations and classroom facilities are limited, students should submit their applications as soon after receiving them as possible. All credentials should be on file by February first of the senior year to assure consideration for admission.

Although the largest number of new students enters in August, it is possible to enter in the spring or summer semester. The application deadline (freshmen and transfer, main campus) for the spring semester is December fifteenth, and for the summer semester May fifteenth. Students applying to the fall have until August first to submit the application. All admission credentials must be received by the office of admissions fourteen days before the semester or fourteen days before the beginning of classes for the summer sessions to allow sufficient time for processing, notification, academic advising, and registration for classes. For international applicants, the application deadline for spring semester is November first, for the summer semester April fifteenth, and for the fall semester the deadline is July fifteenth. For BGSU Firelands, the regional campus of Bowling Green in Huron, Ohio, applications for admission are accepted up to two weeks before the beginning of classes.

An admissions application packet is available online at www.bgsu.edu or by contacting the office of admissions, Bowling Green state university, Bowling Green, OH 43403. To be considered for admission, applicants are required to submit the application for undergraduate admission, a forty-five dollars nonrefundable application fee for the online application (fifty dollars for the paper application), and an official transcript with ACT or SAT test results. All transcripts, test results, and other academic credentials must be mailed from the school or agency to the office of admissions to be accepted as official. Academic credentials mailed by a student will be inadequate for evaluation for an admissions decision. All admission credentials submitted to the office of admissions become the property of Bowling Green state university and cannot be returned. Any misrepresentation of credentials will be cause for refusal or cancellation of admission or expulsion from the university if discovered subsequently.

Applicants who have already graduated from high school may send their completed applications and application fee directly to the BGSU office of admissions. An official final high school transcript should be sent from the high school to the office of admissions.

Applicants who have earned high school equivalency through the general education development (GED) testing program should send their completed applications and application fee directly to the BGSU office of admissions. Both an official copy of the GED results and an official high school transcript of all work completed must be sent to the office of admissions.

A student who has not taken coursework anywhere (high school or college) during the past five years prior to enrollment is eligible for admission to the university. Under this five-year admission policy, a student receives admission and is required to take courses under the close supervision of his or her college academic advisor.

Applicants may fulfill the requirements for admission by presenting an international baccalaureate (IB) diploma or certificate. Grades of four through seven in higher-level subjects may be considered for individual course credit. Students with questions about the IB should contact the office of admissions.

The ACT or the SAT is required of all freshmen except those who have been out of high school for three or more years. Either test will fulfill this requirement. International applicants are not required to submit ACT or SAT results.

All non-native speakers of English are required to take the TOEFL test, or if unavailable, the Michigan test. This is required of international students issued immigrant visas, those transferring from another American college or university, those (with English as a foreign language) coming from U.S. territories (such as Puerto Rico), and those granted U.S. citizenship within recent years.

As a condition of admission to the university and reflecting the educational philosophy of the institution, all freshman- and sophomore-level students are required to live in university residence halls. This policy does not apply to students over the age of twenty-three or to students commuting daily from the home of a parent, legal guardian, or spouse (commuters must live within fifty miles of Bowling Green), or to students who have attained sixty academic semester hours or four semesters of campus residency on or before their first day of classes. See the office of residence life for more details.

For residency requirements for Ohio residents and nonresidents, refer to residency regulations under office of registration and records.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-28 | Admission to BGSU Firelands- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

For admission to BGSU Firelands a freshman applicant must:

(1) Be a graduate of a senior high school approved or accredited by the department of education of the state in which it is located; or

(2) If the student completed secondary education through an alternative program such as home schooling, present ACT or SAT test results showing at least a 21 ACT or 1000 SAT; or

(3) Have earned high school equivalency through the general educational development (GED) testing program (issued by the state department of education); or

(4) Present an international baccalaureate diploma or certificate.

Although the largest number of new students enters in August, it is possible to enter in the spring semester or the summer semester. All admission credentials should be received by the office of admissions two weeks before the beginning of classes to allow sufficient time for processing, notification, academic advising, and registration for classes. High school students are encouraged to apply for admission beginning April fifteenth of their junior year.

Application materials for BGSU Firelands are available online at www.firelands.bgsu.edu or by contacting the office of admissions, BGSU Firelands, Huron, OH 44839. To be considered for admission, applicants are required to submit the application for undergraduate admission, a forty dollars non refundable application fee, and official transcripts. All transcripts, test results, and other academic credentials must be mailed from the school or agency to the office of admissions to be accepted as official. Personal copies of official transcripts will be evaluated for acceptability. If deemed unacceptable, students must provide official copies sent directly from the school.

All admission credentials submitted to the office of admissions become the property of Bowling Green state university and cannot be returned. Any misrepresentation of credentials will be cause for refusal or cancellation of admission or expulsion from the university if discovered subsequently.

Applicants who have already graduated from high school may send their completed application and application fee directly to the office of admissions. An official final high school transcript should be sent from the high school to the office of admissions.

Applicants who have earned high school equivalency through the general education development (GED) testing program should send their completed applications and application fee directly to the office of admissions. Both an official copy of the GED results and an official high school transcript of all work completed must be sent to the office of admissions.

Applicants may fulfill the requirements for admission by presenting an International baccalaureate (IB) diploma or certificate. Grades of four through seven in higher-level subjects may be considered for individual course credit. Students with questions about the IB should contact the office of admissions.

All applicants who have been charged with, pled guilty to or convicted of one or more felonies are required to submit copies of police reports, including narratives and the final judgment entries for each offense to the office of admissions. These documents are reviewed, and if an offense is of a violent nature, that information is forwarded and reviewed by a committee of the BG campus to determine if the applicant is eligible to take classes on the BGSU Firelands campus.

All non-native speakers of English are required to take the TOEFL test, or if unavailable, the Michigan test. This is required of international students issued immigrant visas, those transferring from another American college or university, those (with English as a foreign language) coming from U.S. territories (such as Puerto Rico), and those granted U.S. citizenship within recent years.

For residency requirements for Ohio residents and nonresidents, refer to residency regulations under office of registration and records.

A student who is applying to BGSU Firelands and does not meet the above requirements and who has not attended another college or university for one or more years will be admissible under our forgiveness policy.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-29 | Advanced placement and college credit plus- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

(1) College credit plus program

BGSU is aligned with Ohios college credit plus program. This program provides opportunities for high school students to earn college and high school credits at the same time (dual credit) by taking college courses from community colleges or universities.

(2) Advanced placement

The advanced placement program (AP) enables entering students to earn university credit for college-level courses taken in high school based upon the scores achieved in final examinations. Advanced placement courses and exams are offered through high schools. The score reports are then sent to BGSU for credit review. Current credit guidelines are available from the office of registration and records, transfer evaluation services. More specific information about advanced placement can be found in the undergraduate catalog.

Date: November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-30 | Advanced standing- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Advanced standing may be achieved in six ways:

(1) Demonstrating appropriate achievement on BGSU placement tests, which leads to exemption from courses but not credit.

(2) Passing an examination administered by an academic department of the university (see credit by examination).

(3) Completing a college-level course in high school and earning a prescribed grade in an advanced placement examination administered in the high school through the college entrance examination board (CEEB). This leads to college course credit and/or exemption. (For more information, see advanced placement.)

(4) Attaining appropriate scores on specific CLEP subject examinations. This leads to credit as approved by appropriate academic departments. (Not all academic departments accept credit for completion of CLEP Examinations.) For more information on CLEP subject examinations, contact transfer evaluation services in the office of registration and records. For information on scheduling a CLEP subject examination, contact the counseling center (see CLEP).

(5) Passing a higher-level course in sequence with a grade of "C" or above and thereby earning credit for lower-level sequence courses in prescribed departments.

(6) Admitted students with considerable work/life experience matching specific course content may be eligible for credit through writing a portfolio about what they have learned. Students will be required to complete an interview with the director of adult learner services and a preparatory English course to participate in portfolio assessment.

Date: November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-31 | Associate degree programs- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

BGSU Firelands offers courses leading to fourteen associate degrees, representing twenty-three areas of study. The associate of arts and associate of science programs are designed to fulfill the first two years of study for baccalaureate degrees. Completion of either degree, along with completion of BGSU's transfer module, will facilitate articulation with baccalaureate programs at any public university in the state of Ohio. The A.A. and A.S. programs may also serve as terminal programs for students who do not plan to complete a four-year degree. The associate of applied business, associate of applied science, and associate of technical study degrees are intended to prepare students for employment upon graduation. Although termed career education, they are also articulated with similarly oriented four-year programs, thus permitting students to continue toward baccalaureate degrees in related disciplines.

(1) General requirements for associate degrees:

A candidate for an associate degree must complete the requirements listed below and any additional requirements set by the college offering this degree.

(a) Satisfy all university entrance requirements.

(b) Earn a minimum of sixty-two semester hours (some degrees require more than sixty-two hours of credit). At least fifteen credit hours must be BGSU courses. There are no exceptions to either the "sixty-two total hour" rule or to the "fifteen hours BGSU courses" rule. In addition, to ensure that the program of study is complete, coherent, and satisfies BGSU standards, specific courses that are integral to the degree, as identified in the check sheet for the major, must be taken at BGSU (e.g., capstone courses or similar culminating experience).

(c) Earn a cumulative grade point average of at least two point zero ("C" average) for all coursework attempted.

(d) Complete the first-year English composition sequence, preferably in the first year.

(e) Complete all course requirements for a degree program as described in the BGSU Firelands section.

(f) Submit an application for graduation through the MyBGSU web portal.

(i) For graduation in December, an application must be filed by the end of the second week of the fall semester.

(ii) For May graduation, the deadline for filing an application is the end of the second week of the spring semester.

(iii) For graduation in August, the filing date deadline is the end of the first week of the summer semester.

A student who does not fulfill all requirements toward a degree within four weeks after commencement must reapply for graduation at the next commencement.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-32 | Audit- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy explains how students are able to register for courses without receiving credit and the fees that will be incurred for participating in a class as an audit.

(B) Policy

A student who wishes to attend a class without receiving credit for it may register to audit that course. A per-hour instruction fee is charged as if the student had registered for the course for credit. Students may add classes for audit status within seven calendar days from the beginning of classes during fall and spring regular sessions or the first three calendar days of any other session. A student may also change to or from audit status during the first fourteen calendar days of the fall or spring regular sessions or the first five calendar days of any summer session.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-33 | Baccalaureate degree programs- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

A baccalaureate degree program enables students to achieve the intellectual, ethical, and cultural maturity that will allow them to become responsible participants in our society. Each student's path toward this goal is unique, reflecting both the student's interests and talents and the range of opportunities for study. Students make choices among selected sets of courses while satisfying the requirements of a particular degree program, and they are encouraged to take other courses (free electives) to explore individual academic interests.

Students progress toward a baccalaureate degree by completing courses that satisfy a combination of university, college, and major/specialization requirements. Some courses may satisfy more than one requirement, so students should work closely with their advisors to determine which allowable combination will meet their own needs. Other courses may meet a student's particular educational needs yet may not be used to meet degree requirements. These include all developmental courses (below the 1000 level), some courses retaken for credit (see retaking a course) and any courses identified specifically as non-applicable to a degree. Each student is ultimately responsible for knowing which requirements apply.

(1) University requirements

Students in all baccalaureate degree programs must:

(a) Earn a minimum of one hundred twenty-two semester hours of credit. At least thirty credit hours must be BGSU courses. There are no exceptions to either the "one hundred twenty-two total hour" rule or to the "thirty hours BGSU courses" rule. In addition, to ensure that the program of study is complete, coherent, and satisfies BGSU standards, specific courses that are integral to the degree, as identified in the check sheet for the major, must be taken at BGSU (e.g., capstone courses or similar culminating experience).

(b) (b) Earn an accumulative grade point average of at least two point zero ("C" average) for all coursework attempted.

(c) Complete the BG perspective requirements, including completion of the first-year English composition sequence, preferably in the first year. A penalty applies if the sequence is delayed past the second year; see writing proficiency.

(d) Complete at least forty hours of credit in courses numbered 3000 and above.

(e) Satisfy all requirements for a degree listed in one of the college sections of this catalog (see "College requirements" in this policy).

(f) File an application for graduation. Forms, available in college offices, should be completed and submitted to the student's college dean.

(i) For graduation in December, an application must be filed by the end of the second week of the fall semester.

(ii) For graduation in May, the deadline for filing an application is the end of the second week of the spring semester.

(iii) For graduation in August, the filing deadline is the end of the first week of the summer semester .

A student who does not fulfill all requirements toward a degree within four weeks after commencement must reapply for graduation at the next commencement.

(2) College requirements

The requirements for specific baccalaureate degrees are described in the appropriate college sections of this catalog. These may include any of the following:

(a) Additional study in particular knowledge domains expected of all students in the college but not included in the BG perspective program (for example, courses in mathematics, communications, or language study).

(b) Completion of a major or specialization and, in some cases, a minor (see major/specialization requirements in this policy).

(c) Proficiency in specialized skill areas (for example, aural skills and keyboard proficiency for the bachelor of music degree).

(d) Completion of an internship or cooperative education experience.

(e) Completion of coursework beyond the one hundred twenty-two credit minimum required by the university.

(f) Attainment of a specified minimum grade in one or more core courses (for example, candidates for the B.S. in education must earn a "C" or better in COMM 1020).

In addition, colleges may specify requirements that degree candidates must meet in order to remain in degree programs. For example, colleges may require a proficiency test, audition, interview, portfolio review, completion of a specific course, or attainment of a specified grade point average before admission to upper-level courses.

(3) Major/specialization requirements

Most (but not all) degrees include requirements for an academic major or specialization. The major provides the student with in-depth practical and theoretical knowledge in one particular area of study. Many majors or specializations offer students alternative paths of study, and students are encouraged to pursue personal interests by taking elective courses related to the major. Study in a major or specialization may focus on courses taught in a single department or program, but may also include related courses in other parts of the university. Some degree programs also require the student to complete a minor, a prescribed set of courses similar to a major but more limited in scope. Students may also voluntarily complete a minor offered by another academic unit.

(4) Minor

A "minor" represents a student's commitment to a body of knowledge separate from the student's principal area of study ("principal area of study" refers to a major, specialization, orin those cases where a named degree is the sole transcript designationa named degree). In recognition of this distinction, a minor will include a minimum of fifteen hours that cannot be applied toward the student's principal area of study or another minor.

Any particular minor may or may not be available to a student, depending on the student's principal area of study. In those cases where the courses in the principal area of study overlap broadly with the courses in the minor, such that there are not fifteen hours in the minor different from the courses in the principal area of study, that minor cannot be taken in the context of that principal area of study (e.g., students may not major and minor in the same discipline). Substitutions to course requirements for a minor are the jurisdiction of the program offering the minor.

By contrast, a "specialization" is a requirement for a set of courses representing a sub-discipline within a major or named degree. "Degree," "major," "specialization," and "minor" are all official transcript designations. Other designations, such as concentration, emphasis, option, cognate, or track, do not appear on students' transcripts; they represent unofficial groupings of courses within a principal area of study.

(5) Dual degree programs

A candidate for a baccalaureate degree who desires to take a second degree from a different college within the university may:

(a) Take work in the second college after graduating from the university or

(b) Qualify for the dual degree program by meeting the requirements listed below.

A student desiring a dual degree must:

(i) Secure permission of the deans of both colleges before the end of the junior year,

(ii) Complete the requirements of both colleges for the degrees sought, and

(iii) Complete at least twenty hours of credit beyond the hours required for a single degree.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-34 | BG perspective (general education curriculum) - undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

The BG perspective curriculum provides a liberal studies foundation, preparing BGSU students for self-reliant learning throughout life and effective participation in a democratic society. BG perspective classes, taken by all students at BGSU, reflect a deep conviction by the BGSU learning community and leaders in all professions that successful, satisfying lives require a wide range of skills and knowledge.

The BG perspective requirements, learning outcomes and approved courses are updated periodically and changes are approved by the BG perspective committee and the undergraduate council. Current specific requirements and course listings can be found in the undergraduate catalog http://www.bgsu.edu/bg-perspective.html.

The BG perspective requirements and learning outcomes are aligned with the university system of Ohios articulation and transfer policy. The Ohio transfer module ensures that students can transfer applicable credits among Ohios public colleges and universities. More specific information about the evaluation of transfer courses for BG perspective credit can be found in the undergraduate catalog under transfer module for institutional credit transfer http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies/transfer-module-for-institutional- credit-transfer.html and BG perspective (general education) credit for transfer students http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies/bg-perspective-credit-for-transfer -students.html.

Student appeals of BG perspective credit for courses follows a formal appeals process http://www.bgsu.edu/bg-perspective/student-appeals.html.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-35 | Changing undergraduates colleges, majors, or degree programs within BGSU- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Sometimes a change of major or degree program may also involve a change of college. Students may have entered BGSU as undecided, have not been able to complete their current major or degree as planned, or have different career goals than when they first entered BGSU. In addition to consulting with their advisors, students are strongly encouraged to contact the career center (419-372-2356) for assistance in career planning and to identify careers that align with their interests, values, and skills.

A student who wishes to change a major or degree program within a college should notify the college office. At that time, an appropriate advisor will be assigned.

A student who wishes to change from a major in one college to a major in another college should consult a college advisor in the intended college about eligibility and requirements for the intended college and degree program (see associate degree programs or baccalaureate degree programs). Academic advisors are available in the intended college office to (1) help students select the degree program that best meets individual needs and interests, and (2) review the requirements of the intended major or degree program to assure that a students plan of study will meet the entry and program requirements.

Following the students consultation with a college advisor, a determination is made by the intended college office to approve or not to approve the transfer. The intended college deans (or designees) signature on the college transfer form is the record of approval to transfer. If transfer to the intended college is not approved, a college transfer form will not be issued or signed. In either case, the student will be notified of the colleges decision. A copy of the signed form indicating approval to transfer is given to the student and a copy is sent to the students current college. Once a students current college receives a signed college transfer form, that college will transmit the students file to the new college.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-36 | Classification of undergraduate students- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Classification of a student as a freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior is determined on the basis of credit hours earned. In an undergraduate degree program a student is classified according to hours earned as follows: freshman, zero to twenty-nine hours; sophomore, thirty to fifty-nine hours; junior, sixty to eighty-nine hours; senior, ninety or more hours.

A student who is enrolled for undergraduate coursework but who does not have a degree goal is a guest undergraduate. A student who has earned a degree and who registers for undergraduate courses without pursuing another degree enrolls as a guest degree-holder.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-37 | Concurrent enrollment- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Concurrent enrollment at Bowling Green state university and the university of Toledo allows a student with at least a two point zero GPA to take courses at both universities and receive credit toward a degree. To be enrolled concurrently during a single semester, a student must be registered for at least one course at both institutions. If a Bowling Green student takes all courses at Toledo during a single semester, then that student must register at the university of Toledo as a transient or guest student. See BGSU students enrolled as guests at another institution. University of Toledo students are admitted to BGSU as guest students to participate in this program.

Under this policy, the university that has most recently granted formal admission to the student is designated as the home university. The other university is the host institution.

A student registering for at least one course at both universities and for eight hours or more of coursework at the home university shall pay all fees to the home university. If a student registers for fewer than eight hours at the home university, instructional, general, and nonresident fees are to be paid at the separate universities. Special course fees are payable to the teaching institution.

All coursework taken under concurrent registration will be registered at each university. It will be included in the calculation of a student's grade point average at the home university. Students must obtain the approval of the proposed course work from the office of the dean of their college before enrolling in concurrent courses at the university of Toledo.

Coursework completed at the university of Toledo may not be used to delete an "F" or other low grades previously earned at Bowling Green state university in grade point average computation.

Concurrent enrollment forms are available through the office of registration and records at either institution (see BGSU office of registration and records).

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-38 | Undergraduate credit by examination- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

An undergraduate student currently registered for at least two semester hours may gain credit by examination with the approval of the student's dean and the department involved. The minimum registration level must be maintained for the entire semester. The student wishing credit in a course must not have enrolled in the course previously and must present sufficient evidence of prior study or experience. The course cannot be a prerequisite for any course the student has completed. Once approved, the examination must be completed within four weeks of the approval. This option may not be repeated. An eighty dollar fee is assessed for a credit-by-exam course. Credits by examination are graded on an "S/U" basis. Further information on procedures is available at the student's college office.

Credit may be earned by attainment of appropriate score levels on selected subject examinations of the college level examination program (CLEP). A student may also receive credit for coursework taken at another institution, in which the final grades were equivalent to "C" or better but which did not transfer because of BGSU policies, by taking a validation examination.

A student in the school of nursing may validate previous nursing knowledge through transfer credit, testing, certification, or portfolio.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-39 | Disbursement of student financial aid- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This is a policy about financial aid disbursement. Student financial aid http://www.bgsu.edu/admissions/scholarships-and-financial-aid.html

(B) Policy

With the exception of federal work study, some departmental scholarships and all outside scholarships, financial aid processed by student financial aid (SFA) will automatically be disbursed to students bursar accounts, provided that their application is complete and they have met the requirements for each aid type. Title IV funds can be disbursed up to ten days prior to the first day of classes for a term. The student is awarded aid for the entire academic year; however, the aid is disbursed proportionately each term.

Prior to the beginning of the term, any confirmed financial aid for that term will be listed as anticipated aid (estimated payment) against a students university charges. The student will then be asked either to pay the balance of the charges or make payment arrangements. Information about BGSUs installment payment plan and other payment arrangements will be included with the bursar statement.

If a student is offered student loans, both a master promissory note and entrance counseling must be completed online at studentLoans.gov. Private scholarship checks received by the university will be directly applied to the students bursar account (unless otherwise specified by the scholarship donor). Once SFA is notified of a private scholarship, it will be listed as part of the students aid package.

When the semester begins, anticipated aid will be changed to disbursed aid on the bursar account, provided the student is registered for the appropriate number of credit hours and has met individual program requirements. Federal financial aid will first be used to pay university housing and meals, instructional, general, and non-resident fees, and special course fees. Some forms of aid, especially federal student aid, are restricted as to what portion of the bill they can pay. Allowable charges for federal aid include, for example, the instructional and general fees. Other miscellaneous charges, such as the legal fee or parking fee may not be covered. We encourage students to review their bills regularly, and contact the office of the bursar with any questions.

If the students aid exceeds the direct costs billed by the university, the difference is refunded to the student to assist with other educational expenses such as books, supplies, transportation, etc. The office of the bursar issues the refund within fourteen days unless there is a signed agreement on file to hold excess aid for a future session billing.

Additional information can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/admissions/scholarships-and-financial-aid.html

Date: February 2nd, 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-40 | Dropping, adding, and changing the grading option- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

During the fall and spring regular sessions, a student may enroll in a course within seven calendar days from the beginning of classes; fourteen calendar days are allowed for a student to change the grading option without college approval or to drop a course with no record on the transcript. During other sessions, students may enroll in courses during the first three calendar days of a given session; five calendar days are allowed for a student to change the grading option or drop a course with no record on the transcript.

After the above deadlines, a student may choose to change the grade option for a course with the approval of the college in which they are enrolled. The student is responsible for filing a schedule change form in the college office on or before the last day of the twelfth week of fall and spring regular sessions. For all other sessions, the student is responsible for filing a schedule change form in the college office before the eighty per cent completion date.

After these dates exceptions may be granted only by the dean of the student's college. For information about withdrawing from a course after the drop date, see grading policies. Students should also consult the grading policies for a discussion of the S/U grading option.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-41 | FERPA rights.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy explains the students rights regarding their academic records in accordance with FERPA.

(B) Policy

The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They include:

(1) The right to inspect and review the student's education records within forty-five days of the day the university receives a request for access.

(2) The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading.

(3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. dept. of education concerning alleged failures by Bowling Green state university to comply with the requirements of FERPA.

Students are notified of their FERPA rights annually by publication in the student affairs handbook.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-42 | Financial aid packaging- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This is a policy about financial aid packaging. Student financial aid http://www.bgsu.edu/admissions/scholarships-and-financial-aid.html

(B) Policy

If you are eligible and aid funds are available, you will receive a "package" composed of funds from different sources. These funds are combined with your resources in an attempt to meet your financial need. The types and amounts of financial aid in your package are limited by regulatory maximums, your academic class status (freshman, sophomore, etc.), grade point average, fund availability, your enrollment status (full- or part-time), and your level of need. Keep in mind that your financial aid package may change as a result of new application data, the verification process, changes in your enrollment status, or office error.

Following the receipt of your FAFSA results, a financial aid "package" will be offered to you. The financial aid package will contain one or a combination of grants, scholarships, loans, and/or work study. Grants and scholarships are sources of student financial aid which are available for education expenses with no requirement to repay. Student loans are the most common source of student financial aid and must be repaid. Students receiving a loan are required to sign a promissory note which details the conditions of the loan. Finally, you may receive work study eligibility which requires you secure a job before receiving funds.

Criteria for selecting recipients for financial aid awards vary. Federal loans, federal Pell grant, federal TEACH grant, and state grants are awarded to students who meet eligibility requirements specific to each of those programs. Additional information about applying for and receiving federal student aid may be found on the department of educations website: https://studentaid.ed.gov.

FSEOG, federal Perkins loan and federal work study are subject to funding limitations. Because finding for these programs is limited, BGSU uses a priority FAFSA filing date of February fifteenth to encourage undergraduate students to apply early and ensure they can be considered for these award program. Awards are made through an automated selection process. Award amounts will depend on annual funding limitations.

Scholarships from BGSU always have award-specific criteria and also limited funds. Most BGSU scholarship criteria can be found by using the searchable scholarship guide or by contacting the department or agency awarding the scholarship. Most scholarships are awarded through a selection process where applications are evaluated by a scholarship selection committee.

Date: February 2nd, 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-43 | First day attendance policy- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Some classes are designated as "first day attendance"; others are not. The following policy applies only to classes designated as "first day attendance."

(1) For students

As a matter of policy, all students who register for a class with a first day attendance designation agree to participate in and abide by the following:

(a) Students should attend the first day of class, or consult with the instructor before the first class meeting regarding any potentially excusable circumstance that will make it impossible for the student to attend the first class meeting. Students accept that if they do not attend and do not contact the instructor before the first class meeting they will be dropped from the class.

(b) If students wish to drop the class, they should do so before the first day of class. This policy should not be used as a mechanism for students to drop classes.

(c) Students are responsible for the accuracy of their class schedule.

(d) Students whose registration falls below full-time status because of being dropped will be eligible for only a partial refund of fees if applicable.

(e) Students high on a wait list are encouraged to attend on the first day (although they may be turned away if there is physically not room for them), in the event registered students do not attend, so that they will not miss material/activities on the first day of class. However, the department holds the responsibility for adding students to the class. Priority is given to students on a wait list to get into that class.

(2) For instructors:

As a matter of policy, all instructors who have a first day attendance designation to their class agree to participate in and abide by the following:

(a) Instructors should take attendance using the most accurate roster possible.

(b) Instructors should report to the department, within one business day of the first class meeting, all students not attending the class regardless of class enrollment level. An exception can be made if the student has an excusable circumstance and has contacted the instructor prior to the first class meeting.

(3) For departments:

As a matter of policy, all departments that assign a first day attendance designation to a class agree to participate in and abide by the following:

(a) Departments are responsible for dropping students who do not attend on the first day of class. (Alternatively, they may forward attendance lists to the office of registration and records for action by the registrar.) This must be done within two business days of the first class meeting. Each department shall determine its own uniform procedure for processing drops in a timely fashion.

(b) Departments are responsible for emailing all dropped students informing them of this action.

(c) Departments who designate a class as a "first day attendance policy" class but who repeatedly do not abide by this policy will not be allowed by the college office to use the designation in the future.

(d) Departments are responsible for filling seats made vacant because of first-day drops. Priority is given to students on a wait list to get into that class.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-44 | Foreign language undergraduate admission requirement- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Admission to Bowling Green state university includes a requirement for a language other than English. This requirement applies only to students seeking a baccalaureate degree. The requirement is typically satisfied through completion of two units of the same language other than English in high school.

(1) If this requirement is not fulfilled at the time of admission to the university, it may be satisfied in one of three ways:

(a) Students who have not completed study of a language other than English in high school, may successfully complete two semesters of the same language (other than English) at the university level.

(b) Students who have acquired a language other than English through life experience or who have learned it through prior study may take credit by examination.

(c) International students whose native language is not English may be exempted by proficiency or by successful completion of ESOL 1000, ESOL 1010, ESOL 1030, and ESOL 1040. A students score on the English proficiency test determines the required courses in this sequence. For more information, see the international students admission policy, which is available here.

(2) The following conditions and stipulations also apply:

(a) Students who have a documented (through disabilities services) learning disability in acquisition of a new language may substitute courses taught in English, from BGSUs existing list of acceptable substitute courses.

(b) American sign language will fulfill this admission requirement.

(c) Computer programming languages will not fulfill this admission requirement.

(d) The foreign language admission requirement will apply to transfer students who have completed fewer than thirty semester hours of credit-bearing post-secondary courses, but will not apply to those students who have completed thirty or more semester hours of credit-bearing post-secondary courses at BGSU Firelands or at another college or university (as per the transfer students policy).

The foreign language admission requirement is to apply for students admitted for fall semester 2007 and thereafter.

Date: November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-45 | General library use policy - undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy provides general guidelines and rules for use of the university libraries.

(B) Policy

(1) University libraries staff are committed to providing:

(a) A welcoming environment that is safe for both individuals and the collections.

(b) Space that is conducive to academic research activities, including both quiet and group study.

(c) Tools for users to freely access information.

(d) Access to the library collections and collections from other institutions.

(e) Courteous and respectful service.

(2) The following policies support these commitments, and failure to observe the policies may result in being asked to leave the library or being referred to campus security.

(a) Computer workstations are primarily for the use of BGSU faculty, staff, and students. Visitors can login as guests during non-busy times when many computers are available or can access the wireless network for their own device from the BGSU ITS homepage.

(b) Children must be supervised by their parent or guardian while in the library.

(c) Bikes are not allowed inside the doors of the library. They may be attached to any of the racks located outside the library, but may not be attached to the ramp which is to be fully accessible to the handicapped at all times.

(d) In case of emergency, elevators will be inoperable, and patrons must use stairways.

(e) Excessive noise or commotion that impacts others ability to conduct their work is prohibited.

(f) Skating is not allowed in the library, in the stairwells, or on the deck. This includes, but is not limited to, skateboards, rollerblades, and in-line skates.

(g) Shoes or appropriate foot coverings must be worn in the library.

(h) At closing, all patrons are required to leave the building.

(i) Food and beverages are allowed except where otherwise indicated.

(j) Mutilation of materials, vandalism, and unauthorized removal of library materials are prohibited by state law (section 2909.05 of the Revised Code) and are violations of the student code. A minimum charge of ten dollars will be assessed for damaging library materials.

(k) Use of tobacco products in any form is not permitted in the libraries.

(l) Service animals and dogs assisting physically challenged patrons are welcome. Pets are not allowed inside the libraries.

(m) Paging of library patrons is done by the circulation desk staff only in emergency situations.

(n) Photography and videotaping in the libraries are allowed only by permission. Requests must be made through the dean of university libraries.

(o) Signs, flyers, and other publications promoting events, clubs, etc., are permitted only on the designated bulletin boards on seventh and eighth floors.

(p) Harassment or intimidation of library users or staff will not be tolerated and will be reported to campus police.

(q) Viewing of controversial and sensitive material

University libraries resist censorship of information and strongly support the principle of intellectual freedom, and thus support an individuals right to view controversial and sensitive material in the library. However, viewing sexually explicit or violent images or videos at a public computer workstation can be offensive and even threatening to other library users and employees. If UL staff members receive complaints about material that a reasonable person would consider objectionable, the library user viewing the material will be asked to stop or move to a less public location.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-46 | Grading policies- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

(1) Grading system

Courses are graded as follows:

(a) Aexcellent

(b) Bgood

(c) Cacceptable

(d) Dpoor but passing

(e) Ffailure

(f) Wwithdrawn

(g) WFwithdrawn failing

(h) INCincomplete

(i) Iincomplete calculated as F

(j) IPin progress

(k) Ssatisfactory

(l) Uunsatisfactory

(m) NCno credit

(n) NGRno grade report by instructor

A student who wishes to attend a class without receiving credit for it may register to audit that course (see audit).

(2) S/U grading

Certain courses (including student teaching, some internships and remedial courses) are graded "S/U" only and are so indicated in the course descriptions. "S" means satisfactory and indicates course credit was earned. "U" means unsatisfactory and indicates no credit. Courses taken under credit by exam and portfolio assessment are considered "S/U" and do not count as letter-graded hours.

A student may also elect an "S/U" grading option in no more than sixteen credit hours in a baccalaureate degree program (beyond those hours graded "S/U" only, as described in the previous paragraph). Any "S/U" hours beyond this limit will not count toward graduation. Many departments do not accept courses taken under the "S/U" option for credit in major or minor requirements; students should consult an advisor. For more information on deadlines to change the grading option, see dropping, adding and changing the grade option.

Students should carefully consider the following before choosing the S/U grade option:

(a) Within the S/U option, work at the level of "C" or better is needed to pass (that is, earn an "S"); within the letter grade option, by contrast, a "D" is a passing grade;

(b) All work is evaluated by a common standard, regardless of grading option;

(c) A grade of "F" may be assigned within the S/U option (for instance, if the student stops attending);

(d) If a student receives an "S" in an elective course, but then changes majors, the new major may require the course be taken for a grade. In those cases, the student may appeal retroactively for a change in grade option (and therefore receive a letter grade).

(e) More than twelve semester hours of "S/U" grades may increase the grade point average needed for graduation with honors. See graduation with honors.

Because of these and other considerations, students should consult an advisor before choosing the S/U grading option.

(3) "No credit" grading

In the event that the grade option is "A/B/C/NC" or "S/NC," all grades will appear on the student's record, though a grade of "no credit" will not affect the accumulative grade point average. A student may receive a grade of "F" in courses with the "no credit" grading option.

(4) Impact of course drops and withdrawals on grading. A grade of "W" is given if a student formally withdraws from a course after the drop deadline (see drop/add policy) but before the end of the twelfth week of a course in a fifteen-week session. The student is responsible for filing a course withdrawal request that also notifies the instructor (withdrawal form) on or before the last day of the twelfth week. For all other sessions, a "W" is assigned if a student withdraws after completing at least thirteen per cent but not more than eighty per cent of the contact hours of the session. The student is responsible for filing a course withdrawal request that also notifies the instructor before the eighty per cent completion date.

(5) A grade of "F" (failing) is assigned under the following circumstances:

(a) The student withdraws after the intervals described in this policy;

(b) The student stops attending the class without processing a withdrawal;

(c) The student has never attended the class and has not processed an official withdrawal.

These provisions apply to the A-F, the S/U and the "No Credit" grading systems. Students taking courses that are graded S/U or No Credit should be aware that it is possible to earn a grade of "F" if they do not follow the guidelines for withdrawing from a course.

See Incomplete marks, in this policy.

(6) Grade point average

For calculating the student's grade point average, the following quality points are assigned to each letter grade:

(a) For each hour of A, four points

(b) For each hour of B, three points

(c) For each hour of C, two points

(d) For each hour of D, one point

(e) For each hour of F or WF, zero points

(f) For each hour of I, zero points

The grade of "WF" is used with zero quality points in computing the grade point average; "W' is not used in computing the grade point average.

For courses graded S/U, grades falling within the range of "A" to "C" are interpreted as "S" and earn course credit. Grades in the range of "D" to "F" are interpreted as "U" and do not earn course credit. In any case, "S" and "U" grades do not affect the accumulative grade point average.

For courses graded "A/B/C/NC," grades of "A," "B," or "C" are calculated according to assigned quality points. A grade of "NC" does not earn course credit and does not affect the accumulative grade point average.

A student's grade point average is obtained by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of hours taken, excluding courses in which the marks "S,""U,""IP,""INC," "NC," or "W" are recorded. The hours for which a mark of "INC" is recorded are excluded from grade point average computation until the deadline for removal.

As an example, suppose a student receives the following grades for a semester:

(i) Biology (a four-hour course) B

(ii) English (a three-hour course) B

(iii) French (a four-hour course) C

(iv) Health (a three-hour course) A

First, determine the number of quality points earned for each course. For example, each hour of B is worth three points and a four-hour B is worth twelve points (three times four).

Therefore, the above grades translate into quality points as follows:

4 times 3 (B) = 12

3 times 3 (B) = 9

4 times 2 (C) = 8

+3 times 4 (A) = 12

__________________

14 hours-- quality points

Now, divide the number of quality points by the number of hours taken for a letter grade. The grade point average for this sample schedule is (forty-one/fourteen=two point nine two). Grade point averages are not rounded up to the nearest hundredth of a point.

(g) Incomplete marks

The mark of "INC" (incomplete) is given when, for some acceptable reason, a student fails to meet a definite requirement in a course as established by the instructor. The mark of "INC" may be removed and a grade (if taken for a grade) or the letter "S" (if taken "S/U") may be substituted for it by a student making up the deficiencies to the satisfaction of the instructor.

Unless an extension of time is granted by the academic dean, a mark of "INC" must be removed by March first, August first, and November first for the fall and spring semesters and summer session, respectively. For courses taken "S/U," any mark of "INC" not removed by these deadlines will change to "U." For courses taken for a letter grade, any mark of "INC" not removed by these deadlines will change to "I" and be calculated as "F" in the cumulative grade point averages of all undergraduate students, with or without an extension of time. The student who has been granted an extension, however, will have the opportunity to have his or her grade point average recalculated and the "I" changed to the grade assigned.

(h) Grade appeals

Students have a right to appeal decisions on grades. The student should first contact the department from which the grade was received. A member of each department, who is not a major departmental administrator, is designated to hear complaints, gather information, talk with both students and faculty, mediate disputes or identify appropriate channels for solving problems. If the dispute cannot be resolved at this level then the student should state the full particulars of the appeal in writing and submit them to the department chair or policy committee. If the matter is not resolved at the department level, the student may request a hearing before the academic arbitration board of the appropriate school or college. However, the sole responsibility and authority for determining grades rests with the faculty member who assigned the grade. This appeals procedure also may be used if a student believes an opportunity should be provided to make up work missed during absence from classes.

The grade appeals procedure must be started by the end of the fifth week of the spring semester for grades received during fall semester and by the end of the fifth week of fall semester for grades received during the spring semester or during the summer semester. All actions for grade changes must be completed during the semester in which the grade is appealed. Grade and absence grievances may not be appealed beyond the college level.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-47 | Guest undergraduate students- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy explains the requirements for students wishing to study at BGSU without applying to a degree seeking program. This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Any person who has graduated from high school (or earned the GED equivalent) or any person who has attended another university may apply as a guest student. Such a student is not required to submit a high school transcript or ACT or SAT results. Guest students are not eligible for financial aid. Any coursework taken as a guest student will be applicable to a degree program once the student is formally admitted. A guest student is limited to taking sixteen hours of credit without formal admission to the university. The sixteen-hour credit limit shall include all credit hours attempted by the student. If a student fails a class, those hours will be included in the sixteen-hour limit. Once the sixteen-hour credit limit has been reached, the student must apply for formal admission through the office of admissions. Permission to exceed the sixteen-hour credit limit must be obtained from the office of admissions.

(1)

A guest student is required to apply each semester to the office of registration and records. Such a student will register on dates established by the office of registration and records. A guest student may register for undergraduate courses only (4000-level courses or below).

Students who have been denied formal admission to the university cannot enroll as guest students without the permission of the office of admissions. Such a student must contact the office of admissions to receive permission to register as a guest student. A guest student's registration will be withdrawn if it is discovered subsequently that he or she has been denied formal admission and is enrolled without the permission of the office of admissions.

(2) Guest degree holder

A student who has earned a four-year degree in higher education and who wishes to enroll in undergraduate courses without pursuing another degree may enroll as a guest degree holder. Guest degree holders may register for undergraduate courses only (4000-level courses or below). There is no limit to the number of credits a guest degree holder may earn at the university.

The only admission requirement for a guest degree holder is a completed undergraduate guest application, as well as, official confirmation from the appropriate institution of the highest degree received. Students not in continuous attendance must resubmit an undergraduate guest application in order to have access to the registration system. Information regarding registration for succeeding semester may be found here.

(3) Other types of guest students:

(a) Post secondary enrollment options

The post secondary enrollment options program provides qualified high school freshmen through seniors who attend public and chartered non-public Ohio high schools the opportunity to enrich their educational experience by enrolling in college-level coursework. The application and credential deadline for fall semester is April fifteenth and for the spring semester November fifteenth. For additional information contact the office of admissions.

(b) International guest

Non-U.S. citizens can apply as guest students only through the center for international programs. Students currently enrolled in high school who wish to take courses at BGSU should contact the office of admissions.

(c) BGSU students enrolled as guests (transient students) at another institution

Before enrolling at another institution, students are encouraged to verify with the office of registration and records the equivalency of courses from another institution to BGSU courses and to consult with their college advisors concerning the applicability of the courses to their degree program. Grades earned at the other institutions do not become part of the student's record at BGSU but are included in the determination of all honors, and eligibility for some programs.

Applications to register as a guest student may be obtained on-line or an email can be generated to have an application sent by U.S. mail. Applications may be picked up in person at the registration offices on main campus or the Firelands branch in Huron, OH.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-48 | International students- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

International applicants whose native language is not English are required to submit evidence of English language skills in the form of an official test of English as a foreign language (TOEFL), a Michigan English language assessment battery (MELAB), or an international English language testing system (IELTS) score. BGSU requires a TOEFL score of at least five hundred (paper based), one hundred seventy-three (computer based), or sixty-one (internet based); a MELAB score of at least sixty-nine; or an IELTS score of at least six point zero.

Additionally, all international applicants whose native language is not English are required to take an English proficiency test upon reporting to the university and before registering for classes. International students transferring from other colleges or universities in the United States as well as students from Puerto Rico are also required to take these tests. Depending on a students placement score, the university reserves the right to require enrollment in and successful completion of English courses leading to the proficiency level expected in ESOL 1010 & 1040: ESOL 1000, ESOL 1010, ESOL 1030, and ESOL 1040. The university may also limit the number of courses taken for credit.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-49 | Music library copyright restrictions- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Please refer to the following guidelines when making requests for copies of recorded items. These guidelines are in compliance with the federal copyright law and are intended to assure the "fair use" of all recorded materials.

Notice--warning concerning copyright restrictions--The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of the specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess or "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in its judgment fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright law.

(1) All recording requests must be for presentation use only. Students may not request recordings for class study use as a substitute for reserve listening or for applied lessons. Copies cannot be made of recordings placed on class reserve.

(2) Only selections of a recording will be transferred; requests for transfers of entire albums or album sides cannot be honored.

(3) Requests submitted Monday through Thursday will be available within forty-eight hours; Friday through Sunday requests will available the following Tuesday afternoon. While the timeliness of each order will depend on the volume of requests, the production office will make every effort to follow the above time schedule.

(4) If necessary, we can deliver transferred tracks to you by e-mail. Otherwise, bring a blank CD to the music library when you submit a recording request.

If you have questions, please contact the music library at 419-372-2307.

Date: November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-50 | Registration for undergraduate classes- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Registration for the fall and spring semesters consists of two phases: continuing student registration and open registration. During the summer semester, only open registration is used.

Continuing student registration allows currently enrolled students and former students who have readmitted access to the registration system in accordance with the enrollment appointment schedule. New students customarily enroll during an orientation/registration program that also involves placement testing and an introduction to the campus. Guest students must complete a guest application form before participating in open registration, and former students must be readmitted. Applications for readmission and guest student applications can be obtained from the office of registration and records and from the registration and records web site:http://www.bgsu.edu/registration-records.html. Applications for admission as a degree-seeking student can be obtained from the office of admissions, 110 McFall center, 419-372-2478.

All tuition/fees are due and payable prior to the first official day of the semester. If payment or an approved payment arrangement is outstanding, the registration is subject to being cancelled and/or the assessment of late fees and service charges.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-51 | Repeated coursework, enrollment status and financial aid- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

Ensure Title IV funds are being awarded/disbursed in accordance with federal regulations governing enrollment status eligibility. This is a policy about the effect of enrollment status and retaking coursework provisions and limitations on financial aid.

(B) Policy

You may count toward enrollment status and award Title IV funds to a student who is repeating, for the first time only (i.e. one repetition per class), a previously passed course in a term-based program. Students enrolled in a non-term-based programs may not receive credit for retaking coursework. For this purpose, passed means any grade higher than an "F," regardless of any school or program policy requiring a higher qualitative grade or measurement to have been considered to have passed the course.

A student may be repeatedly paid for repeatedly failing the same course (normal satisfactory academic progress policy still applies to such cases). However, if a student passes a class once and then is repaid for retaking it and fails the second time, that failure counts as their paid retake and the student may not be paid for retaking the class a third time.

Date: January 27th, 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-52 | Retaking an undergraduate course- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Students must report each retake registration to the office of registration and records.

A student may retake a course in which a grade of "D," "F," "I," "U," or "WF" was received. If a student retakes such a course at the university, it must be retaken under the same grading option as selected initially. If the course is retaken for the purposes of auditing, no grade will be given.

If a student retakes a course at the university in which a grade of "D," "F," "I," "U," or "WF" was received, then the credit hours and quality points for the original registration and all subsequent retake registrations will be used in computing the student's cumulative grade point average, with the following exceptions:

(1) For the first two such courses retaken at the university (they must be two different courses), the credit hours and quality points for the original registration will not be used in computing the student's accumulative grade point average. For these two courses, the credit hours and quality points for each retake registration will be used in computing the student's cumulative grade point average.

(2) If a student retakes a course at the university in which a grade of "U" was received, it will have no effect on the cumulative grade point average.

(3) Except for the purpose of auditing, a student may not retake a course in which a grade of "C" or better (including "S") was received.

(4) No grade is removed or erased from a transcript by retaking a course.

(5) If the student retakes a course in which a grade of "D" was received, no additional credit hours are thereby earned.

(6) Any punitive grade awarded as a result of an academic honesty case may not have the retake policy applied to it. In cases where the punitive grade is "D,""F," or "WF," students may retake these courses to meet degree requirements, but both grades will be used in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average. In cases where the punitive grade is "U," students may retake these courses and it will have no effect on the cumulative grade point average.

If a student receives a grade of "F," "I," "U," or "WF" in a course and then receives credit for that course by successful completion of a similar course at another institution, the credit hours and quality points for the first registration will continue to be used in computing the student's grade point average.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-53 | Revision of a financial aid award package- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This is a policy about the revision of a financial aid award package. Student financial aid http://www.bgsu.edu/admissions/scholarships-and-financial-aid.html

(B) Policy

Based on a change in your eligibility, your enrollment, or an office or agency error, your financial aid may be revised at any time. If your financial aid has already been credited to your bursar account, you may be responsible for partial or full repayment of the funds, regardless of the reason for the adjustment. Financial aid is contingent upon many factors, including availability of federal, state, and institutional funding. SFA has the right to review, adjust, and cancel a financial aid award at any time due to changes in your financial or academic status or your failure to provide requested documentation.

As required by federal, state and institutional guidelines, revision of your aid package may occur if:

(1) Your aid was based on inaccurate or false information (including estimated income data or grade level)

(2) SFA or another agency made an error in determining your eligibility for, or disbursement of, your financial aid awards.

(3) The amount of financial aid awarded to you exceeds your calculated financial need.

(4) You do not maintain satisfactory academic progress.

(5) You fail to meet enrollment, grade point average, participation, or other requirements required by a specific award.

(6) You drop classes or withdraw from BGSU.

(7) You were selected for verification and completion of the verification process changes your eligibility. In verification, SFA must check the accuracy of the data you report on your FAFSA (free application for federal student aid).

Date: February 2nd, 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-54 | Satisfactory academic progress and financial aid- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

Satisfactory academic progress to be eligible for federal student aid funds, a student must make satisfactory academic progress in both qualitative and quantitative criteria.

(B) Policy

Financial aid academic progress is assessed according to qualitative, quantitative and maximum time frame measures that are described within this policy. All measures must be met for continued aid eligibility. Students failing to meet any single measure of satisfactory academic policy may request re-consideration through an appeal process. This policy assesses all students equally regardless of enrollment status hours. SFA will evaluate SAP annually, place students on probation who are not meeting any one or more of the standard measures for assessment, and require students to fulfill the terms of an academic plan to qualify for further funds.

(1) Satisfactory academic progress requires financial aid recipients to do the following:

(a) Be admitted into a degree/certificate seeking program.

(b) Meet minimum cumulative grade point averages.

(c) Satisfactorily complete at least sixty-seven per cent of cumulative credit hours attempted.

(d) Complete the degree/certificate program within the maximum attempted hours.

(2) Programs governed by this policy:

(a) Federal Pell grant

(b) Federal supplemental educational opportunity grant (SEOG)

(c) Federal Perkins loan

(d) Federal direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans

(e) Federal direct parent loans for undergraduate students (PLUS)

(f) Federal direct graduate PLUS

(g) Federal teacher education assistance for college and higher education grant (TEACH)

(h) Iraq and Afghanistan service grant

(i) Federal work study

(j) Nursing loans

(k) State scholarship and grant programs (example: Ohio college opportunity grant)

(l) BGSU sponsored scholarship and grant programs

(m) Private alternative loan programs (depends on the lender)

(n) BGSU short term emergency loan programs

When it is determined a student has failed to meet any one or more measures of SAP, the students financial aid eligibility will be suspended. Appeals may be submitted if there are mitigating circumstances that warrant a student to continue to receive funds. Appeals must be submitted by the following dates to be considered for eligibility for that semester:

(i) Summer July first

(ii) Fall October first

(iii) Spring March first

SFA has the final authority to determine if financial aid will be extended or denied to a student. Decisions made by an SFA counselor or the SFA committee are conclusive and cannot be appealed.

Date: January 27th, 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-55 | Scholarship appeal-undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy outlines the scholarship appeal process to allow a student to petition to receive his/her scholarship(s) after not meeting the minimum cGPA and course load requirements.

(B) Policy

A students cGPA is reviewed annually, after spring term, to determine if his/her scholarship(s) will automatically be renewed or if the scholarship(s) will be revoked. A student who does not meet the scholarship renewal criteria is given the opportunity to appeal the decision to suspend his/her scholarship(s) based on extenuating circumstances. The student must complete the scholarship appeal form supplying detailed information explaining the circumstance and provide documentation to support the appeal. Once the appeal is received, the scholarship committee will meet to discuss the appeal, and subsequently render a decision to either approve or deny the appeal. The scholarship committee has the final authority to determine if the scholarship(s) will be extended or denied a student. Decisions made by the scholarship committee are conclusive and cannot be appealed.

A student may also complete a scholarship appeal form to appeal to use his/her scholarship(s) in the summer term or at a less than full-time course load, with the understanding that this will count as a full term of usage toward the maximum eight terms of eligibility. Students wishing to utilize one of these options must complete a scholarship appeal form requesting to use their funds.

(1) Scholarship renewal requires the following:

(a) Students in cohorts prior to 2138 must maintain two point seventy five cGPA and a full-time course load at the end of the spring term.

(b) Students in cohorts 2138 or after must maintain a three point zero cGPA and a full-time course load at the end of the spring term.

(2) Reasons for appeal approval:

(a) Documented medical issues which have since been resolved. If a student does not submit the medical documentation showing dates of illness and the prognosis, the appeal can either be denied, or the committee can request additional documentation from the student.

(b) Documented family situation which adversely affected students ability to concentrate (such as family issues at home when student started/attended college, death in the family or a close relative (would need documentation showing the date of death of the relative), etc.).

(c) The student realizes that he/she didnt focus on school initially and are now making improvement in their GPA by utilizing various support services across campus.

(d) Using a scholarship at less than full-time enrollment. This appeal type still counts as one term of scholarship usage even though the scholarship value may be reduced below what is typically awarded during a "regular" semester of full-time enrollment.

(e) Summer usage of a scholarship.

(f) Students who have not attended classes for more than one semester (usually due to co-ops, study abroad, or stopping out), who have had their scholarships removed.

(3) Reasons for appeal denial:

(a) Adjustment to college and the coursework rigor required in college

(b) Homesickness

(c) Change in major

(d) Student has used all eight semesters of their scholarship eligibility. Appeals are not granted for additional terms because the student added another major, changed majors, etc.

(e) Students requesting to use all of his/her scholarship monies within one semester. The excess scholarship funds which a student doesnt utilize (due to an early graduation, for example) cannot be "cashed out" or applied to one semester of fees due.

Date: February 4th, 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-56 | Student Appeals- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

Appeals for waivers or substitutions of requirements are processed through the student's college office and may require consultations, recommendations, or approvals from other offices. Substitutions in the major, for example, require a recommendation from the department that teaches that major. Substitutions in the minor require approval from the department or college that teaches that minor, even if it is not in the college of the student's major.

Date: November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-57 | Transfer admissions- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

(1) Students who have attempted twelve or more hours, excluding remedial or developmental courses since high school, at a college or university other than Bowling Green state university, are considered transfer applicants. Transfer students must have a minimum accumulative grade point average (GPA), among all schools, of two point zero or better on a four-point scale. Some transfer students may be eligible for admissions priority, including:

(a) Ohio residents with an associate degree, a completed Ohio transfer module, and a GPA of two point zero for all previous college-level courses have admissions priority over out-of-state associate degree graduates and transfer students.

(b) Associate degree holders who do not have a completed Ohio transfer module will be eligible for preferential admissions if they have a GPA of at least two point zero for all previous college-level courses.

(c) Students who are not enrolled in A.A., A.S. or Applied Associate degree programs but who have earned sixty semester or ninety quarter hours or more of credit toward a baccalaureate degree with a GPA of at least two point zero for all previous college-level courses will be eligible for preferential consideration for admission as transfer students.

Admission to the university does not guarantee admission into a specific college or major/program. Students not only transfer into the university but also, eventually, into a specific college and major/program within the university. Those colleges and majors/programs may have additional requirements (including higher GPAs, courses, etc.) to those required for admission to the university. Prospective transfer students should consult college advisors for advice about curricular planning and about college policies that may affect their academic career.

(2) Transfer students must demonstrate competence in English/writing, mathematics, and reading through course credit or placement exams before advancing to degree completion. Main campus students should contact the office of new student orientation and First year programs for more information about placement. BGSU Firelands students should contact academic and student services for information about placement exams.

A transfer student who wishes to enroll at BGSU as an undergraduate must submit the following:

(a) Application for admission and non refundable application fee;

(b) Official transcripts of credit for each college or university the student has attended, including unaccredited institutions. Transcripts must be submitted to the office of admissions. Failure to indicate previous college attendance may result in refusal of admission, no transfer of credit, and/or expulsion from the university if discovered subsequently;

(c) Transfer students who have completed less than thirty semester hours (forty-five quarter hours), will also need official final high school transcript or equivalent sent from the school by the high school counselor or principal. Note, however, that although a high school transcript may not be required for admission, a student may need to provide a transcript for other reasons (for example, to document a request for waiver of certain degree requirements).

For more information about admissions procedures and instructions, see the office of admissions. If you are admitted to the university, you will also receive an evaluation of your transfer credits. See the transfer credit policy for more information.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-58 | Transfer credit-undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy explains the requirements for accepting undergraduate transfer credit from another institution and/or other qualifying experiences. The policy also addresses how transfer credits may be applied towards BGSU degree requirements and an appeals process. Students are also referred to "general education curriculum" and the "Ohio transfer module" for more specific information about the transfer general education credits. This policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html.

(B) Policy

(1) Acceptable collegiate sources for credit transfer

Universities and colleges with accreditations or that are candidates for accreditation by one of the regional accrediting associations, (such as north central association of colleges and schools) and colleges and universities in foreign countries that hold official recognition in the specific country in which located:

(a) Credit awarded may be exact BGSU course equivalent credit when a course is substantially the same as an existing BGSU course. (Example: History of U.S. to Civil War = History 2050);

(b) When a course for which transfer credit is requested has no equivalent in the same department at BGSU, credit may be awarded in that department but with no course number assigned. (Example: history of India = history elective);

(c) When the course is in a department not existing at BGSU, credit may be awarded in a different department. (Example: anthropology assigned to sociology, some photography courses assigned to art or technology);

(d) Credit may be deferred when equivalency cannot be determined by the office of registration and records. Procedures exist for the further evaluation of deferred credit by faculty members in an appropriate department.

Bowling Green state university does not generally accept transfer credit from institutions lacking accreditation from one of the six regional accrediting agencies (e.g., North Central association). However, such transfer of credit is possible, particularly if the originating institution has accreditation from a disciplinary-based accrediting agency recognized by the council for higher education accreditation (CHEA).

(i) Credit may be accepted only upon the recommendation of the specific department/school/program and college in which the coursework is offered;

(ii) Decisions about validation of courses should be based on demonstrated student competencies, rather than on a comparison of syllabi or course descriptions. The specific means for determining competencies will be up to the individual department, school, or program, with college-level approval.

(2) Transfer of credit

Bowling Green state university awards transfer credit for formal coursework of baccalaureate level from an acceptable collegiate source as described in the "Acceptable collegiate sources for credit transfer" section of this catalog. All courses with passing grades, including grades of "D" that carry quality points of 1.0 or greater (on a 4.0 scale) will transfer. Individual degree or program requirements may demand a higher grade than "D" in selected courses. Those standards will apply equally to transfer courses and to courses taken at BGSU.

For information on transfer credit equivalencies, click on the following link: u.select - a course applicability system.

(3) Responsibilities of students in credit transfers

In order to facilitate transfer with maximum applicability of transfer credit, prospective transfer students should plan a course of study that will meet the requirements of a degree program at the receiving institution. Transfer assurance guides (TAGs) are designed to provide advice about course selection that will guarantee that courses taken within a TAG will transfer and apply to particular majors. Specifically, students should identify early in their collegiate studies an institution and major to which they desire to transfer. Furthermore, students should determine if there are language requirements or any special course requirements, such as prerequisite courses or the initial parts of course sequences that can be met during the freshman or sophomore year. This will enable students to plan and pursue a course of study that will articulate with the receiving institution's major. Students are encouraged to seek further information regarding transfer from their advisor, the college or university to which they plan to transfer, and from the Ohio board of regents at http://regents.ohio.gov/transfer/tags/index.php.

(4) Acceptable noncollegiate sources for credit transfer

(a) Program on noncollegiate sponsored instruction (PONSI). The American council on education (ACE) acts as a recommending agency for coursework offered by diverse noncollegiate organizations. Course descriptions, together with credit recommendations, are available in ACE's national guide to credit recommendations for noncollegiate courses.

(i) Credit is accepted generally as recommended by ACE for lower-division (1000-2000 level) courses at BGSU;

(ii) Course credit recommendations for work which is on the upper-division (3000-4000 level) at BGSU may be subject to validation by appropriate departments before credit can be granted.

(b) Educational experiences in the armed services. The American council on education (ACE) also accredits work offered by the U.S. armed services. Course descriptions and credit recommendations are available in its publication guide to the evaluation of educational experiences in the armed services.

(i) Credit is accepted generally as recommended by ACE;

(ii) Normally, all credit accepted is non-equivalent course credit;

(iii) Equivalent course credit where appropriate may be subject to evaluation and recommendation of appropriate departments.

(c) Experiential learning

(i) Credit for experiential learning may be granted for educational experience outside the classroom that corresponds to material taught at the university;

(ii) Credit for experiential learning may be granted through credit by examination;

(iii) An eighty dollar fee is assessed for each course granted for successful completion of the credit by examination for validation of experiential learning;

(iv) Experiential learning is also measured by portfolio assessment. Further information regarding portfolio submission procedures is available at the nontraditional student services office or at www.bgsu.edu/ntss

(5) Appeal of credit transfer

Students or institutions wishing to challenge a Bowling Green state university transfer of credit decision may submit a written appeal to the office of registration and records, which will determine whether a policy is at issue. If a policy is at issue, the office of registration and records will perform the appropriate research and send the appeal to the undergraduate council. A subcommittee of the undergraduate council will review all available information and make a recommendation to the office of academic affairs. The office of academic affairs will give final approval or disapproval of the undergraduate council's recommendation.

Date: January 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-59 | Catalog policies- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

This catalog is a guide to the programs, policies, and courses that are part of undergraduate life at Bowling Green state university, a complex learning community. Students need to be aware of opportunities and requirements at several levels to guarantee that they take advantage of all that Bowling Green has to offer and can make steady progress toward academic goals.

The university comprises seven undergraduate colleges, which are subdivided into schools, departments, and programs. Faculty create and offer the courses that students take to fulfill academic requirements for undergraduate degrees. The colleges are responsible for the integrity of degree programs based on the academic fields. All degrees are conferred officially by the university. Students satisfy requirements at the university, college, and major/specialization levels. Students may also be involved with academic programs that are supervised by the office of the provost and vice president for academic affairs. In addition, students have periodic contact with the bursars office, admissions office, office of student financial aid, and office of registration and records.

(1) The information in this catalog was last updated October 17, 2014. All information in this catalog is subject to change. Except as specifically stated herein, Bowling Green state university makes no representation or contract that following a particular course or curriculum will result in specific achievement, employment or qualification for employment, admission to degree programs, or licensing for particular professions or occupations.

(2) Students are responsible for knowing all requirements and policies in this catalog, particularly the expressed academic policies.

(3) Each of the colleges provides an overview of its degree programs in this catalog. Consult the indexes listed in catalog area "colleges and programs" to find which college offers programs in a particular area of interest. Colleges, departments, and programs provide more detailed information in separate publications, available on request. Students are advised to become familiar with BGSU publications in their area of interest as well as appropriate parts of this catalog. Students should closely study the check sheet that summarizes all requirements and options for their chosen major.

(4) The university reserves the right to change its course offerings, academic policies, and requirements for the baccalaureate and associate degrees. To protect students from unnecessary penalty where changes in degree requirements occur, the following policies in regard to the undergraduate catalog are in effect:

(a) Regardless of their semester of matriculation, students are typically governed by the policies in the most current catalog. Students are governed by the degree requirements in the catalog of their matriculation.

(b) Students may elect to complete a degree program under the most recent catalog. If this choice is made, then the student must complete all degree requirements specified in the selected catalog.

(c) Students who transfer from one BGSU college to another follow the catalog of the time of their transfer.

(d) Students who transfer from another institution follow the catalog of the time of their initial registration for courses at BGSU.

(e) Students who initiate but do not complete a program and return to the university follow the degree requirements specified by the dean of the college in which they are enrolled at the time of their return.

(f) Questions concerning catalog policy should be directed to the appropriate college advisement office or to the office of the provost and vice president for academic affairs.

(5) Courses are identified by a two-, three-, or four-letter abbreviation and a number. Course descriptions are listed online in alphabetical order by course prefix. Current information about course offerings can be found on the BGSU web at the following location: http://csspublic.bgsu.edu/psc/cs9prd/employee/hrms/c/community_access.sss_ browse_catlg.gbl?&.

(6) The semester schedule of classes should be used in conjunction with this catalog to determine course availability, because not every course is offered every semester. Class offerings for specific sessions can be found on the BGSU web at the following location: https://webapp.bgsu.edu/ClassSearch/search.htm.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-60 | University libraries collection polices- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy provides general guidelines and rules for use of the university libraries.

(B) Policy

(1) General collection

The general collection should serve the needs of the Bowling Green state university community either through ownership of items, consortial agreements, or electronic access. Current, seminal, and classic materials are added to the collection based on curricular needs, regardless of format. All selection decisions should make the most effective use of budget resources for the greatest number of users according to the priorities established by this policy.

Subject collection development statements provide detail and guidance for purchasing decisions for the general collection.

(2) Statement of purpose

In keeping with the mission for collection development, these pages set forth criteria and policies to use when selecting materials for the university libraries collection. This policy seeks to create a flexible framework for balancing abundant needs against scarce resources in a way that is both systematic and equitable as far as possible.

(3) Mission statement

To fulfill its part of the BGSU university libraries mission, the collection development unit is charged with the building and preservation of effective, high-quality collections including electronic access to information. The unit will coordinate the selection and management of materials in electronic, print, and other formats to meet the current and long-term teaching, research, and administrative needs of the university community. Within the "OhioLINK" environment and in cooperation with other Ohio academic libraries, the collection development unit strives to optimize effective use of personnel and financial resources by balancing access and ownership considerations and by building on recognized collection strengths.

(4) Diversity

In keeping with Bowling Green state universitys curricular emphasis on multiculturalism, the university libraries seek to provide materials representative of many cultures and ideas.

(5) Cooperative collection development

(a) Cooperation within "OhioLINK"

Cooperation among libraries delivers more information from a wider variety of sources than a single library can provide, permits better resource allocation, and leads to more intensive use of collections. Many resources are shared among Ohio colleges and universities via "OhioLINK's" online borrowing initiative. Electronic databases and other resources are made available to "OhioLINK" member institutions through consortium contracts. Collection development decisions regarding these shared electronic resources are made through the "OhioLINK" cooperative information resources management (CIRM) committee, on which the coordinator of collections represents the university libraries.

The university libraries also contribute holdings information to the "OhioLINK" central catalog, will work through the CIRM committee to identify areas of collection strength and fully participate in "OhioLINK" statewide cooperative collection development initiatives. In general, the university libraries avoid unnecessary duplication of materials available within "OhioLINK." Materials widely held within "OhioLINK" (six to eight or more copies) should receive careful evaluation before purchase. This evaluation should include consideration of the importance of the work for curricular support; the number of copies available within "OhioLINK" and the time of the academic year; and other local needs. Local purchase of items with large numbers of copies in "OhioLINK" is restricted to only highest priority items. Conversely, purchases of materials held in no or very few "OhioLINK" libraries will not only meet local needs, but will enhance the diversity of "OhioLINK" holdings.

(b) Cooperation with other libraries

An agreement between Bowling Green state university and the university of Toledo- health science campus governs materials purchases for the joint nursing program: Bowling Green state university provides materials supporting the general education component and the university of Toledo - health science campus supplies the specialized nursing materials.

(c) Censorship/intellectual freedom

The Bowling Green state university libraries support the free exchange of ideas and endeavor to build collections which include all points of view. At the same time, they neither approve nor endorse the views expressed in materials included in the collections. Where there is controversy or disagreement concerning the truth of particular ideas and issues of belief, the university libraries attempt to provide a wide selection of materials encompassing the major viewpoints.

The Bowling Green state university libraries subscribe to and comply with the American library association library code of ethics. Titles for the collection are selected on the basis of overall content. No item is excluded on the basis of the author's race, nationality, or political or religious views. That some patrons may find an item objectionable on moral, religious, political or other grounds does not restrict or determine selection.

The Bowling Green state university libraries do not accede to requests of individuals or groups seeking the removal from the collection of materials which have been chosen according to this collection development policy, nor do they yield to requests to add to the collection materials if their addition would contradict this collection development policy.

The coordinator of collections in consultation with the library administration responds to all questions concerning the propriety of specific materials in the Bowling Green state university libraries. Persons or groups desiring further dialogue or action are referred to the dean of university libraries and/or to the library advisory committee.

(6) Priorities

(a) Priorities for collection development are as follows:

(i) To support the curricular needs of undergraduate students

(ii) To support faculty teaching needs

(iii) To support graduate research in selected areas, based upon graduate programs

(iv) To support faculty research

(v) To support leisure reading and community needs beyond the university

(7) Note

Highly specialized materials are purchased very selectively. Electronic access, "OhioLINK" borrowing, interlibrary loan or document delivery should be relied upon to provide more specialized information needed by researchers.

(8) Core selection criteria

These are essential factors that should be considered for any addition to the collection. Additional criteria applicable to special formats are listed in the sections dealing with those formats.

Support of one or more collection development priorities, regardless of format.

(a) Value -- content, format, physical condition, and cost effectiveness (anticipated use versus cost).

(b) Collection level -- appropriateness of the subject content and intellectual level of material to the stated subject collection development level.

(c) Authority -- originates from a recognized authority on the subject.

(d) Currency of information.

(e) Access -- availability from an external source through electronic access, interlibrary loan, "OhioLINK," document delivery, or another source.

(9) Languages collected

The university libraries collect materials primarily in the English language for the general collection. Translations of foreign language materials are normally preferred to the originals. There are three prominent exceptions:

(a) Literature, literary criticism, and materials relating to foreign cultures appropriate to language department curricula

(b) Selected major foreign newspapers and periodicals

(c) When information is required in a particular foreign language or is not available in English

(10) Collection levels

In each subject area represented in the university curriculum, collection development librarians select materials in appropriate formats to the depth needed to support the degree programs in place. The levels of collecting for each type of degree program follow; they are adapted from the WLN Conspectus. It should be understood that these levels represent an ideal that will be pursued to the extent that funds permit.

(a) Undergraduate:

This level provides resources adequate for imparting and maintaining knowledge about the basic or primary topics of a subject area. It includes a broad range of basic works in appropriate formats, classic retrospective materials, key journals on primary topics, selected journals and seminal works on secondary topics, access to appropriate machine-readable data files, and the reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. It supports to a lesser extent subjects that are taught but in which no degree is offered.

(b) Master's:

This level provides resources adequate for imparting and maintaining knowledge about primary and secondary topics of a subject area. It includes and/or provides access to a significant number of seminal works and journals on the primary and secondary topics in the field; a significant number of retrospective materials; a substantial collection of works by secondary figures; works that provide more in-depth discussions of research, techniques, and evaluation.

(c) Doctoral:

This level includes and/or provides access to the major published source materials required for dissertation and independent research, reporting new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes and/or provides access to important reference works, to a wide selection of specialized monographs, to an extensive collection of journals, and to major indexing and abstracting services in the field. Crucial foreign language materials are included. Older material is retained if pertinent for historical research.

(11) Gifts

Gifts in kind are essential for enriching the quality and range of the university libraries collections. This is most true when items are rare or unique. Bowling Green state university libraries welcomes and solicits such gifts when items support the teaching, research, and other collection needs of the university. Such materials are useful, enduring additions to its resources. These include books, manuscripts, sound recordings, and other objects.

However, in many cases, collection managers will not add materials to the holdings for a variety of reasons, which may include: duplication of existing titles, poor physical condition of the gift, or the materials do not fall under the collection scope of the library. Gifts not selected for the library may be sold or recycled for the benefit of the library.

BGSU libraries also accept funds for the purchase of items, which enhance existing collections and support BGSU instructional and research programs.

(12) Approval plan for monographs

The university libraries have an approval plan with a major vendor chiefly to supply materials for undergraduate curricular needs. The approval plan provides new monographs as quickly as possible, and gives selectors the advantage of reviewing the books first hand before making a decision.

Collection development librarians and vendor representatives have devised a subject profile, which specifies one of three levels of coverage for each subject included in the BGSU curriculum:

(a) Books are sent on approval for subjects that are central to the curriculum.

(b) Notification slips are sent to inform library faculty that books on less central subjects are available.

(c) Materials are excluded; no books or notification slips are sent.

Subjects not covered by the curriculum or materials systematically acquired by other means are excluded entirely. The vendor ships books or notification slips on a weekly basis as determined by the profile.

Bowling Green state university libraries do not place "on approval" orders for material other than what is received on the approval plan, nor do they accept offers from a company or salesperson to send material "on approval." Exception is made on a case-by-case basis for expensive non-book materials, for which price may make an on-site review desirable before selection.

(13) Monographs

The university libraries have set up an approval plan to supply monographs, chiefly for undergraduate curricular needs. The approval plan is complemented by funds made available to departmental faculty to recommend materials for purchase; it is expected that these recommendations will reflect faculty and graduate-level research needs. Librarians will make further selections to fill in gaps.

(a) Selection guidelines for monographs

(i) Multiple copies

Only one copy of a title is normally purchased for the general collection; this does not preclude purchase of different editions of a title. Possible exceptions are:

(a) When few or no circulating copies are held by other "OhioLINK" libraries.

(b) A book is placed on reserve.

(c) An item receives very high use.

(d) A volume is received as a gift.

(ii) Paper/hard bound books

Paperbacks when available are supplied for the approval plan and are preferred for firm orders. Gifts may be added in either form. New paperback volumes that are oversized, more than two inches thick, or longer than tall are generally sent to the commercial binder for binding before circulating.

(iii) Textbooks

Textbooks are very selectively added to the general collection on the basis of currency, comprehensiveness, and when they provide the best or only treatment of a needed subject. Otherwise, textbooks, including accompanying manuals, workbooks, and other auxiliary materials, are normally not purchased for the general collection. Other books used as texts for specific courses may be added to the general collection, but are not systematically acquired.

(a) E-books textbooks

Normally the university libraries does not purchase textbooks. The only exception is for topics where information is not compiled in another book format, for instance, social sciences research methodology.

Acquisition (lease or purchase) of e-books for class-related student use may be made according to the following guidelines:

(i) Faculty should consider e-books for classroom support, that are already available from ebrary, "NetLibrary," or via the "OhioLINK" e-book center (e.g. Springer, Oxford titles)

(ii) E-books should be supplementary reading and not a primary required text for the course. Any supplementary texts should have a strong likelihood of use by some students. The libraries cannot meet the demand by all students for electronic books with regularly required reading assignments.

(iii) E-book purchases as for classroom support should be titles that the libraries normally might purchase, according to our collection development policy.

(iv) For new purchases, we will acquire e-books from vendors with whom we have established business relationships ("NetLibrary" and "E-brary") and whose e-books are readily accessible from the library catalog.

(v) The preferred access model is one that makes multiple simultaneous uses available at no additional cost. If multiple simultaneous use at no additional cost is not an option, we will purchase one copy (or one simultaneous user) of an e-book.

(vi) Faculty wishing to make a required text available should be encouraged to place a personal copy on reserve, or make selected chapters available, as permitted by US copyright law and fair use guidelines, via the e-reserve system.

(iv) Microforms

Materials are acquired in microformat either because of cost, for backup, or for preservation reasons. Fiche is generally the preferred format.

(v) Local authors

Books written by Bowling Green state university employees or alumni are added to the general collection as needed to support the curriculum. Archival copies of books by Bowling Green state university authors, primarily current faculty, are placed in the center for archival collections. Books by authors from the city of Bowling Green and surrounding area will be added to the collection as needed to support the curriculum.

(vi) Leisure reading

Bestsellers and other popular works are added to the collection as needed to support the curriculum.

(vii) Replacement

Missing or damaged books are replaced if the information they contain remains relevant to the curriculum and is of current or lasting value. An outdated book on a topic still relevant to the curriculum may be replaced with a newer edition of the same book or with a comparable up-to-date title. Details of the replacement policy are stated in the guidelines for the replacement of missing and damaged books.

(viii) Dissertations/theses

Dissertations abstracts international and other bibliographic indices provide indexing and abstracting of academic theses and dissertations. Non Bowling Green state university dissertations and theses are not actively collected, but may be purchased at the recommendation of a faculty member.

BGSU theses and dissertations are accessible at the "OhioLINK" ETD site (www.ohiolink.edu/etd). The center for archival collections preserves a microfilm security copy of creative writing theses which are not submitted to the ETD site.

(14) Materials not collected

The following types of material are not collected for the general collection. This statement does not preclude these types of material being collected by the appropriate special collection(s).

(a) Juvenile books

(b) Games or other realia

(c) Three dimensional objects

(d) Art works

(e) Posters

(f) Pamphlets

(g) Musical scores

(h) Musical recordings

(i) Maps

(j) Manuscripts

(k) Archival materials

(l) Serial genre fiction

(m) Photographs

(15) Serials

The serials collection provides materials for undergraduate and graduate student use and the specialized research resources for advanced graduate student and faculty use. The serials collection consists of journals accessible at the "OhioLINK" electronic journal center, locally-subscribed periodicals and standing orders, and open access electronic journals.

Because journals have traditionally been the primary vehicle of scholarly communication, they form a very prominent part of the general collection and absorb much of its budget. Unless the university libraries materials budget is sufficient to support new serial subscriptions, new subscriptions may be opened only if existing subscriptions of equivalent cost are cancelled.

(16) Selection criteria for journals

In addition to the core selection criteria, the following criteria should be considered in reviewing a new journal subscription.

Where possible, electronic access, or electronic access with print, should be preferred to print only. Subscriptions to print and electronic versions of the same title may be held. The print subscription should be cancelled when its use becomes low if we have determined that the publisher provides adequate archival access terms for the subscription period. The university Libraries will add electronic access to a print subscription for titles where the added cost for electronic access is less than one hundred dollars. If the added cost for e-access exceeds one hundred dollars and the materials budget cannot absorb the additional cost, subscriptions will need to be cancelled to cover the added cost.

Open access or other free electronic journals added to the library catalog should receive the same scrutiny as other journal subscriptions.

At this time, the university libraries do not attempt to archive electronic journals for future access, but rely upon other sites to provide access to journal archives. Perpetual access rights to subscribed content should be sought to allow for future archival access.

In addition to the core selection criteria, the following criteria should be considered in reviewing a new journal subscription:

(a) Determine whether print or electronic version is the version of record for the journal, or if content in both is equivalent.

(b) Inclusion of fulltext in and comprehensiveness of coverage by a database. In general, do not duplicate current, comprehensive fulltext database journal coverage with a local subscription.

(c) Indexing accessible at Bowling Green state university.

(d) Perpetual electronic access rights to the subscribed content.

(e) Search engine available on the publisher web site and/or indexing available at Bowling Green state university.

(f) Fulltext of the journal available directly from the publisher web site.

(g) Back issues available to subscribers, preferably from the publisher web site.

(h) Software support necessary for journal access.

(i) Articles available in HTML and/or PDF.

(j) Reasonable cost, especially if print and electronic versions differ considerably in scope or coverage.

(k) Do not purchase a subscription to any ejournal that "OhioLINK" is negotiating for, or that "OhioLINK" has made available.

(17) Selection criteria for newspapers

The university libraries seek to provide electronic access to online versions of newspapers according to the following criteria:

(a) Selected major national newspapers which directly support teaching and research needs.

(b) Selective coverage of predominant regional and local newspapers.

(c) Selected Ohio and Michigan newspapers.

(d) Major alternative press titles (e.g. the "Village Voice").

(e) International newspapers which support the curricular needs of the foreign language departments.

(f) International newspapers which allow students from abroad to keep informed of events in their homelands. In most cases, the university libraries subscribe to or accept gifts for only one newspaper from a given country.

Subscriptions to print newspapers are highly selective and limited to a few national, regional, and local newspapers.

(18) Electronic databases

Any Web-based, electronic, audio-visual, or multimedia resource format may be considered for inclusion in the general collection; these may be indexing and abstracting resources, reference materials, or fulltext or numeric databases. New products which enhance awareness of or accessibility to the university libraries' current holdings of journals, books, and other resources are given priority. The university Libraries do not duplicate access locally in any format to databases that are identical, similar, or equivalent to "OhioLINK" databases.

(19) Selection criteria for electronic resources

In addition to the core selection factors, the following criteria should be considered in reviewing a new electronic database:

(a) Comprehensiveness: scope, subject coverage, time span, frequency of updates.

(b) Functionality: Ease of use, quick load time; if Web site, well maintained.

(c) Quality of indexing, search engine.

(d) Preservation, storage, and archiving of data; stability of web-based resource.

(e) Anticipated number of users, based upon the specific courses that will be served.

(f) Special attention should be given to authority and currency.

(g) Type of access, e.g. web access with authenticated remote access, standalone workstation or specific IP address access only, access by a restricted number of simultaneous users vs. campus-wide access; local network, circulation from general stacks.

(20) Electronic, audio-visual, and multimedia materials

(a) Audio-visual

The university libraries selectively purchases audio-visual materials which meet the core selection criteria. Audio-visual materials are purchased from monograph funds. Collection development librarians must balance monograph purchases between books and audio-visual resources according to the needs of the discipline.

In general, DVDs are currently preferred, in the US format. So long as VHS equipment is available in the library or on campus, VHS tapes may be purchased if DVD is not available and if no copy is available via "OhioLINK."

Audio recordings are not purchased for the general collection. All audio recordings are housed in the music library and sound recordings archives.

University libraries purchase digital video from films for the humanities and sciences or ambrose video for the "OhioLINK" digital video center. If the video title is owned by an "OhioLINK" library, BGSU will purchase the digital rights for two hundred dollars. If the title is not owned in "OhioLINK," BGSU will purchase the title and the digital rights. The funds for the video itself will come from the monograph fund. In all cases, funds for obtaining "OhioLINK" digital rights will come from the "OhioLINK" digital video rights fund.

(b) Computer applications

The Bowling Green state university libraries do not purchase or maintain a collection of standard microcomputer applications such as word processing, database applications, or spreadsheets, etc. However, they may acquire college level computer-assisted instruction packages that support the university curriculum. These could include, but are not limited to, tutorials, simulations, drill and practice exercises.

(c) Books with appended computer disks or audio recordings

The university libraries purchase books with accompanying material on machine-readable disk, audio cassette, or compact disk, where items fall within subject area collection development policies, regardless of the availability on campus of hardware for accessing them.

Books with accompanying disks or cassettes should be located in the collection appropriate to the subject content of the item and may be circulated based on regular loan policies for that collection. These items need not be placed on reserve, unless specifically requested by a professor for class use.

(21) Mediated online searching

This policy does not cover librarian-mediated online searching, whether conducted at the reference desk in answer to a reference query or as a fee-based search.

Date: February 2015

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-61 | University libraries gift policy- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy provides general guidelines and rules for giving to the university libraries.

(B) Policy

Gifts in kind are essential for enriching the quality and range of the university libraries collections. This is most true when items are rare or unique. Bowling Green state university libraries welcomes and solicits such gifts when items support the teaching, research, and other collection needs of the university. Such materials are useful, enduring additions to its resources. These include books, manuscripts, sound recordings, and other objects.

However, in many cases, collection managers will not add materials to the holdings for a variety of reasons, which may include: duplication of existing titles, poor physical condition of the gift, or the materials do not fall under the collection scope of the library. Gifts not selected for the library may be sold or recycled for the benefit of the library. Additional specific information is found and updated on the university libraries site http://www.bgsu.edu/library/about/GivingtotheBGSULibrary.html.

BGSU libraries also accept funds for the purchase of items, which enhance existing collections and support BGSU instructional and research programs. For more information about how to donate money, visit our giving opportunities page.

Date: November 1st, 2013

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3341
Amplifies: 3341
Rule 3341-3-62 | University library privacy and confidentiality policy- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy provides general guidelines and rules for use of the university libraries.

(B) Policy

It is the policy of the university libraries at Bowling Green state university that the privacy of all users and the confidentiality of all library records will be protected to the fullest extent possible under state and federal laws and in accordance with the professional standards and guidelines established by the American library association. In most circumstances, library records are kept confidential and are governed by current Ohio Revised Code and can only be released under limited circumstances as noted in section 149.432 of the Revised Code.

In order to provide services of the highest quality and to meet certain legal requirements, the university libraries collects selected user information and maintains that information while the patron is affiliated with BGSU. Information regarding specific transactions is retained only for as long as it is necessary to furnish a specific service. Although we cannot guarantee the security of electronic transactions, the university libraries does not deliberately associate electronic transactions with specific patrons unless that association is administratively necessary.

(1) Third-party service providers

University libraries uses a variety of third-party services to help us understand the use of our services, such as Google analytics. Third-party service providers may collect information sent by your browser as part of a web page request, such as cookies or your IP address. We use this data only for purposes of providing or improving services to patrons.

University libraries patrons enjoy expanded access to materials and services made available via the "OhioLINK" consortium. "OhioLINK" has its own privacy policy, as do many "OhioLINK" member libraries.

Date: September 2012. Original privacy and confidentiality statement adopted 1988.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-63 | Unsatisfactory academic progress- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

A student whose cumulative BGSU grade point average is at least two point zero is considered to be in good academic standing at the university.

(1) The following table describes the conditions under which the student has unsatisfactory academic progress:

A student whose cumulative BGSU GPA falls below two point zero at the end of the semester will be placed on academic warning, unless the student's GPA falls in the probation/suspension/dismissal range. If the student's GPA is in the probation/suspension/dismissal range, the student will be:

(a) Placed on probation if the student has attempted* fewer than twelve letter-graded credit hours at BGSU, or if the student's cumulative GPA is in the probation/suspension/dismissal range for the first time;

(b) Placed on suspension if the student has attempted* twelve or more letter-graded credit hours at BGSU, and if the student has been placed on probation in any previous semester.

(c) Dismissed if the student has attempted* twelve or more letter-graded credit hours at BGSU, and if the student has been placed on suspension in any previous semester.

*Attempted hours include all courses that contribute to the GPA, including those for which the student received credit by earning grades of A, B, C, or D or for which the student did not receive credit due to grades of F, WF, or I.

Students who are not in good academic standing at the university may not transfer credits from another institution until they have returned to good standing at BGSU. Because grades are not transferred to BGSU, courses taken at another institution may not be used to improve a student's GPA at BGSU.

(2) Academic warning

If a student's cumulative BGSU GPA is in the warning range, the student is placed on academic warning and is encouraged to limit enrollment to no more than twelve hours in a given semester until the student is in good academic standing. Students on academic warning are expected to seek appropriate advice and services from their college office or another academic support area. Students on academic warning are expected to increase attention to academic activities and decrease hours committed to non-academic activities.

(3) Academic probation

If a student's cumulative BGSU GPA is in the probation/suspension/dismissal range, the student will be placed on probation:

(a) Who has attempted fewer than twelve hours of letter-graded credit at BGSU; or

(b) Who has a cumulative GPA in the probation/suspension/dismissal range for the first time.

To improve their cumulative GPA to at least the warning range, students on academic probation are strongly advised to enroll for no more than twelve credit hours in any semester and are expected to work with their college office to develop a plan for improving their academic performance. Students on probation are expected to increase attention to academic activities and decrease hours committed to non-academic activities. It should be noted that teams, clubs, and other student organizations have the right to use academic standards to limit participation in their organization. In addition, the students on academic probation must adhere to any conditions as determined by the dean of their college.

Students who do not improve their cumulative GPA to at least the warning range will be placed on academic suspension if they have attempted twelve or more hours of letter-graded credit at BGSU.

(4) Academic suspension

If a student's cumulative BGSU GPA is in the probation/suspension/dismissal range, the student will be placed on suspension:

(a) Who has attempted twelve or more hours of letter-graded credit at BGSU; and

(b) Who has a been placed on probation in any previous semester.

A student who has been suspended may not enroll at the university for a period of two consecutive semesters, including summer semester. Students suspended following the fall semester may not return to the university in the subsequent spring or summer semesters. Students suspended following the spring semester may not return in the subsequent summer or fall semesters. Students suspended following the summer semester may not return for the subsequent fall or spring semesters. The student may file a written appeal to the dean of the student's college and, if successful, be allowed to attend classes during the next semester.

A student who is suspended may continue enrollment if the student meets one of the following conditions:

(i) If, during the previous semester, the student earned a semester GPA of at least two point zero; or

(ii) If permitted as the result of a successful written appeal to the dean of the student's college.

Until the student's cumulative GPA is raised to two point zero or above, the student continuing enrollment or returning to the university following academic suspension is strongly advised to enroll for no more than twelve credit hours in any semester. Students are also expected to work with their college office to develop a plan for improving their academic performance. Students on suspension are expected to increase attention to academic activities and decrease hours committed to non-academic activities. In addition, students on suspension must adhere to any conditions as determined by the dean of their college.

(5) Academic dismissal

If a student's cumulative BGSU GPA is in the probation/suspension/dismissal range, the student will be dismissed from the university:

(a) Who has attempted twelve or more hours of letter-graded credit at BGSU; and

(b) Who has been placed on suspension in any previous semester.

A student who has been academically dismissed may not enroll at the university for a period of three calendar years. The student may file a written appeal to the dean of the student's college and, if successful, be allowed to attend classes during the next semester. The student may appeal once during the dismissal period.

A student who is dismissed may continue enrollment if the student meets one of the following conditions:

(i) If, during the previous semester, the student earned a semester GPA of at least two point zero; or

(ii) If permitted as the result of a successful written appeal to the dean of the student's college.

Until the student's cumulative GPA is raised to two point zero or above, the student continuing enrollment or returning to the university following academic dismissal is strongly advised to enroll for no more than twelve credit hours in any semester. Students are also expected to work with their college office to develop a plan for improving their academic performance. Students on dismissal are expected to increase attention to academic activities and decrease hours committed to non-academic activities. In addition, students on dismissal must adhere to any conditions as determined by the dean of their college.

This policy became effective for all undergraduate students at the end of Fall 2000. The policy does not change the terms of suspensions or dismissals occurring prior to Fall 2000. Any probation or suspension that occurred prior to Fall 2000 will be counted in determining whether a student has been previously placed on probation or suspension.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-64 | Withdrawal from the university- undergraduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This university policy is part of the undergraduate catalog. The undergraduate catalog provides university academic policies and information about program requirements. The undergraduate catalog is updated each semester and can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/catalog/academic-policies.html. Colleges and departments may have additional or more specific requirements or policies that relate to an individual program. Students are advised to become familiar with the undergraduate catalog as well as specific requirements and policies related to their degree program.

(B) Policy

If a student leaves the university without proper notice and permission, a mark of "F" is recorded in all courses for which the student is currently enrolled. Such a student is not entitled to any refund of fees.

A student who wishes to withdraw from the university in good standing must obtain the permission of the dean (or dean's designee) of the college in which the student is enrolled. A partial refund of fees may be possible; see office of the bursar. The following rules apply to these situations:

(1) A student who withdraws with permission from the university will have all courses from the semester withdrawn; the withdrawals will be recorded on the academic record as a grade of "W" with a date of withdrawal.

(2) Grades assigned through the academic honesty policy may not be withdrawn or dropped under any circumstances.

(3) Withdrawal from the university is only permitted before the last five days of the fifteen week regular fall or spring sessions or before the last two days of any summer session or other non-fifteen week sessions within fall or spring semesters.

(4) A student who withdraws after the designated dates in a semester (i.e., during the last five weeks of a fifteen week session or during prorated periods for classes of shorter duration) may not return until at least one intervening semester (fall, spring, or summer) has passed, except by special permission of the dean of the college in which s/he is enrolled. Short-duration courses follow the readmission pattern of the general semester in which they are taught.

(5) Retroactive withdrawal (that is, a withdrawal granted after the permitted designated dates may be granted in extraordinary circumstances, if the student is unable to complete classes or contact the university to initiate a withdrawal. A student who suffers a hardship should carefully consider whether withdrawing from the university is an appropriate option as detailed in this policy. Students who complete the semester after suffering a hardship will not be granted a retroactive withdrawal. Furthermore, students will not be considered for a retroactive withdrawal if they have received a grade of Incomplete for the appealed semester as part of an agreement with the faculty member to complete the required work, as such an agreement is an appropriate means for providing flexibility in case of hardship. Retroactive withdrawal must be requested within three years from last day of classes for the semester for which a withdrawal is requested.

(6) Students seeking a retroactive withdrawal must do so in writing to the college in which the student was enrolled during the semester being appealed. The college dean or dean's designee will be responsible for beginning the review process within approximately one month. Efforts will be made to provide equitable and consistent judgments across all colleges. The dean or dean's designee has the sole authority in the decision to grant the retroactive withdrawal.

Most withdrawals from the university are initiated by the student. However, when, in the judgment of the medical staff of the Student Health Service, the physical or mental condition of a student might be a danger to the health or welfare of that student or others on the campus, the university may require the withdrawal of the student from the university. Grades assigned through the academic honesty policy may not be withdrawn or dropped under any circumstances.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Prior Effective Dates: 3/24/2015
Rule 3341-3-65 | Credit by examination-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes criteria for graduate students seeking credit by examination.

(B) Policy

Degree-seeking students may submit a formal petition for credit by examination to the graduate college including evidence of previous study and/or specific experience which they believe should permit them to take such an examination (see documents and forms at http://www.bgsu.edu/graduate/documents-and-forms.html). Students who successfully pass an examination for credit receive a grade of S. A maximum of six graduate credit hours may be taken by examination. Credit by examination cannot be used for a course in which a grade has been received at this university.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-66 | Accelerated bachelor's to master's program-graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

The graduate college at Bowling Green state university has several graduate programs that permit qualified undergraduate students who are earning their bachelors degree at BGSU to apply to an accelerated bachelors to masters program.1 Participating in an accelerated bachelor's to master's program provides students with the opportunity to complete both a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in an efficient manner. Not all masters degree programs participate in the accelerated bachelors to masters program.

1These policies pertain to students who wish to officially work toward both a bachelors degree and masters degree at BGSU simultaneously. Students who wish to take graduate level courses during their senior year but not officially enroll in a masters degree program may apply to do so by earning advanced undergraduate status (AUS). AUS guidelines can be found on the graduate college website documents and forms.

(B) Policy

(1) Admissions requirements

Students interested in pursuing an accelerated bachelors to masters program should see program specific websites for additional guidelines and expectations. In addition to any program-specific requirements, the following graduate college policies apply to all programs.

An application to an accelerated bachelor's to master's program requires the applicant to demonstrate their preparation with the following:

(a) By the start of accelerated status, either:

(i) Seventy-five credit hours earned and an overall BGSU GPA of at least three point twenty two2, or

2 For the purposes of this policy, BGSU GPA is calculated based on BGSU credits only. However, credits transferred into BGSU may be counted as part of credit hours earned (not GPA).

(ii) Ninety credit hours earned and an overall BGSU GPA of at least three point zero;

(b) A completed accelerated bachelors to masters program application;

(c) Official transcripts from all universities attended;

(d) At least one letter of recommendation from a full-time BGSU faculty member, from graduate faculty within the students major or targeted graduate program;

(e) Completion of any other program-specific graduate application requirements (see desired program website).

(2) Student status

Once accepted into an accelerated bachelors to masters program, the student remains coded as an undergraduate student with accelerated status and officially becomes coded as a graduate student once the student has earned the bachelors degree. The students coding as an undergraduate or graduate student is associated with other BGSU policies pertaining to degree status.

(3) Credit hour policies

The following policies apply to students in all accelerated bachelors to masters programs. Applicants should check individual program websites for any additional policies pertaining to that particular program.

(a) After being accepted into an accelerated bachelors to masters program, students may take up to nine credit hours of graduate credit while maintaining undergraduate status.

(b) A maximum of nine graduate credit hours may be overlapped between both the bachelor's and the master's degrees. These overlapped credits can count toward both the undergraduate and graduate degrees (according to the curriculum of each program).

(c) The total number of graduate hours counted toward the master's degree must be greater than or equal to thirty. Students must meet the minimum required graduate credit hours approved for their program.

(d) The total number of unique hours required for the completed accelerated bachelor's plus master's degree is greater than or equal to one hundred forty-one hours.

The state of Ohio normally requires undergraduate bachelor's degrees to have at least one hundred twenty semester hours and master's degrees to have at least thirty hours beyond the bachelor-level. As a result, normally, a student not in an accelerated program is required to have a minimum of one hundred fifty hours for both the bachelor's and master's degrees.

(e) Undergraduate accelerated students may enroll in five thousand and six thousand level graduate classes (not seven thousand).

(f) All graduate policies pertaining to graduate credit hours, time to degree, and other regulations are also applicable to accelerated bachelors to masters program students.

(4) Tuition

Undergraduate students enrolled in accelerated bachelors to masters programs will pay tuition at the undergraduate rate for all coursework through the completion of the bachelors degree. Thereafter, students will be coded as graduate students and pay the graduate rate for tuition and fees.

(5) Financial aid

Students will be eligible for financial aid based on their BGSU student status as either an undergraduate or graduate student. When accelerated students are still in undergraduate status, they remain coded as undergraduate students and may be eligible for financial aid but not graduate assistantships. Once students become regularly admitted graduate students with full graduate student status, they may be eligible for graduate-level financial assistance, including graduate assistantships with stipends and/or graduate tuition scholarships.

(6) Program withdrawal

An undergraduate student admitted to an accelerated bachelor's to master's program may withdraw from the accelerated program and continue as a traditional undergraduate student toward the completion of the bachelor's degree.

(7) Program dismissal

Students who fail to maintain minimum requirements for adequate academic graduate standing will lose accelerated status, and as a result will be unable to continue taking graduate level courses. Under these conditions, if adequate standing is maintained for their undergraduate program, the student may continue in the bachelors degree program.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-67 | Graduate college grade replacement- graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes the criteria for grade replacement for graduate students.

(B) Policy

(1) All graduate courses taken at the university count toward a students cumulative grade point average, including course retakes with the following exception:

For one course retaken at the university, the credit hours and quality points for the original registration will not be used in computing the student's cumulative grade point average. For this course, the credit hours and quality points for the retake registration will be used in computing the student's cumulative grade point average.

(2) A student must complete the "graduate college grade replacement request" form for a grade replacement to be approved.

(3) No grade is removed or erased from a transcript by retaking a course.

(4) Any punitive grade as a result of an academic honesty case may not have the retake policy applied to it. Students may retake these courses to meet degree requirements, but both grades will be used in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average. In cases where the punitive grade is "U," students may retake these courses and it will have no effect on the cumulative grade point average.

(5) Transfer credit is not eligible for grade replacement.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-68 | Non-degree-seeking students under eighteen years of age requesting to enroll in an education abroad program.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

Traveling on education abroad programs involves risks not found when studying on the Bowling Green state university campus. These include, but are not limited to, risks involved in travelling to and within, and returning from, one or more foreign countries; foreign, political, legal, social and economic conditions and potential unrest; different standards of design, safety and maintenance of buildings, public places and conveyances; local medical and weather conditions; local road conditions, dietary and food differences and availability; and other matters. To address the additional considerations involved when the traveler is a minor, BGSU has the following policy for non-degree-seeking students under the age of eighteen.

(B) Policy scope

This policy applies to any non-degree-seeking student who wishes to participate in any credit-bearing BGSU program that involves travel outside the United States and who is under the age of eighteen when program-related travel commences.

(C) Policy definitions

(1) A "non-degree-seeking student" is any person who has not been admitted to a degree program at BGSU but who wishes to take one or more undergraduate BGSU classes.

(2) A "credit-bearing BGSU education abroad program" is any credit-bearing program coordinated or led by a BGSU instructor that involves travel outside the United States.

(D) Policy

A non-degree-seeking student within the scope of this policy who wishes to participate in any credit-bearing BGSU education abroad program must meet the following requirements in addition to the generally-applicable program requirements:

(1) The student, together with their parent(s) or legal guardian(s), must meet with the education abroad coordinator to discuss the risks involved in travel and education abroad.

(2) The parent(s) or legal guardian(s) must designate an adult who will accompany the student throughout the program and must pay all costs for that designated adult. A BGSU instructor who is leading or coordinating the program may not be the designated adult.

(3) The students parent(s) or legal guardian(s) must read and sign a consent, medical authorization, and release agreement form provided by BGSU.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-69 | Academic forgiveness for graduate students- graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes the policies and conditions related to academic forgiveness for graduate students.

(B) Policy

(1) Eligibility criteria: to be eligible for academic forgiveness, the student must:

(a) Be conditionally admitted to a new degree or certificate program after an absence of a least one calendar year;

(b) Have a submitted academic forgiveness request;

(c) Earn a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in the first nine graded graduate hours completed since returning (e.g., no S/U or audit); and

(d) Apply prior to the end of the semester following the completion of nine graded graduate hours since returning.

(2) Effects of an approved academic forgiveness: when the above eligibility criteria have been met and the academic forgiveness request has been approved, the following will happen:

(a) All graduate level grades earned at BGSU prior to reentry are excluded from the calculation of the GPA (i.e., forgiven);

(b) Each grade that is subject to this policy will remain on the official transcript but will be noted as "forgiven."

(c) The student automatically forfeits the right to use any of the excluded course work toward current or future degree or certificate requirements.

(3) Conditions:

(a) Any academic honesty violations, probations, suspensions, or dismissals from prior semesters will remain on the students academic record.

(b) Any punitive grades awarded as the result of an academic honesty violation will not be forgiven. These grades will continue to be used to calculate the students cumulative grade point average. Grades of S or U will not have any impact on the student's grade point average.

(c) Courses taken during the students time away from BGSU cannot be transferred in toward current or future degree or certificate requirements.

(d) Academic forgiveness cannot be applied after a student earns a graduate degree or certificate.

(e) A student can have academic forgiveness applied to their academic record only one time, regardless of how many times they enter or attend graduate programs at BGSU.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-70 | Selection of textbooks and other instructional materials.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

Section 3345.025 of the Revised Code requires each state institution of higher education to adopt a textbook selection policy for faculty to follow in selecting and assigning textbooks and other instructional materials for use in courses offered by the institution. 20 U.S.C 1015b requires each institution of higher education that receives federal financial assistance to provide certain information about required and recommended textbooks and supplemental materials before course registration. This policy is intended to promote compliance with those statutes. It includes faculty responsibilities and actions faculty should take in selecting and assigning textbooks and other instructional materials.

(B) Policy scope

This policy applies to each course offered at BGSU and to all textbooks sold to the university or its students.

(C) Definitions

(1) Faculty

As used in paragraphs (A) to (D) of this policy, the term "faculty" means the instructor of record for a course. In paragraph (E) of this rule, "faculty" means all university faculty and those other university employees who are teaching a course or courses.

(2) Textbook

The term "textbook" includes all instructional materials purchased by BGSU students.

(D) Policy

(1) Academic freedom

The university recognizes that faculty have a right to select their own textbooks, but that right is limited by considerations such as quality, cost, availability, and the need for coordination with other faculty or courses. Subject to those considerations and applicable law, faculty are free to select course content and textbooks that they deem most appropriate for their course offering and that also align with curricula approved by the program, department, or school.

(2) Quality and excellence

The academic freedom exercised by faculty carries with it the responsibility of assuring a teaching environment in which learning thrives. High quality textbooks and their effective use in class contribute significantly to that outcome. When considering which textbooks are most suitable for use within a course, faculty shall consider the following factors:

(a) The reputation of the author and publisher;

(b) Content coverage and the textbooks popularity;

(c) Physical characteristics relevant to convenience of use by all students (such as size, weight, electronic accessibility, and equipment demand);

(d) Affordability; and

(e) Discipline-specific considerations.

(3) Minimizing costs

When selecting textbooks, faculty shall give particular consideration to keeping the cost to students as low as practicable without compromising the quality of their education. Faculty are encouraged to consider assigning or allowing students to use ebooks or older editions when feasible; to investigate alternative sources such as library materials and open-access materials; and to put materials on reserve in the library.

Faculty should require the purchase of a textbook only if it is an integral and extensively-used part of the course. If a textbook is to be used for occasional consultation only, faculty should not require students to purchase it.

(4) When information about textbooks is provided to students; results of non-fulfillment

In an effort to reduce costs to students and allow them ample time to obtain materials before the start of class, faculty shall use the appropriate institutional outlets to provide students with as much information as possible about all textbooks required for a course, including ISBN number and price. To assure compliance with federal law, this information must be made available before the first day of registration for the course.

If this deadline is not met, the department chair/school director shall select the textbook(s) for the course.

The department chair/school director shall select the textbook(s) for any course or course section without an assigned instructor of record.

When selecting a textbook, the chair or director shall consult with faculty in the unit when practicable.

(E) Ohio ethics law awareness; earning royalties or other payments on sales of textbooks

Ohio ethics law prohibits a public official or employee from making a decision or recommendation that results in a personal benefit. Accordingly, a faculty member who stands to earn a royalty or other payment from the sale or rental of a textbook shall not participate in any discussion or decision-making related to the selection of that textbook for use in any university course. The faculty member may identify the textbook as suitable for use, but the decision to select or assign the textbook shall only be made by the department chair or school director (with the concurrence of the dean or designee) or by the relevant curriculum or textbook selection committee.

To help ensure compliance with Ohio ethics law, faculty members shall also refrain from: selling a textbook directly to a student; selling to anyone (e.g., a book reseller) a textbook the faculty member received because of their employment at BGSU; and participating in any manner in the selection of a textbook if the faculty member receives any payment (e.g., a consulting fee) from a company engaged in the sale or distribution of textbooks.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-71 | Travel and data security policy for BGSU-owned devices.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy offers protections to the intellectual property and privileged data of the university and BGSU faculty, staff, and students when travelling to countries identified by the U.S. government as being "high risk" for engaging in cybersecurity threats on foreign visitors. The required data security precautions listed below are designed to limit breaches of student data, institutional data, research data, and other types of privileged information that could occur while BGSU personnel are traveling abroad.

Individual travelers are responsible for compliance with this policy.

(B) Policy scope

This policy encompasses the use of university-owned computer laptops, mobile tablets, and data storage devices while traveling in high risk countries, regardless of the purpose of the travel. It pertains to BGSU faculty, staff, and graduate student teaching assistants and research assistants who have been individually assigned a university-owned laptop or mobile tablet.

(C) Policy definitions

"High risk countries" refers to countries, regions and cities which are the subject of relevant travel warnings issued by the U.S. state department and other government agencies. The university reserves the right in its sole discretion to designate other locations as "high-risk." A list of high risk countries is maintained by ITS and provided on its international travel website.

(D) Policy

(1) Required protections

Use of technology during international travel to countries identified as being high risk countries must adhere to the required protections provided by the information technology services department. The list of countries as well as the required protections for information technology resources can change frequently. Faculty and staff must visit the BGSU information technology international travel website and adhere to the required protections for travel to high risk countries. The minimum list of required protections are:

(a) Consult the ITS international travel website to determine if the country to which you are travelling is listed as a high risk country and for an updated list of required protections.

(b) Do not take your individually assigned BGSU device(s) such as a laptop computer or a mobile tablet device to a high risk country; instead, contact the ITS service desk at least ten working days prior to travel to obtain a "clean" laptop.

(c) Only load necessary data onto the clean BGSU laptop.

(d) Use the BGSU VPN to connect back to BGSU resources.

(e) Do not connect a flash drive to any foreign device while in a high risk country.

(f) Do not connect a foreign flash drive to the clean BGSU laptop at any time.

(g) Immediately upon your return to the United States, bring all devices back to ITS for forensics review and cleaning. Do not connect any device, including personal mobile phones, to the BGSU server prior to its being checked by ITS.

(h) Change your BGSU password once you have returned back to BGSU using your individually assigned BGSU device.

(i) Travelers are strongly urged to use a disposable mobile phone while in a high risk country.

(2) Use of BGSU devices on personal travel

Faculty or staff members who are travelling to high risk countries for non-job-related reasons are not allowed to bring BGSU owned electronic devices with them unless they are in compliance with this policy.

(E) Enforcement and sanctions

Individuals or entities in violation of this policy will be referred to the appropriate disciplinary process. A violation of this policy may result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.

(F) Implementation of policy

This policy is owned and maintained by the office of the provost. However, the elements contained within the policy are impacted by various departments across the university, including, but not limited to, international programs and partnerships, office of sponsored programs and research, risk management/environmental health and safety, and information technology services.

(G) Related policies

rule 3341-6-07 of the Administrative Code (BGSU information technology)

rule 3341-6-18 of the Administrative Code Data (use and protection)

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-72 | Master's degree - dual specializations - graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This policy describes the dual specialization option that exists in some masters degree programs.

(B) Policy scope

If academically appropriate to their program, a student may simultaneously pursue two specializations within a single masters degree. Students pursuing two specializations must simultaneously complete all of the requirements of both specializations, then both specializations would appear on the same transcript. Overlap is permitted as defined by each specialization, however a minimum of nine credits must be unique to each specialization.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-73 | Master's degree - second master's degree - graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This describes the policies associated with completing a second masters degree program at BGSU.

(B) Policy scope

(1) Second masters degree requirements

(a) A student may pursue masters degrees in two unrelated disciplines at Bowling Green state university, and these two masters degrees can be completed concurrently or consecutively.

(b) Course credits:

In addition to completing the basic core requirements for both programs, students can share up to nine course credits between programs (if academically appropriate). If a student is completing a second masters degree concurrent with another masters degree, these shared credits must be approved by both programs and the graduate college. If a student is completing a second masters degree after the completion of a first masters degree, these shared credits must be approved by the second masters program and the graduate college.

(c) Culminating experiences:

Students pursuing a second masters degree must complete separate culminating experiences (e.g., thesis, comprehensive exam, etc.) in each masters program. No shared culminating experience credits are permitted.

(d) Total credits:

Including any allowed shared credits, a student must meet the total minimum credit and curricular requirements of both masters degrees.

(e) Limitations:

A minimum of eighteen credits must be completed at six thousand-level for each master's program. If a six thousand-level course is shared, it can be then counted toward both programs' eighteen credit minimum. Time-to-degree rules apply for all courses.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345
Rule 3341-3-74 | Master's degree - dual master's degrees - graduate.
 

(A) Policy statement and purpose

This describes the policies associated with completing dual masters degrees at BGSU.

(B) Policy scope

(1) Requirements for dual masters degrees

(a) A student may design a program of study incorporating two related fields leading to the simultaneous award of two masters degrees. The purpose of the students program must be directed to developing competencies in two collateral fields of inquiry or to building an interdisciplinary specialization that integrates the knowledge and analytical skills of the two disciplines.

(b) Requesting dual master's degrees:

A student must be admitted to two masters degrees before applying for dual masters status. Dual masters status must be requested by the student and approved by both programs and the graduate college. The application for dual masters status must include the students rationale and the proposed curriculum to be followed. Students are encouraged to apply as soon as possible, to ensure the integrative nature of the two degrees.

(c) Course credits:

In addition to completing the basic core requirements for both programs, students can share up to nine course credits between programs (if academically appropriate and approved by both programs).

(d) Culminating experience:

To demonstrate a capacity for an effective integration of the two fields, the student must complete a shared culminating experience with content drawn from both programs (e.g., thesis, comprehensive exam, etc.). Committee members assessing the culminating experience must be drawn from both programs. The maximum amount of shared culminating experience credits is six.

(e) Total credits:

Including any allowed shared credits, a student must meet the total minimum credit and curricular requirements of both masters degrees.

(f) Limitations:

A minimum of eighteen credits must be completed at six thousand-level for each master's program. If a six thousand-level course is shared, it can be then counted toward both programs' eighteen credit minimum. Time-to-degree rules apply for all courses.

Supplemental Information

Authorized By: 3345
Amplifies: 3345